Muir of Ord WW I page 5

Attribution: Image by Bruce Mewett from Pixabay

You are welcome to comment on these pictures

Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society welcome further information and comments about any person or photos on our website. Adding a comment means that you accept our Privacy Policy.

Photo: #6388

Mackintosh Alexander, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Alexander Mackintosh

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Mackintosh
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Muir of Ord

Mackintosh, Private Alexander, 1225, C (Black Isle) Coy., wounded 11th March, 1915, died of wounds same day; son of Mrs Mackintosh, widow, Ivy Cottage, Muir of Ord, he was in his 20th year. He was employed in the Ord Distillery.

Photo: #6381

Mackintosh Duncan, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal Duncan Mackintosh

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Mackintosh
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Seafield, Muir of Ord

THE LATE L-C. DUNCAN MACKINTOSH, MUIR OF ORD

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of Lance-Corporal Duncan Mackintosh, Seaforths, who fell in action on April 9th somewhere in France. Deceased was the third son of Mr and Mrs Duncan Mackintosh, Seafield, Muir of Ord. He was only 20 years of age. In November, 1914, he went to the Front with his battalion. He had been in all its stiffer trials. Twice he was wounded, twice returned to England, on each occasion finding himself soon back again in the line. A cheery, lovable fellow, Duncan was a general favourite and he will be missed and mourned by his comrades in billets and in the line. At home there is in Muir of Ord much sorrow at his death, and deep sympathy with his parents and brothers and sisters. Another brother is with the colours.

Photo: #6412

Maclean John, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Sergeant John Maclean

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lovat Cottage, Muir of Ord

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of Sergt. John Maclean, Seaforths (Regulars), Muir of Ord, the eldest son of Mr Alexander Maclean, Lovat Cottage, Muir of Ord, who was killed in action on October 4, 1917, on the Western Front. Previous to joining up the B.E.F. at the outbreak of war, Sergt, Maclean was for three years a police constable in Prestwick, Ayrshire. Expecting when recovering from wounds received in April, 1915, he had been continuously on active service since the outbreak of war, and had more war experience than many, being one of the few men remaining with his unit who had been through it all.

Captain Hector C.S. Munro, writing to the father of deceased, in a kind and sympathetic letter, says: “Your son was a true Highlander and a splendid type of man in every way. He was beloved alike by both officers and men, and his loss is sadly felt. I was particularly fond of him, and had known him since the early days of the war, and I daresay it was because we both came from the same part of Ross-shire that made me admire him more. Any battalion would have been proud to have had such a man in its ranks and I know that this battalion was. I feel it a great honour to have known such a gallant fellow”.

The Rev. J. Gray, C.F., in a letter states that Sergt. Maclean was hit after his company had reached its objective, and when he was carrying a message back to the commanding officer. He handed over the message to the man who accompanied him and very soon afterwards passed away. “In action,” says the Chaplain, “he was brave and courageous and had a splendid influence on the men”.

Photo: #6401

Macleod John, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private John Macleod

Date of Paper: 26.09.1919
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: H.L.I.
Home Address: Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord

MUIR OF ORD SOLDIER DIES IN MESOPOTAMIA

One of the Mesopotamia heroes was the late Private John Macleod, HLI, a son of Mr and Mrs John Macleod, Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord, who, after only one day’s illness, died of that dreadful disease, cholera. He joined the colours in February, 1916, and was posted to the HLI. After training he was drafted to the East from which he was never to return. He was 29 years of age, and prior to enlisting was employed as a farm servant. Two of his brothers were also with the colours, Sergt. Robert Macleod, Camerons, and Corpl. Wm. Macleod, RGA. A photograph of Pte. John Macleod is reproduced above.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Sergeant Robert Macleod

Date of Paper: 26.09.1919
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord

MUIR OF ORD SOLDIER DIES IN MESOPOTAMIA

One of the Mesopotamia heroes was the late Private John Macleod, HLI, a son of Mr and Mrs John Macleod, Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord, who, after only one day’s illness, died of that dreadful disease, cholera. He joined the colours in February, 1916, and was posted to the HLI. After training he was drafted to the East from which he was never to return. He was 29 years of age, and prior to enlisting was employed as a farm servant. Two of his brothers were also with the colours, Sergt. Robert Macleod, Camerons, and Corpl. Wm. Macleod, RGA. A photograph of Pte. John Macleod is reproduced above.

See entries above & below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Corporal William Macleod

Date of Paper: 26.09.1919
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: R.G.A.
Home Address: Ardnagrask, Muit of Ord

MUIR OF ORD SOLDIER DIES IN MESOPOTAMIA

One of the Mesopotamia heroes was the late Private John Macleod, HLI, a son of Mr and Mrs John Macleod, Ardnagrask, Muir of Ord, who, after only one day’s illness, died of that dreadful disease, cholera. He joined the colours in February, 1916, and was posted to the HLI. After training he was drafted to the East from which he was never to return. He was 29 years of age, and prior to enlisting was employed as a farm servant. Two of his brothers were also with the colours, Sergt. Robert Macleod, Camerons, and Corpl. Wm. Macleod, RGA. A photograph of Pte. John Macleod is reproduced above.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6406

Macphail William, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private William Macphail

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Macphail
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balvaird, Muir of Ord

THE LATE PTE. W. MACPHAIL, MUIR OF ORD

Pte. William Macphail, Seaforths, whose portrait appears today, and who, as has already been reported, was killed in action on 16th November, was the son of Mr and Mrs Macphail, Balvaird, Muir of Ord. He joined the Seaforths in March 1916, previous to which he was a grocer with Mr William Forbes, Muir of Ord. Only 19 years of age, he was drafted to France in August.

Captain Harrop, in a letter to Mrs Macphail, says: “He was killed while proceeding to hold some newly won trenches. It may be some consolation to you to know that his death was instantaneous and that, therefore, he suffered no pain. His section miss him immensely, for he was a great favourite, and, as his officer, I know that I have lost one of my cheeriest and most competent gunners.”

The Rev. John Macleod, C.F. (Free Church minister of Urray), who also wrote to Mrs Macphail, in course of a most comforting letter, says: “He was killed in action and buried on the battlefield, it being impossible to remove the body to one of the cemeteries behind the lines, so we were obliged to place all that was mortal of him with his fallen comrades near the spot where he fell. I was able to conduct a short service at the grave, and my prayers and sympathy were in your direction. Your boy did his duty nobly, and he fell like a British soldier. I shall (D.V.) be home soon and hope to see you.”

Photo: #6395

Manson J, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private J. Manson

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Manson
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Mackintosh Buildings, Muir of Ord

Manson, Private J., 1333 (29), first reported wounded, was subsequently reported missing, and, as in other cases, death has since been presumed.

The son of Mr Charles Manson, Mackintosh Buildings, Muir of Ord, he was a groom, and employed at Strathpeffer.

Photo: #6166

Munro Alexander, Pte, Fairburn

Private Alexander Munro

Date of Paper: 18.04.1919
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Westminster Dragoons
Home Address: Fairburn Muir, Muir of Ord

FAIRBURN WIDOW'S SAD LOSS

Reproduced in this week’s paper are the photographs of three sons of widow Ann Munro, Fairburn Muir, Muir of Ord, who served in the European War.

Private John Munro was employed by Lieut. John Stirling of Fairburn until he came of military age in 1916, when he immediately enlisted in the County Territorial Battalion. He received his initial training at Ripon, but was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. In April 1917 he went to France, being attached to the Guards Division. He was only a month at the front when he fell at Arras on 6th May, 1917.

Private Alexander Munro was a mail driver between Muir of Ord and Strathconon. He had just reached his majority when in January 1916 he joined the Westminster Dragoons, and was trained at Aldershot. He went to France the same year , but had not been long out before he contracted pneumonia, and was invalided home. Recovering, he was next sent to Egypt. Just as he started his journey he had a relapse, and was put into the Stationary Hospital at Marseilles, where he died on the 24th March, 1917.

Private William Munro, Seaforth Highlanders, 22 years of age, enlisted under the Derby scheme. Following the occupation of a wood feller, he was doing valuable work at home. The necessity for more men, however, claimed him, and he answered the “call” in July 1918. He was in training at Cromarty when the Armistice was signed. He is now doing duty guarding German prisoners of war.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6167

Mackenzie John, Pte, Fairburn

Private John Munro

Date of Paper: 22.06.1917
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps / Guards Division
Home Address: Fairburn, Muir of Ord

A FAIRBURN FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

As briefly reported recently, Widow Munro, Fairburn Muir, has received intimation that her son, Pte. John Munro, Machine Gun Corps, was killed in action in France on May 6th, 1917. Prior to enlistment he was employed with Captain Stirling of Fairburn. Joining the Seaforths in September 1916, after four months’ training he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps, and recently was drafted to France. A kind, cheerful, and promising young fellow, he was a favourite with all. His early death is keenly felt in the Fairburn district, and great sympathy is extended to his widowed mother and brothers in their sore bereavement, they having only a short time ago suffered the loss of an elder brother while on active service. A photograph appears today.

FAIRBURN WIDOW'S SAD LOSS

Date of Paper: 18.04.1919

Reproduced in this week’s paper are the photographs of three sons of widow Ann Munro, Fairburn Muir, Muir of Ord, who served in the European War.

Private John Munro was employed by Lieut. John Stirling of Fairburn until he came of military age in 1916, when he immediately enlisted in the County Territorial Battalion. He received his initial training at Ripon, but was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. In April 1917 he went to France, being attached to the Guards Division. He was only a month at the front when he fell at Arras on 6th May, 1917.

Private Alexander Munro was a mail driver between Muir of Ord and Strathconon. He had just reached his majority when in January 1916 he joined the Westminster Dragoons, and was trained at Aldershot. He went to France the same year , but had not been long out before he contracted pneumonia, and was invalided home. Recovering, he was next sent to Egypt. Just as he started his journey he had a relapse, and was put into the Stationary Hospital at Marseilles, where he died on the 24th March, 1917.

Private William Munro, Seaforth Highlanders, 22 years of age, enlisted under the Derby scheme. Following the occupation of a wood feller, he was doing valuable work at home. The necessity for more men, however, claimed him, and he answered the “call” in July 1918. He was in training at Cromarty when the Armistice was signed. He is now doing duty guarding German prisoners of war.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6168

Munro William, Pte, Fairburn

Private William Munro

Date of Paper: 18.04.1919
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Fairburn Muir, Muir of Ord

FAIRBURN WIDOW'S SAD LOSS

Reproduced in this week’s paper are the photographs of three sons of widow Ann Munro, Fairburn Muir, Muir of Ord, who served in the European War.

Private John Munro was employed by Lieut. John Stirling of Fairburn until he came of military age in 1916, when he immediately enlisted in the County Territorial Battalion. He received his initial training at Ripon, but was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. In April 1917 he went to France, being attached to the Guards Division. He was only a month at the front when he fell at Arras on 6th May, 1917.

Private Alexander Munro was a mail driver between Muir of Ord and Strathconon. He had just reached his majority when in January 1916 he joined the Westminster Dragoons, and was trained at Aldershot. He went to France the same year , but had not been long out before he contracted pneumonia, and was invalided home. Recovering, he was next sent to Egypt. Just as he started his journey he had a relapse, and was put into the Stationary Hospital at Marseilles, where he died on the 24th March, 1917.

Private William Munro, Seaforth Highlanders, 22 years of age, enlisted under the Derby scheme. Following the occupation of a wood feller, he was doing valuable work at home. The necessity for more men, however, claimed him, and he answered the “call” in July 1918. He was in training at Cromarty when the Armistice was signed. He is now doing duty guarding German prisoners of war.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6409

Ross John, Sgt, Muir Of Ord

Sergeant John Ross

Date of Paper: 19.07.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Muir of Conon, Muir of Ord

A MUIR OF ORD SEAFORTH

There is reproduced today a photo of Sergt. John Ross, Seaforths, who was recently home on leave at Muir of Conon, Muir of Ord, where his wife resides. Sgt. Ross joined the 4th Seaforths in 1912, and mobilised with the battalion in August 1914, proceeding to Bedford on 15th August. In November 1914 he was promoted sergeant, and retained for special training purposes. In April 1916 he was posted for service in France, reverting to private, but subsequently receiving back his stripes. He served throughout the remainder of 1916, and throughout 1917. Time-expired in December, his leave was deferred until May last, on the expiry of which he returned to the line. Sergt. Ross passed unscathed through the agony of the first days of the German offensive, and was with his battalion in that heroic stand when by its gallantry it saved the flank of a neighbouring division, and was specially mentioned for its great work. He shared in subsequent fighting before coming home. Sergt. Ross is a popular personality in the battalion.

A native of Jamestown, Ross-shire, he has a croft at Muir of Conon, which, after war, let us be hoped, will swell into a farm worthy of his record and sacrifice. Sergt. Ross is 34 years of age.

Photo: #6407

Taylor William, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private William Taylor

Date of Paper: 21.03.1919
Surname: Taylor
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Bank Cottage, Muir Of Ord

THE LATE PTE. WM. TAYLOR, MUIR OF ORD

DIES AS A PRISONER OF WAR

Information has now been received of the death as a prisoner of war in Germany of Private William Taylor, Highland Light Infantry, only son of Mr Wm. Taylor, foreman porter, Muir of Ord Station, and Mrs Taylor, Bank Cottage, Muir of Ord. Private Taylor was taken prisoner at Levantie, France, on 9th April, 1918, and letters were received subsequently from him at regular intervals unit 8th October last. In their anxiety the parents tried every source of information but without success, until last week when a letter was received from a repatriated prisoner of war in Scotland who sent a copy of a German notice intimating that Pte. Taylor had died in hospital at Scheuen-Celle at 2.pm. on the afternoon of the 5th November, 1918, and that the remains were buried in the cemetery in connection with the hospital on the 8th November.

Much sympathy will be expressed with the bereaved parents in the loss of a loving and dutiful son.
A native of Wick, deceased came to Muir of Ord when two years of age. He was educated at Muir of Ord and latterly at the Dingwall Academy, following which he was studying privately for the Civil Service. When he became of military age he immediately volunteered, and received his training at Montrose, Kirkcaldy, Killine Camp, Holt, and Cromer. In January, 1918, he was sent to France where he served through much heavy fighting with the H.L.I. unit he fell into Germany hands in April. He was a very promising boy, possessed of an exceptionally affectionate and quiet disposition, and many friends regret his untimely death.

A photograph appears in this issue.

Photo: #6415

Tuach Roderick, Sgt, Canada Ex Muir Of Ord

Sergeant Roderick Tuach

Date of Paper: 26.01.1917
Surname: Tuach
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Canada (formerly Forest Hill Cottage, Muir Of Ord)

MILITARY MEDAL FOR MUIR OF ORD CANADIAN

Sergeant Roderick Tuach, Forest Hill Cottage, Muir of Ord , son of Mr William Tuach, mason contractor, has been awared the Military Medal for bravery and devotion to duty on the field, and has received the congratulations of his many friends and comrades. Sergt.Tuach emigrated to Canada about four years ago, and shortly after the outbreak of war joined the Army in Vancouver, from whence he was transferred to England, and ultimately to France. Before going to Canada, Sergt. Tuach was a member of the Territorial, 4th Seaforths, of which he was colour-sergeant, and will be remembered as one of the leading shots in the battalion during his time. Sergt. Tuach was severely wounded in June at the engagement at which he won his decoration, and since then has been in hospital in England, where his many friends will be glad to know he is making progress towards recovery.

A younger brother, Mr Donald Tuach, also joined the forces, but died in October last from pneumonia when undergoing training in Yorkshire.

A photograph of Sergt. Tuach is reproduced.

Photo: #6397

Tulloch James, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private James Tulloch

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917
Surname: Tulloch
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment-: King’s Own Scottish Borderers
Home Address: Arcan, Fairburn, Muir of Ord

THE LATE PTE. JAS. TULLOCH, K.O.S.B.

Pte. James Tulloch, K.O.S.B., who was killed in action in France on 9th April, was a son of Mr and Mrs James Tulloch, Arcan, Fairburn, Muir of Ord. Joining the Scottish Horse about February 1916, five months ago he transferred to the K.O.S.B., and proceeded at once to France. Deceased, who was only 23 years of age, is highly spoken of the district. A singularly nice, agreeable, and amiable fellow, he was popular in the best sense. His loss is much regretted, and sympathy goes out freely to the father, mother, and family at Arcan, who feel sorely so sudden a bereavement. A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6389

Urquhart Alexander, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Alexander Urquhart

Date of Paper: 27.10.1916
Surname: Urquhart
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Balvaird, Muir Of Ord

The above is a portait of 150660 Private Alex. Urquhart, who was killed on September 26th. A son of Mr James Urquhart, crofter, Balvaird, Muir of Ord, Private Urquhart had been several years in Canada, where he held a position in the offices of the local authorities in Winnipeg, and in which town his brother James was serving in the police force until he joined the first Canadian Contingent. Pte Urquhart crossed to Britain about a year ago, and spent a short furlough at Balvaird last New Year. Since then he has been serving on the Western Front.

Another brother, Corporal William Urquhart, is in the Black Watch and is also overseas at present.