Muir of Ord WW I page 2

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Photo: #7134

Fraser Daniel,

Driver D. Fraser

Date of Paper: 11.08.1916
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Driver
Regiment: Motor Transport Corps
Home Address: Muir of Ord

Mr Hugh Fraser, police sergeant, Muir of Ord, has been officialy notified that his second son, Private Farquhar Fraser, 1st Batt. Scots Guards, was killed in action at the battle of La Bassee, on the 25th January 1915. Prior to enlistment Private Fraser was a police constable in the Glasgow Police Force, and previous to joining the Glasgow Police he was barman with Mr MacAlister, Imperial Hotel, Inverness. He was 23 years of age.

Mr Fraser has other two sons serving his King and country. His eldest son, Corporal Hugh Fraser, is serving with the Ross Battery in Egypt, and his third son, Driver D. Fraser, is in the Motor Transport Corps, somewhere in France.

Mr Fraser has received a letter of sympathy in name of the King, and signed by Mr Asquith. The Glasgow Police Force, through Superintendent A. Mackinnon, has expressed its deepest sympathy. “Your son,” the letter says, “while a member of this Force displayed great devotion to duty, and was very popular with the Force and the general public.”

A photo of Private Fraser appears to-day.

See entries below for details of his brothers Farquhar and Hugh Fraser

Photo: #6392

Fraser Farquhar, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Farquhar Fraser

Date of Paper: 11.08.1916 and 02.11.1917
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Farquhar
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Battalion Scots Guards
Home Address: Muir of Ord

Mr Hugh Fraser, police sergeant, Muir of Ord, has been officialy notified that his second son, Private Farquhar Fraser, 1st Batt. Scots Guards, was killed in action at the battle of La Bassee, on the 25th January 1915. Prior to enlistment Private Fraser was a police constable in the Glasgow Police Force, and previous to joining the Glasgow Police he was barman with Mr MacAlister, Imperial Hotel, Inverness. He was 23 years of age.

Mr Fraser has other two sons serving his King and country. His eldest son, Corporal Hugh Fraser, is serving with the Ross Battery in Egypt, and his third son, Driver D. Fraser, is in the Motor Transport Corps, somewhere in France.

Mr Fraser has received a letter of sympathy in name of the King, and signed by Mr Asquith. The Glasgow Police Force, through Superintendent A. Mackinnon, has expressed its deepest sympathy. “Your son,” the letter says, “while a member of this Force displayed great devotion to duty, and was very popular with the Force and the general public.”

A photo of Private Fraser appears to-day.

Date of Paper: 02.11.1917

There is reproduced a photograph of the late Pte. Farquhar Fraser, Scots Guards, son of Hugh Fraser, police sergeant, Muir of Ord, who, in his 23rd year, was first reported missing and subsequently reported killed in action at La Bassee on 25th January, 1915. Previous to joining up he was in the Glasgow Police Force.

Two other sons are serving. “D”, Redcastle, contributes the following

In Memoriam verses:

In chivalrous deeds his name is recorded,
Servant of righteousness, valour and truth.
Honoured lad lost – ah! think of the host
That perish in battles, our finest of youth.
Think of the risks he bore for his country,
The call of his Master he valued still more;
Now in his rest – now shared by the best –
To think of the homeland, her praises will soar.
A very true Briton he fighting detested,
But peace he had never till battles he …..
….. he fought – no honour he sought –
To save his dear country, right nobly he ….
But down in our hearts his deeds we shall cherish,
This youth showed example to comrades and all:
….. victories grand – ah! think of our land –
The Empire was threatened, he answered the call.
The tartan he honoured in peace or in battle,
With love of our ensign a warm heart beat true;
Death had no dread – for him it is said,
… honour his country, whoever would rue.
… love and devotion his death has expounded,
The aim was to freedom, but never to boast;
…. to that son – the portals he won –
And entered the city to join in the host.
A glorious mansion he passed on to enter.
While ‘cross on the other side combats still raged;
The river he passed – arrived home at last.
No more will he think of the battles he waged.
And now as he waits for friends o’er the river.
His loved ones we cheer for the comrades they lost.
All honour that son – he victory won,
And entered the city to join in the host.

See entry below for details of his brother Hugh and above for details of his brother D. Fraser

No photo available

Corporal Hugh Fraser

Date of Paper: 11.08.1916
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Ross Battery
Home Address: Muir of Ord

Mr Hugh Fraser, police sergeant, Muir of Ord, has been officialy notified that his second son, Private Farquhar Fraser, 1st Batt. Scots Guards, was killed in action at the battle of La Bassee, on the 25th January 1915. Prior to enlistment Private Fraser was a police constable in the Glasgow Police Force, and previous to joining the Glasgow Police he was barman with Mr MacAlister, Imperial Hotel, Inverness. He was 23 years of age.

Mr Fraser has other two sons serving his King and country. His eldest son, Corporal Hugh Fraser, is serving with the Ross Battery in Egypt, and his third son, Driver D. Fraser, is in the Motor Transport Corps, somewhere in France.

Mr Fraser has received a letter of sympathy in name of the King, and signed by Mr Asquith. The Glasgow Police Force, through Superintendent A. Mackinnon, has expressed its deepest sympathy. “Your son,” the letter says, “while a member of this Force displayed great devotion to duty, and was very popular with the Force and the general public.”

A photo of Private Fraser appears to-day.

See entries above for details of his brothers Farquhar and D. Fraser

Photo: #6384

Fraser W D, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal W. D. Fraser

Date of Paper: Not stated
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): W. D.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 2nd Scots Guards
Home Address: Easter Moy, Muir Of Ord

LANCE CORPORAL W. D. FRASER WOUNDED

AN EASTER MOY ATHLETE

Information has been received by his parents at Easter Moy, Muir of Ord, that Lance Corporal W.D. Fraser, 2nd Scots Guards, was wounded in France about 18th December.

Letters sent to Lance Corporal Fraser had been returned marked “not found” and subsequently he was reported dead. Great was the relief when later information disclosed the fact that he was alive.

Photo: #6396

Goodall James, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private James Goodall

Date of Paper: 08.06.1917
Surname: Goodall
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Wester Balloan, Muir of Ord

PTE. JAMES GOODALL, SEAFORTHS, BALLOAN

Mr James Goodall, Wester Balloan, Muir of Ord, has received a telegram from the War Office intimating that his son, Pte. J. Goodall, Seaforths, has been admitted to No. 13 General Hospital, Boulogne, suffering from gunshot wound in left arm. Unfortunately, since then he has lost his arm, but is making satisfactory progress in a Military Hospital in England. Pte. Jas. Goodall joined the 2/4th Seaforths in 1915, and went to France in June 1916.

A photograph appears today.

Photo: #6387

Gordon Alexander, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Alexander Gordon

Date of Paper: 12.01.1917
Surname: Gordon
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Muir of Ord

THE LATE PTE. ALEX. GORDON, MUIR OF ORD

Private Alex. Gordon, Seaforths, who, as was reported last week, has fallen in action, was a son of Mr Gordon, Muir of Ord.

Before the outbreak of war Alex. Gordon joined the Ross-shire Constabulary. His intelligence and sterling character and zeal for duty filled his future with promise. But his heart was with the comrades who had joined the colours, and at the earliest opportunity he followed them to the training camp and to France. Death met him at the post of duty, and now the remains of the gallant soldier sleep in peace in the midst of the dread strife.

His portrait appears on this page.

Photo: #6377

Innes C T, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal C. T. Innes

Date of Paper: 14.09.1917
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): C. T.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

Above will be found reproduced photographs of three Muir of Ord Seaforths, sons of the lateMr Duncan Innes, and Mrs Innes, Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord.

2/Lieutenant Donald A. Innes who is 31 years of age, was previous to the outbreak of war in the office of Messrs James Watson and Coy., Ltd., Ord Distillery. He mobilised with the County Territorial Battalion in August, 1914, when he held the rank of colour-sergeant. He has completed 11 years service, having been in the old volunteers previous to the adoption of the territorial system. He served with the battalion in France in 1914-15, when he was invalided home after Neuve Chapelle. While at home he received his commission, and after training he went out again in June of this year, and was severely wounded in the advance of 31st July. He has, unfortunately, lost a leg, but the latest information is that he is progressing favourably.

Lance Corporal. C. T. Innes, Seaforths, who is 29 years of age, previous to joining the county battalion early this year was employed in the tramway department of the Glasgow Corporation. Like his officer brother he went to France early in June, and the latest report is that he is safe and well.

Private D. R. Innes, previously Seaforths, now Machine Gun Corps, is 26 years of age. Prior to the outbreak of war he was an assistant with Messrs Young and Chapman, drapers, Dingwall, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr George Urquhart, their predecessor. He mobilised with the county battalion, proceeding with it to France in November, 1914. Subsequently he was transferred to the M.G.C., and has been in France since, with the exception of one week, which he spent at home on leave. Private Innes was also wounded in the recent advance, but is now progressing favourably. He is in a convalescent camp at Boulogne. A keen football player, he was a prominent member of the old Shopboys Club.

Handwritten notes on entry:
“Mother died 31.1.21”
“Wounded Nov. 17” [C. T. Innes]
“Killed 23.2.17” [D. R. Innes]

No photo available

Second Lieutenant Donald A. Innes

Date of Paper: 14.09.1917
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Donald A.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

Above will be found reproduced photographs of three Muir of Ord Seaforths, sons of the lateMr Duncan Innes, and Mrs Innes, Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord.

2/Lieutenant Donald A. Innes who is 31 years of age, was previous to the outbreak of war in the office of Messrs James Watson and Coy., Ltd., Ord Distillery. He mobilised with the County Territorial Battalion in August, 1914, when he held the rank of colour-sergeant. He has completed 11 years service, having been in the old volunteers previous to the adoption of the territorial system. He served with the battalion in France in 1914-15, when he was invalided home after Neuve Chapelle. While at home he received his commission, and after training he went out again in June of this year, and was severely wounded in the advance of 31st July. He has, unfortunately, lost a leg, but the latest information is that he is progressing favourably.

Lance Corporal. C. T. Innes, Seaforths, who is 29 years of age, previous to joining the county battalion early this year was employed in the tramway department of the Glasgow Corporation. Like his officer brother he went to France early in June, and the latest report is that he is safe and well.

Private D. R. Innes, previously Seaforths, now Machine Gun Corps, is 26 years of age. Prior to the outbreak of war he was an assistant with Messrs Young and Chapman, drapers, Dingwall, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr George Urquhart, their predecessor. He mobilised with the county battalion, proceeding with it to France in November, 1914. Subsequently he was transferred to the M.G.C., and has been in France since, with the exception of one week, which he spent at home on leave. Private Innes was also wounded in the recent advance, but is now progressing favourably. He is in a convalescent camp at Boulogne. A keen football player, he was a prominent member of the old Shopboys Club.

Handwritten notes on entry:
“Mother died 31.1.21”
“Wounded Nov. 17” [C. T. Innes]
“Killed 23.2.17” [D. R. Innes]

No photo available

Private Duncan Robert Innes

Date of Paper: 14.09.1917 and 14.12.1917
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Duncan Robert
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths / Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord

Above will be found reproduced photographs of three Muir of Ord Seaforths, sons of the lateMr Duncan Innes, and Mrs Innes, Benview, Balvaird, Muir of Ord.

2/Lieutenant Donald A. Innes who is 31 years of age, was previous to the outbreak of war in the office of Messrs James Watson and Coy., Ltd., Ord Distillery. He mobilised with the County Territorial Battalion in August, 1914, when he held the rank of colour-sergeant. He has completed 11 years service, having been in the old volunteers previous to the adoption of the territorial system. He served with the battalion in France in 1914-15, when he was invalided home after Neuve Chapelle. While at home he received his commission, and after training he went out again in June of this year, and was severely wounded in the advance of 31st July. He has, unfortunately, lost a leg, but the latest information is that he is progressing favourably.

Lance Corporal. C. T. Innes, Seaforths, who is 29 years of age, previous to joining the county battalion early this year was employed in the tramway department of the Glasgow Corporation. Like his officer brother he went to France early in June, and the latest report is that he is safe and well.

Private D. R. Innes, previously Seaforths, now Machine Gun Corps, is 26 years of age. Prior to the outbreak of war he was an assistant with Messrs Young and Chapman, drapers, Dingwall, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr George Urquhart, their predecessor. He mobilised with the county battalion, proceeding with it to France in November, 1914. Subsequently he was transferred to the M.G.C., and has been in France since, with the exception of one week, which he spent at home on leave. Private Innes was also wounded in the recent advance, but is now progressing favourably. He is in a convalescent camp at Boulogne. A keen football player, he was a prominent member of the old Shopboys Club.

Handwritten notes on entry:
“Mother died 31.1.21”
“Wounded Nov. 17” [C. T. Innes]
“Killed 23.2.17” [D. R. Innes]

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

News has been received that Private Duncan Robert Innes, M.G.C., formerly of the Seaforths, a son of the late Mr Duncan Innes, and Mrs Innes, Benview, Muir of Ord, one of three brothers serving, was killed in the recent fighting. It deepens the great sorrow of this bereavement that the widowed mother of the dead soldier was already rendered anxious by the fact that both her other two sons are suffering from wounds. 2/Lt. Donald A Innes, Seaforths, having lost a limb, is lying in a Liverpool hospital, while the other son, L/Corpl. C. T. Innes, Seaforths, was wounded in the recent fighting.

Pte. Duncan Robert Innes, who has just made the supreme sacrifice, was the younger of the three Seaforth brothers. He was 26 years of age. Mobilising with the county regiment at the outbreak of war, he went to France on 4th November, 1914, to help the old Army in its terrible struggle. Subsequently he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps, and through all these strenuous times, in many bitter fights, with the exception of one week spent on leave at home in his native Ross-shire, he has been on the Western Front. He was wounded during the past summer, but after a period of treatment in France returned to his unit. Prior to the war, Pte Innes was a draper in Dingwall, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr George Urquhart. Subsequently he was employed in the same business by Messrs Young & Chapman. He is well-remembered by younger Dingwallians, having been a keen football player and a member of the old Shopboys’ combination. A fine, manly lad, honourable and straight, his death is widely regretted, and the tenderest sympathy goes out to the bereaved mother and the rest of the family.

Photo: #6414

Lisle Louis, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Sergeant Louis Lisle

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Lisle
First Name(s): Louis
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Ord Distillery, Muir Of Ord

Lisle, Sergt. Louis, 1561, was the older son of Mr and Mrs Lisle, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. He was 23 years of age, and was employed at the Ord Distillery previous to the war.

Photo: #6372

Lumsden J, Cadet, Muir Of Ord

Cadet J. Lumsden

Date of Paper: 21.02.1919
Surname: Lumsden
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Cadet
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Balvaird, Muir of Ord

A SEAFORTH HIGHLANDER IN EGYPT

Cadet J. Lumsden, Seaforth Highlanders, of whom we reproduce a photograph, writes an interesting letter to his mother of a trip down the Nile during the Christmas recess in his Cadet School in Cairo. Cadet J. Lumsden is the son of Mr and Mrs J. Lumsden, Balvaird, Muir of Ord. He was educated at Muir of Ord and at the Dingwall Academy. At the outbreak of war he immediately enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders, and, after training at Bedford, he proceeded with the battalion to France in November, 1914. He took part in the battle of Neuve Chapelle, where so many of the gallant sons of Ross fell, but he was not so fortunate at Festubert in May 1915. There he was severely wounded and sent to “Blighty”. After spending six months in hospital he was able to report for further service. This time, on being declared fit, he was posted to the premier battalion of the Seaforths in the East. In both Mesopotamia and Palestine he saw much active service. Subsequently he was sent to a Cadet School in Cairo to prepare for a commission, and he was there when the Armistice was signed.

Coy. Sergt.-Major Lumsden, another son of Mr and Mrs Lumsden, has just returned from Germany, where he had been a prisoner of war for nine months.

In his letter home, Cadet Lumsden writes from Luxor as follows:- “I am having a few days hoilday – the time of my life – in this, one of the most interesting places in a country full of interest dating back for ages. We cadets are having a half-term holiday of seven days and I invested the little money I had to spare in a journey, the experiences of which I shall never forget not regret. Well, Luxor, where I am just now, is 450 miles south of Cairo, and we arrived after an all night train journey. The climate is altogther milder than it is in Cairo, where I left, it was decidedly chilly, especially at nights. We were met at Luxor station by a guide and the inevitable complement of native attendants, and a two horse buggy. We drove through the town to the Savoy Hotel, a fine building standing in its own grounds on the banks of the Nile. It is a lovely place, but the best bit is to see the sunset behind the hills away across the beautiful valley of the Nile, each feature lending its particular colour to the water of the river stretching from one’s feet a distance of three-quarters of a mile to the other bank. The land on the banks of the river is cultivated with extreme diligence, water being supplied by countless irrigation canals and channels.

 

“I visited the Temple of Luxor (or Thebes), which dates from the 18th dynasty or 1400 to 1650 years before Christ. In it are contained statues of Rameses II, and his Queen, the father and mother of Pharaoh, who was drowned in the Red Sea in pursuit of the Children of Israel. The figures and hieroglyphics on the walls are simply marvellous, and we were fortunate in having a good guide, who explained things pretty clearly. I also visited the Temple of Kavnah with its 10 pylons and many colurmns, the whole covering 104 acres of ground. In one part of the temple alone there are 134 colums about 80 ft. high, and covered with the histories of their erectors. Truly the ancient Egyptians were a painstaking race, as these marvellous monuments show. At Kavnah there are two temples and two holy lakes, one for the men and boys to worship in, and one for the women folk. The holy lake was the scene of a funeral ceremony while we were there. The boat containing the coffin of a dead person was rowed seven times round the lake, then the coffin was laid before the Scaraph, or emblem of eternal life, being the body of a beetle carved in stone, and thence carried through the temple to the city of dead across the river. These people had two cities, one of the living on this, the eastern side of the river, the other of the dead on the western side. Connecting these two temples of Thebes and Kavnah there is an aveune of Sphinx 1 1/2 miles long, and along this the high priests make a procession once a year, with the sacred boats of the Trinity, the god of the morning sun, the goddess of the earth, and their son the god of the moon, and the ceremony included sacrifices and all the extras, including the burning of incense.

“Another day I crossed the river and had a 20 mile journey on donkeys, visiting the Tomb of the Kings, wonderful places right underneath hills of limestone. Every one of these tombs is beautifully inscribed in hieroglyphics and figures with the histories of each individual, giving accounts of the countries conquered, slaves taken, trees, cattle, gold, and other precious minerals brought back. In one there is still the embalmed bodies of 3 valets (2 women and 1 man) of a king, who died over 300 years ago. These valets were killed at his death, so as to attend to him on the other side. The hair of the women is still in good condition.

“The temples of Ramassion and Gurnah I also visited and two huge statues of the god Osiris and his goddess.”

Photo: #6390

Macculloch Angus, Pte, Stirling Ex Muir Of Ord

Private Angus Macculloch

Date of Paper: 18.01.1918
Surname: Macculloch
Forename: Angus
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Pte. John Macculloch, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Macculloch, Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord, who was reported killed on the 12th October, 1917. Pte. Macculloch joined up in June 1916, proceeding to France in October. He was engaged as head gardener at Milngavie.

Pte. Macculloch is survived by a widow and young family, who reside in Stirlingshire, with whom and with his parents and brothers and sisters deep sympathy is felt.

2/Lt. R. Hunter, in a letter to the widow, says: “He was killed by enemy rifle fire while advancing to the attack under trying conditions. I regret his death very much: he is missed by all his comrades.” The C.S.M., in a letter, says: “He suffered no pain and died instantaneously. I sincerely hope this note may help to soften the blow when official information reaches you.”

A younger brother, Pte. Angus Macculloch, Seaforths (whose photograph also appears), has been serving in France since 1914, and so far has come through without a scratch.

See entry below for details of his brother John Macculloch

Photo: #6399

Macculloch John, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private John Macculloch

Date of Paper: 18.01.1918
Surname: Macculloch
Forename: John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address: Stirling (formerly Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord)

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Pte. John Macculloch, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Macculloch, Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord, who was reported killed on the 12th October, 1917. Pte. Macculloch joined up in June 1916, proceeding to France in October. He was engaged as head gardener at Milngavie.

Pte. Macculloch is survived by a widow and young family, who reside in Stirlingshire, with whom and with his parents and brothers and sisters deep sympathy is felt.

2/Lt. R. Hunter, in a letter to the widow, says: “He was killed by enemy rifle fire while advancing to the attack under trying conditions. I regret his death very much: he is missed by all his comrades.” The C.S.M., in a letter, says: “He suffered no pain and died instantaneously. I sincerely hope this note may help to soften the blow when official information reaches you.”

A younger brother, Pte. Angus Macculloch, Seaforths (whose photograph also appears), has been serving in France since 1914, and so far has come through without a scratch.

See entry above for details of his brother Angus Macculloch