Muir of Ord WW I page 4

Attribution: Image by Bruce Mewett from Pixabay

You are welcome to comment on these pictures

Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society welcome further information and comments about any person or photos on our website. Adding a comment means that you accept our Privacy Policy.

Photo: #6373

Mackenzie A, Corp, Muir Of Ord

Corporal A. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 31.08.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Scots Guards
Home Address: Tarradale Lodge, Muir of Ord

A ROSS-SHIRE PRISONER IN GERMANY

Corporal A. Mackenzie, Scots Guards, who is a prisoner of war in Germany, where he has been for two and a half years, is a native of Killearnan, and a son of the late Mr Murdo Mackenzie, Tarradale Lodge, Muir of Ord. A reservist prior to the war, he was called to the colours, and was one of the first to assist in France.

A photograph of him appears above, taken in Germany, and shows him wonderfully fit and well.

Photo: #6385

Mackenzie Alexander, L Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Lance Sergeant Alexander Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 12.10.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Lance Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced today photographs of five sons of Mr and Mrs George Mackenzie, shoemaker, Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord, who have all responded to the call of King and country.

The elder son serving is Lance-Corporal Donald Mackenzie, who enlisted in the Canadians and saw much service in France and Flanders, having got his promotion in the field. He was in charge of a large milling business in Ontario before he enlisted.

The second son, Lce-Sergt. Alex. Mackenzie, enlisted in the Seaforths immediately after mobilisation. He proceeded to Bedford, and was subsequently transferred to the Depot at Dingwall, until transferred to somewhere in England, where he is now serving. Prior to mobilisation he was manager of the Dingwall branch of Young & Chapman, drapers, Inverness.

The third son, Driver George Mackenzie, is in the M.T., A.S.C., and enlisted at Edinburgh. After a few months training he proceeded to France, where he is now serving. Prior to enlistment he was chauffeur with Lord Strathclyde.

The fourth son, Pte. John Mackenzie, enlisted at British Columbia in the C.A.M.C., and after being stationed in England for a few weeks proceeded overseas. Recent letters from him give a vivid account of the process under which the wounded are handled from the time they leave the trenches until the time they are finally placed in the base hospitals. He was managing a large dry store in British Columbia before the war.

The fifth and youngest son, Wm. Mackenzie, volunteered for service, but owing to his being a skilled worker, was refused, and is now at one of His Majesty’s Dockyards.

See entries below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6380

Mackenzie Donald, L Corp, Muir OF Ord

Lance Corporal Donald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 12.10.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced today photographs of five sons of Mr and Mrs George Mackenzie, shoemaker, Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord, who have all responded to the call of King and country.

The elder son serving is Lance-Corporal Donald Mackenzie, who enlisted in the Canadians and saw much service in France and Flanders, having got his promotion in the field. He was in charge of a large milling business in Ontario before he enlisted.

The second son, Lce-Sergt. Alex. Mackenzie, enlisted in the Seaforths immediately after mobilisation. He proceeded to Bedford, and was subsequently transferred to the Depot at Dingwall, until transferred to somewhere in England, where he is now serving. Prior to mobilisation he was manager of the Dingwall branch of Young & Chapman, drapers, Inverness.

The third son, Driver George Mackenzie, is in the M.T., A.S.C., and enlisted at Edinburgh. After a few months training he proceeded to France, where he is now serving. Prior to enlistment he was chauffeur with Lord Strathclyde.

The fourth son, Pte. John Mackenzie, enlisted at British Columbia in the C.A.M.C., and after being stationed in England for a few weeks proceeded overseas. Recent letters from him give a vivid account of the process under which the wounded are handled from the time they leave the trenches until the time they are finally placed in the base hospitals. He was managing a large dry store in British Columbia before the war.

The fifth and youngest son, Wm. Mackenzie, volunteered for service, but owing to his being a skilled worker, was refused, and is now at one of His Majesty’s Dockyards.

See entries below & above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6376

Mackenzie George, Driver, Muir Of Ord

Driver George Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 12.10.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): George
Rank: Driver
Regiment: M.T., Army Service Corps
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced today photographs of five sons of Mr and Mrs George Mackenzie, shoemaker, Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord, who have all responded to the call of King and country.

The elder son serving is Lance-Corporal Donald Mackenzie, who enlisted in the Canadians and saw much service in France and Flanders, having got his promotion in the field. He was in charge of a large milling business in Ontario before he enlisted.

The second son, Lce-Sergt. Alex. Mackenzie, enlisted in the Seaforths immediately after mobilisation. He proceeded to Bedford, and was subsequently transferred to the Depot at Dingwall, until transferred to somewhere in England, where he is now serving. Prior to mobilisation he was manager of the Dingwall branch of Young & Chapman, drapers, Inverness.

The third son, Driver George Mackenzie, is in the M.T., A.S.C., and enlisted at Edinburgh. After a few months training he proceeded to France, where he is now serving. Prior to enlistment he was chauffeur with Lord Strathclyde.

The fourth son, Pte. John Mackenzie, enlisted at British Columbia in the C.A.M.C., and after being stationed in England for a few weeks proceeded overseas. Recent letters from him give a vivid account of the process under which the wounded are handled from the time they leave the trenches until the time they are finally placed in the base hospitals. He was managing a large dry store in British Columbia before the war.

The fifth and youngest son, Wm. Mackenzie, volunteered for service, but owing to his being a skilled worker, was refused, and is now at one of His Majesty’s Dockyards.

See entries below & above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6400

Mackenzie John, Pte, Ivy Cottage, Muir Of Ord

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 12.10.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadian Army Medical Corps
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced today photographs of five sons of Mr and Mrs George Mackenzie, shoemaker, Ivy Cottage, Balvaird, Muir of Ord, who have all responded to the call of King and country.

The elder son serving is Lance-Corporal Donald Mackenzie, who enlisted in the Canadians and saw much service in France and Flanders, having got his promotion in the field. He was in charge of a large milling business in Ontario before he enlisted.

The second son, Lce-Sergt. Alex. Mackenzie, enlisted in the Seaforths immediately after mobilisation. He proceeded to Bedford, and was subsequently transferred to the Depot at Dingwall, until transferred to somewhere in England, where he is now serving. Prior to mobilisation he was manager of the Dingwall branch of Young & Chapman, drapers, Inverness.

The third son, Driver George Mackenzie, is in the M.T., A.S.C., and enlisted at Edinburgh. After a few months training he proceeded to France, where he is now serving. Prior to enlistment he was chauffeur with Lord Strathclyde.

The fourth son, Pte. John Mackenzie, enlisted at British Columbia in the C.A.M.C., and after being stationed in England for a few weeks proceeded overseas. Recent letters from him give a vivid account of the process under which the wounded are handled from the time they leave the trenches until the time they are finally placed in the base hospitals. He was managing a large dry store in British Columbia before the war.

The fifth and youngest son, Wm. Mackenzie, volunteered for service, but owing to his being a skilled worker, was refused, and is now at one of His Majesty’s Dockyards.

See entries above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6408

Mackenzie Donald, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1st Camerons
Home Address: Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord

THREE MUIR OF ORD MACKENZIES

There is reproduced today photographs of three Muir of Ord Mackenzies of whom one is killed, one has been long missing and is now believed to have made the supreme sacrifice, while the third has been presented with the Croix de Guerre by the French for conspicuous gallantry. They are sons of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Tarradale Muir, Ross-shire.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, went over with the British Expeditionary Force in August 1914, and was reported missing on September 1914. He is officially presumed to have been killed.

265217 Sergt. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, has seen much active service, and wears the high honour of the Croix de Guerre, presented by the French for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.
Much sympathy will be felt in the district with Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, who sadly miss their two gallant soldier sons.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

THREE MUIR OF ORD SONS KILLED

Sergt. John Mackenzie, M.M., with Bar and Croix de Guerre, 1/4th Seaforths, reported missing on March 25, 1918, is now officially presumed to have been killed on that date. The son of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord, was one of three sons, all of whom have now made the supreme sacrifice.

Sergeant Mackenzie was a singularly brave and intrepid soldier, although at the time of his death he was only 21 years of age. He joined the 4th Seaforths at the outset of war, and saw much active service on the field. It was at the battle of Beaumont Hamel, in the end of 1916, that he gained his sergeant’s stripes, was awarded the Military Medal, and subsequently was decorated with the Croix de Guerre. Later on, shortly before his death, for further gallantry in the field, he was given a Bar to his Military Medal. Popular in the regiment, familiar owing to his long service, the famous 51st Division had few more intrepid fighters than this fine, manly youth, from the heart of the Highlands. His comrades will not forget him today when Peace lightens the field of battle. A photograph of deceased is reproduced today.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, one of the old contemptibles, was reported missing in September 1914.

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie, 8051, who also belonged to the 1st Camerons, was killed in action on 13th October 1915. With the bereaved parents in their triple loss the whole countryside of the Muir and beyond will ever have the deepest sympathy.

In April 2018 the Ross-shire Journal reported on the research undertaken by Sergeant John Mackenzie’s great-nephew, Ken Macdonald and his wife Kath, to identify his grave, and the account which follows is courtesy of the Editor of the Ross-shire Journal.


Ken and Kath Macdonald at Anneux British Cemetery with Rev Paul van Sittert and members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland following the service.

John Mackenzie was born in April 1896 and was the son of Donald and Isabella Mackenzie. He enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, at the beginning of World War 1 and served throughout the conflict until he died on 25 March 1918, shortly after the start of the German Spring Offensive.

He fought in the capture of Beaumont Hamel in 1916 and later that year was awarded the Military Medal and French Croix de Guerre. Just prior to his death Sergeant Mackenzie was awarded a Bar to the Military Medal.

Ken and Kath Macdonald’s research revealed that John Mackenzie had been wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans. He later died of his wounds and was buried in a mass grave in the village of Inchy-en-Artois.

After the war his grave was moved to Anneux British Cemetery where he was buried as an Unknown Soldier and, with his whereabouts unknown, was commemorated on the Arras Memorial. It was through seeing John’s name on that Memorial some 22 years ago that spurred Ken and Kath Macdonald to attempt to find his grave.

Through research by the Ministry of Defence’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), supported by evidence provided by the family, the “unknown soldier” grave was identified as that of Sergeant John Mackenzie.

A rededication service took place on 27 March 2018, attended by Mr and Mrs Macdonald and five family members. Nine members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland were also present. At the service, John Mackenzie’s brothers, Donald and Kenneth, both still missing on the battlefields of northern France, were remembered.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6411

Mackenzie John, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Photo: #6410

Mackenzie John, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Rededication service took place on 27 March 2018

Sergeant John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord

THREE MUIR OF ORD MACKENZIES

There is reproduced today photographs of three Muir of Ord Mackenzies of whom one is killed, one has been long missing and is now believed to have made the supreme sacrifice, while the third has been presented with the Croix de Guerre by the French for conspicuous gallantry. They are sons of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Tarradale Muir, Ross-shire.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, went over with the British Expeditionary Force in August 1914, and was reported missing on September 1914. He is officially presumed to have been killed.

265217 Sergt. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, has seen much active service, and wears the high honour of the Croix de Guerre, presented by the French for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.
Much sympathy will be felt in the district with Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, who sadly miss their two gallant soldier sons.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

THREE MUIR OF ORD SONS KILLED

Sergt. John Mackenzie, M.M., with Bar and Croix de Guerre, 1/4th Seaforths, reported missing on March 25, 1918, is now officially presumed to have been killed on that date. The son of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord, was one of three sons, all of whom have now made the supreme sacrifice.

Sergeant Mackenzie was a singularly brave and intrepid soldier, although at the time of his death he was only 21 years of age. He joined the 4th Seaforths at the outset of war, and saw much active service on the field. It was at the battle of Beaumont Hamel, in the end of 1916, that he gained his sergeant’s stripes, was awarded the Military Medal, and subsequently was decorated with the Croix de Guerre. Later on, shortly before his death, for further gallantry in the field, he was given a Bar to his Military Medal. Popular in the regiment, familiar owing to his long service, the famous 51st Division had few more intrepid fighters than this fine, manly youth, from the heart of the Highlands. His comrades will not forget him today when Peace lightens the field of battle. A photograph of deceased is reproduced today.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, one of the old contemptibles, was reported missing in September 1914.

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie, 8051, who also belonged to the 1st Camerons, was killed in action on 13th October 1915. With the bereaved parents in their triple loss the whole countryside of the Muir and beyond will ever have the deepest sympathy.

In April 2018 the Ross-shire Journal reported on the research undertaken by Sergeant John Mackenzie’s great-nephew, Ken Macdonald and his wife Kath, to identify his grave, and the account which follows is courtesy of the Editor of the Ross-shire Journal.


Ken and Kath Macdonald at Anneux British Cemetery with Rev Paul van Sittert and members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland following the service.

John Mackenzie was born in April 1896 and was the son of Donald and Isabella Mackenzie. He enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, at the beginning of World War 1 and served throughout the conflict until he died on 25 March 1918, shortly after the start of the German Spring Offensive.

He fought in the capture of Beaumont Hamel in 1916 and later that year was awarded the Military Medal and French Croix de Guerre. Just prior to his death Sergeant Mackenzie was awarded a Bar to the Military Medal.

Ken and Kath Macdonald’s research revealed that John Mackenzie had been wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans. He later died of his wounds and was buried in a mass grave in the village of Inchy-en-Artois.

After the war his grave was moved to Anneux British Cemetery where he was buried as an Unknown Soldier and, with his whereabouts unknown, was commemorated on the Arras Memorial. It was through seeing John’s name on that Memorial some 22 years ago that spurred Ken and Kath Macdonald to attempt to find his grave.

Through research by the Ministry of Defence’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), supported by evidence provided by the family, the “unknown soldier” grave was identified as that of Sergeant John Mackenzie.

A rededication service took place on 27 March 2018, attended by Mr and Mrs Macdonald and five family members. Nine members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland were also present. At the service, John Mackenzie’s brothers, Donald and Kenneth, both still missing on the battlefields of northern France, were remembered.

See entry above & entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6403

Mackenzie Kenneth, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Kenneth Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Camerons
Home Address: Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord

THREE MUIR OF ORD MACKENZIES

There is reproduced today photographs of three Muir of Ord Mackenzies of whom one is killed, one has been long missing and is now believed to have made the supreme sacrifice, while the third has been presented with the Croix de Guerre by the French for conspicuous gallantry. They are sons of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Tarradale Muir, Ross-shire.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, went over with the British Expeditionary Force in August 1914, and was reported missing on September 1914. He is officially presumed to have been killed.

265217 Sergt. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, has seen much active service, and wears the high honour of the Croix de Guerre, presented by the French for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.
Much sympathy will be felt in the district with Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, who sadly miss their two gallant soldier sons.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

THREE MUIR OF ORD SONS KILLED

Sergt. John Mackenzie, M.M., with Bar and Croix de Guerre, 1/4th Seaforths, reported missing on March 25, 1918, is now officially presumed to have been killed on that date. The son of Mr and Mrs K. J. Mackenzie, Lochnasatch, Muir of Ord, was one of three sons, all of whom have now made the supreme sacrifice.

Sergeant Mackenzie was a singularly brave and intrepid soldier, although at the time of his death he was only 21 years of age. He joined the 4th Seaforths at the outset of war, and saw much active service on the field. It was at the battle of Beaumont Hamel, in the end of 1916, that he gained his sergeant’s stripes, was awarded the Military Medal, and subsequently was decorated with the Croix de Guerre. Later on, shortly before his death, for further gallantry in the field, he was given a Bar to his Military Medal. Popular in the regiment, familiar owing to his long service, the famous 51st Division had few more intrepid fighters than this fine, manly youth, from the heart of the Highlands. His comrades will not forget him today when Peace lightens the field of battle. A photograph of deceased is reproduced today.

Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, 7214, 1st Camerons, one of the old contemptibles, was reported missing in September 1914.

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie, 8051, who also belonged to the 1st Camerons, was killed in action on 13th October 1915. With the bereaved parents in their triple loss the whole countryside of the Muir and beyond will ever have the deepest sympathy.

In April 2018 the Ross-shire Journal reported on the research undertaken by Sergeant John Mackenzie’s great-nephew, Ken Macdonald and his wife Kath, to identify his grave, and the account which follows is courtesy of the Editor of the Ross-shire Journal.


Ken and Kath Macdonald at Anneux British Cemetery with Rev Paul van Sittert and members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland following the service.

John Mackenzie was born in April 1896 and was the son of Donald and Isabella Mackenzie. He enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders, at the beginning of World War 1 and served throughout the conflict until he died on 25 March 1918, shortly after the start of the German Spring Offensive.

He fought in the capture of Beaumont Hamel in 1916 and later that year was awarded the Military Medal and French Croix de Guerre. Just prior to his death Sergeant Mackenzie was awarded a Bar to the Military Medal.

Ken and Kath Macdonald’s research revealed that John Mackenzie had been wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans. He later died of his wounds and was buried in a mass grave in the village of Inchy-en-Artois.

After the war his grave was moved to Anneux British Cemetery where he was buried as an Unknown Soldier and, with his whereabouts unknown, was commemorated on the Arras Memorial. It was through seeing John’s name on that Memorial some 22 years ago that spurred Ken and Kath Macdonald to attempt to find his grave.

Through research by the Ministry of Defence’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (JCCC), supported by evidence provided by the family, the “unknown soldier” grave was identified as that of Sergeant John Mackenzie.

A rededication service took place on 27 March 2018, attended by Mr and Mrs Macdonald and five family members. Nine members of the Royal Regiment of Scotland were also present. At the service, John Mackenzie’s brothers, Donald and Kenneth, both still missing on the battlefields of northern France, were remembered.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5802

Mackenzie John, Seaman, Aird

Seaman John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 20.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Seaman
Regiment: Navy
Home Address: 5, Aird

SEAMAN JOHN MACKENZIE, AIRD

Official notice has been received by Mr Murdo Mackenzie, shoemaker, 5 Aird, that his son, Seaman John Mackenzie, who was serving as gunner on S.S. [left blank], was killed by enemy action on 10th August. Deceased, who was 28 years of age, had been on active service since the beginning of the war. He fought with the Antwerp Relief Expedition. A fine specimen of the Highlander, strong, handsome, courteous, and brimful of humour, his genial presence will be sadly missed by his many friends and admirers. Much sympathy is felt for his parents, who have lost in him their mainstay. Mr Mackenzie has another son and several grandsons engaged in the national defence.
A photo of Seaman Mackenzie appears today.

No photo available

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 21.09.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Black Dyke, Fairburn

Pte. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, killed in action in France on the 18th ult., was the eldest son of Mr Donald Mackenzie, Black Dyke, Fairburn, and was 20 years of age. Before war broke out he was a Territorial for two years, and was one year at the front. During that time he was not home on leave. Previous to joining up he was engaged as a farm worker with Mr W. Munro, Glenglass, Evanton. A photograph is reproduced today.

In a letter to Mrs Mackenzie, the commanding officer of Private Mackenzie’s company writes: It is my painful duty to inform you that your son was killed instantaneously by a trench mortar shell on the early morning of the 18th August. He was a member of a Lewis gun team, and held an important post. He was a fine soldier and keen on his work, inspiring confidence in others, and it will take a good man to fill his shoes. A man such as he was is a great loss to a fighting battalion such as ours is, and as he was popular with both officers and men he will be sadly missed socially. Please accept the sincerest sympathy of myself and brother officers. Your son was properly buried well behind our lines. There was a burial party, and the service was conducted by our Presbyterian minister.
His platoon commander writes: It may be some satisfaction to you to know that he was killed at his post and died instantaneously. He was a very fine fellow, and his loss is deplored by both officers and men. He died like a true soldier.

The Chaplain writes: “I buried your son in presence of his officer and the men of his company in a little quiet cemetery behind the lines. The grave will be marked with a white wooden cross, and will be cared for. His officer told me that he was a good lad, and one for whom he had a great liking, and that he was a great loss to the battalion. I am afraid I cannot say anything to ease your aching heart and relieve your sense of loss, but your son was a brave man, who died doing his duty, and he has entered into his reward. He did a Christ-like thing, for no man can make a better use of his life than by giving it as a gift to others and laying it down for us all.”

A sergeant comrade writes: “He had been with me since his arrival in France, and I found in him a splendid soldier, who was always attentive to duty. He will be missed very much by his comrades, many of whom came from the same district. On behalf of the Lewis gunners of the battalion I tender our sincere sympathy to you and the other members of your family. May you be able to see the hand of Providence through your sorrow.”

Photo: #6375

Mackenzie William, Dockyards, Muir Of Ord

William Mackenzie, Dockyards

 

 

No details found

Please submit your comment

Do you have any more information about any of the content on this page.

Your comments are always welcome: