Strathpeffer WWI page 1

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Photo: #6532

Anderson William, Pte, Strathpeffer

Private. William Anderson

Date of Paper: 30.06.1916
Surname: Anderson
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: 9th Seaforths (Pioneers)
Home Address: Strathpeffer

Above is a photograph of Private. William Anderson, 9th Seaforths (Pioneers) who was reported wounded and admitted to hospital recently. Pte. Anderson, who is the only son of the late Mr Anderson, forester, Castle Leod, went to France with his battalion over a year ago, during which period he has seen much service. Prior to enlistment he held a good appointment on the Dunrobin Estates, where he was highly esteemed. He is suffering from a gunshot wound to the right arm.
Pte. Anderson is at the Carter Knowle Hospital, Sheffield, and is getting on very well now. He expects to be there for some time. His number is 4778, 9th Seaforths (Pioneers)

Photo: #5797

Cameron Alexander, Pte, Forres ex Achterneed

Private Alexander Cameron

Date of Paper: 17.05.1918
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Forres ex. Achterneed

As briefly announced, Pte. Alexander Cameron, Seaforths, whose wife and three children reside at Forres, and who was the son of the late Mr Hugh Cameron, crofter, Achterneed, and a brother of Mr Duncan Cameron, crofter and surfaceman, there, fell in action in France on 25th March, 1918. Deceased was 42 years of age. He joined up under the impulse of the Derby scheme, and reported to the Colours in February, 1915. Since then, except when home with wounds, or on leave, he has been with the battalion of Morayshire men. Before the war he was a well known boots in Forres. For many years he was in the Commercial Hotel there, and latterly served in the Moray Arms, Forres. He had a fine personality, a fine figure and, although on the borderline of the then military age of 39 years, he had still a physique worthy of his splendid courage. There will be genuine sympathy with the widow and family, and here about Achterneed sincere regret at the passing of such a gallant soldier.

His photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6511

Cameron Duncan J, Corp, Strathpeffer

Corporal Duncan John Cameron

Date of Paper: 14.01.1916
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Duncan John
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Home Address: Camuserrochd, Strathpeffer

THE LATE CORPORAL D. J. CAMERON, STRATHPEFFER

Above is reproduced a portrait of the late Corporal Duncan John Cameron, Royal Engineers, elder son of Mr and Mrs D. Cameron, Camuserrochd, Strathpeffer, whose death at the Dardanelles about the 16th December we recorded in our last issue. The deceased was born in Strathpeffer on 28th July, 1889, and was therefore in his 27th year. He was educated at the Inverness Academy and Heriot Watt College, Edinburgh. Choosing engineering as his profession, he served his apprenticeship as an electrical and mechanical engineer in the works of Messrs Bertram, Ltd, Edinburgh, and the Caledonian Engineering Works, Kilmarnock. Subsequently he followed his profession in Bristol, and was there when hostilities broke out. He responded to the call to serve his country, and joined the Royal Engineers, where his ability was soon recognised and his promotion was rapid. He was sent to the Dardanelles in August, 1915, and had been on duty from then till he met his end. Quite recently his father received a cheerful letter stating that he was longing to get home to give them all his news he could not put on paper. He was a tall, handsome young man, with a very promising future.

See below for details of his younger brother Victor Cameron

Photo: #6531

Cameron Victor, Pte, Strathpeffer

Private Victor Cameron

Date of Paper: 14.01.1916
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Victor
Rank: Private
Regiment: H (Brahan) Coy, 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Camuserrochd, Strathpeffer

1830 Private Victor Cameron H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths, who is in France with the battalion, is the second son of Mr and Mrs Cameron. Victor was born in Strathpeffer on 4th June, 1897, the late Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee year, hence his name. He was educated privately abroad, and subsequently in the Dingwall Academy and the Edinburgh Academy. He was a law apprentice with Mr W. R. T. Middleton, solicitor, Dingwall, previous to enlisting. Ever since the inauguration of the movement he was an enthusiastic Boy Scout, and this enthusiasm he applied to militarism when the war broke out, and he was one of the first to join the 4th Seaforths when the call for recruits came. He went to Bedford with the battalion and proceeded to France in November, 1914. He was wounded at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, and about two months ago was home on short leave. He is proud of his battalion and the boys of his company, and he willing went back to France, leaving his home to return to the regiment without a sparkle of regret in his eyes. He is a brave lad and will do his [unfinished].

See above for details of his older brother Duncan John Cameron

Photo: #6513

Campbell Donald, Strathpeffer

Donald Campbell

Date of Paper: 18.08.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Mechanical Transport, A.S.C.
Home Address: Highfield Villa, Strathpeffer

TWO STRATHPEFFER BOYS IN EAST AFRICA

Two sons of Mrs M. Campbell, Highfield Villa, Strathpeffer, are gallantly upholding the honour of the Empire in German East Africa, where, under General Smutts, they are driving the Germans into a corner.

Kenneth, the elder brother is 28 years of age, and was a carpenter to trade. He was also a well-known athlete and a very strong runner. He won many prizes at Highland sports and also in London, while he was there, and again in Africa.

Donald is in the mechanical transport, A.S.C. and is 26 years of age. The brothers left Britain for South Africa some 11 years ago. They started in business as contractors, and were extending it rapidly. The “call to the colours” could not be denied; and they both threw up the business and joined His Majesty’s Forces. The latest information is that recently Kenneth had a very narrow escape, a bullet passing between his knees.

Portraits of the two brothers are given above.

See below for details of his older brother Kenneth Campbell
See also below details supplied by Gwyneth Thomas in 2019

Photo: #6514

Campbell Kenneth, Strathpeffer

Kenneth Campbell

Date of Paper: 18.08.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: not stated
Home address: Highfield Villa, Strathpeffer

TWO STRATHPEFFER BOYS IN EAST AFRICA

Two sons of Mrs M. Campbell, Highfield Villa, Strathpeffer, are gallantly upholding the honour of the Empire in German East Africa, where, under General Smutts, they are driving the Germans into a corner.

Kenneth, the elder brother is 28 years of age, and was a carpenter to trade. He was also a well-known athlete and a very strong runner. He won many prizes at Highland sports and also in London, while he was there, and again in Africa.

Donald is in the mechanical transport, A.S.C. and is 26 years of age. The brothers left Britain for South Africa some 11 years ago. They started in business as contractors, and were extending it rapidly. The “call to the colours” could not be denied; and they both threw up the business and joined His Majesty’s Forces. The latest information is that recently Kenneth had a very narrow escape, a bullet passing between his knees.

Portraits of the two brothers are given above.

See above for details of his younger brother Donald Campbell
See below details supplied by Gwyneth Thomas in 2019

In April 2019 RCHS was contacted by Gwyneth Thomas, grand-daughter of Donald Campbell, who provided the undernoted information about the Campbell brothers.

Donald Campbell died in April 1953 and is buried alongside his brother Kenneth, who died in 1951, in the cemetery in Florida, Roodepoort, South Africa. Their brother Murdoch went to Vancouver, Canada, and died in 1986 at the age of 96.

Kenneth married Margaret Mitchell Bryden and had no children. Donald married Mary Main Oakes, whose parents were from Glasgow, and had two children, John Alexander, born 1934, and Catherine Mary, born 1926.

Photo: #6522

Campbell George, Pte, Strathpeffer

Private George Campbell

Date of Paper: 16.11.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): George
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Glenburn, Achterneed, Strathpeffer

Simon Campbell (left) and George Campbell (right)
Photograph courtesy of their nephew, John Rich, Petersham, Australia

Mrs Campbell, Glenburn, Achterneed, Strathpeffer, has been officially informed that her son, Pte. Simon M. Campbell, Seaforths (Service Battalion) was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Another son, Private George Campbell, Seaforths, was severely wounded the following day.

Photographs of the two brothers appear to-day.

Pte. S. M. Campbell was well-known in Dingwall and Beauly as well as in his own native district. For three years he was an ironmonger with Mr Morrison, Beauly. Subsequently he entered the employment of Messrs C. & J. Urquhart, Dingwall, whose services he left early in the war to join the colours. He was a fine, upstanding youth, brave and courageous with a high standard of personal honour and a genial, pleasant, and happy manner. His death is deeply regretted in the battalion, and sincere sympathy goes out to his mother in her bereavement.

Captain C. Barrington Anderson, M.C., writing to Mrs Campbell, says: “It is with the greatest regret I am writing to inform you of the death in action of your son, Pte. S. M. Campbell, of my company, who was killed during an attack made on the 12th October. He was killed by shell fire early in the attack, death being instantaneous. He was an excellent soldier, and had only recently returned to my company. His bright disposition made him a general favourite among his comrades who will miss him greatly. Knowing how much this sad news must mean to you, I send you my heartfelt sympathy in your great loss.”
Pte. George Campbell, who also joined up early in the war, has been severely wounded in the leg, which has been fractured. He is in hospital in France.

See below for details of his brother Simon Campbell

Photo: #6530

Campbell Simon M, Pte, Strathpeffer

private Simon M. Campbell

Date of Paper: 16.11.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Simon M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Glenburn, Achterneed, Strathpeffer

Simon Campbell (left) and George Campbell (right)
Photograph courtesy of their nephew, John Rich, Petersham, Australia

Mrs Campbell, Glenburn, Achterneed, Strathpeffer, has been officially informed that her son, Pte. Simon M. Campbell, Seaforths (Service Battalion) was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Another son, Private George Campbell, Seaforths, was severely wounded the following day.

Photographs of the two brothers appear to-day.

Pte. S. M. Campbell was well-known in Dingwall and Beauly as well as in his own native district. For three years he was an ironmonger with Mr Morrison, Beauly. Subsequently he entered the employment of Messrs C. & J. Urquhart, Dingwall, whose services he left early in the war to join the colours. He was a fine, upstanding youth, brave and courageous with a high standard of personal honour and a genial, pleasant, and happy manner. His death is deeply regretted in the battalion, and sincere sympathy goes out to his mother in her bereavement.

Captain C. Barrington Anderson, M.C., writing to Mrs Campbell, says: “It is with the greatest regret I am writing to inform you of the death in action of your son, Pte. S. M. Campbell, of my company, who was killed during an attack made on the 12th October. He was killed by shell fire early in the attack, death being instantaneous. He was an excellent soldier, and had only recently returned to my company. His bright disposition made him a general favourite among his comrades who will miss him greatly. Knowing how much this sad news must mean to you, I send you my heartfelt sympathy in your great loss.”
Pte. George Campbell, who also joined up early in the war, has been severely wounded in the leg, which has been fractured. He is in hospital in France.

See above for details of his brother George Campbell

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