Muir of Ord WW I page 3

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Photo: #6417

Macdonald Alexander S, Lieut, Mulbuie

Lieutenant Alexander S. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 19.11.1915
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Alexander S.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Australian Artillery
Home Address: Rootfield, Muir of Ord

The above is a photograph of Mr Alex. S. Macdonald, son of Mr Wm. Macdonald, Rootfield, Dingwall, and nephew of the late General Sir Hector Macdonald, D.S.O., who gave up a splendid Government position in Sydney, Australia, to do his duty by his home country.

Mr A. S. Macdonald is attached to the Artillery Section as Battery Director, in which connection there is a large amount of theoretical calculations and considerable risk observing the enemy.
Mr Macdonald was a distinguished student of the Glasgow Technical College in Civil Engineering, and previous to his Sydney appointment held an important position as engineer in the extensive harbour works erected at Para, Brazil.

Date of Paper: 01.09.1916

Above is reproduced a portrait of Lieutenant Alexander S. Macdonald, Australian Artillery, and a nephew of the late General Sir Hector Macdonald. As reported last week, Mr William Macdonald, Rootfield, Muir of Ord, has been informed that his son is lying in No. 3 Hospital, Wandsworth, London, suffering from wounds recently received in action, and, although without definitive information as to the nature and extent of the wounds, Mr Macdonald has been reassured by his brother, resident in London, that the young lieutenant will by and by be able to come North.
As already reported, Lieutenant Macdonald before the war was a civil engineer. Educated at Mulbuie School and Dingwall Academy, he entered the office of Mr Reid, C.E., Inverness, and qualified after a four years’ apprenticeship. This completed he entered the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College, and took his degree with distinction, gaining the Hart Scholarship for two years and the prize awarded to the most successful student of the diploma course in civil engineering. Subsequently he took the A.M.I.C.E. and the M.R.S.I. degrees. His class records are distinguished.

On qualifying, Lieutenant Macdonald obtained a remarkably good appointment in Brazil, and from thence proceeded to British Columbia. As already recorded, the war found him prompt to respond to the martial record of his family. Disappointed at not being able to join the first Canadian Contingent, he crossed to Australia on a Government appointment, which, soon after his arrival, he resigned to come to Europe as a private in the Australian Expeditionary Force. On reaching the home country his qualifications pointed him out for promotion; and he received a commission in the Australian Artillery, for which his training pre-eminently equipped him in many essential ways.
Lieutenant Macdonald is 27 years of age. His many friends will wish him a complete and speedy recovery.

Photo: #6416

Macdonald Alick D, Trooper, Muir Of Ord

Trooper Alick D. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Alick D.
Rank: Trooper
Regiment: 3/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

TWO LOVAT SCOUTS AND A 4th SEAFORTH

Mr D Macdonald, Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord, is proud of his three sons, who are serving with the colours; and he deserves the congratulations of everyone. Two of them are in the Lovat Scouts and one in the 1/4th Seaforths. The second son, James, was wounded at the end of last year, but is now doing well.

The eldest son is Alick D. Macdonald, who joined the 3/2nd Lovat Scouts in September last, and after four months’ training is on the eve of leaving for the front. Alick Macdonald occupied a lucrative position in the London and Brazilian Bank at Sao Paulo, which, after serving for the past five years, he gave up to come home and fight for his country. He served his apprenticeship as a banker with Mr Simon Macdonald, late agent of the Commercial Bank Beauly, and now of the Inverness branch. The best wishes go out to this young soldier in his self-imposed task.

Lance Corporal James Macdonald is also a Lovat Scout, being attached to the 1/2nd regiment. A farmer by occupation he went to his regiment on mobilisation, and after a prolonged sojourn in England proceeded to the Dardanelles, where his regiment did such good work He was wounded on 12th December last, and for some time was in hospital at Malta. He has made a good recovery, and on 2nd February he was removed to the Mellieha Camp, Malta. His wound was in the left shoulder. By this time he may have rejoined his regiment.

The third son, 1495 Sergeant Hector Macdonald, was with the 1/4th Seaforths, but was invalided home last November with enteric fever. He has now completely recovered, and has rejoined with the 3/4th Seaforths. Sergeant Macdonald served his apprenticeship in the Commercial Bank, Muir of Ord, and subsequently was in the Dingwall branch. He joined the county territorial regiment on mobilisation, and after training at Bedford went to France in November 1914. For fully a year he was with the battalion, and although he was through all the principal engagements he never received a scratch, and it was not till the terrible scourge, enteric, got him that he was compelled to leave his battalion.

Above we reproduce the photographs of the three Macdonalds.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6386

Macdonald Hector, Lieut, Muir Of Ord

Photo: #6413

Macdonald Hector, Sgt Lieut, Muir Of Ord

Sergeant Hector Macdonald

Date of Paper: 31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Hector
Rank: Sergeant (Lieut. 23.8.18)
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

TWO LOVAT SCOUTS AND A 4th SEAFORTH

Mr D Macdonald, Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord, is proud of his three sons, who are serving with the colours; and he deserves the congratulations of everyone. Two of them are in the Lovat Scouts and one in the 1/4th Seaforths. The second son, James, was wounded at the end of last year, but is now doing well.

The eldest son is Alick D. Macdonald, who joined the 3/2nd Lovat Scouts in September last, and after four months’ training is on the eve of leaving for the front. Alick Macdonald occupied a lucrative position in the London and Brazilian Bank at Sao Paulo, which, after serving for the past five years, he gave up to come home and fight for his country. He served his apprenticeship as a banker with Mr Simon Macdonald, late agent of the Commercial Bank Beauly, and now of the Inverness branch. The best wishes go out to this young soldier in his self-imposed task.

Lance Corporal James Macdonald is also a Lovat Scout, being attached to the 1/2nd regiment. A farmer by occupation he went to his regiment on mobilisation, and after a prolonged sojourn in England proceeded to the Dardanelles, where his regiment did such good work He was wounded on 12th December last, and for some time was in hospital at Malta. He has made a good recovery, and on 2nd February he was removed to the Mellieha Camp, Malta. His wound was in the left shoulder. By this time he may have rejoined his regiment.

The third son, 1495 Sergeant Hector Macdonald, was with the 1/4th Seaforths, but was invalided home last November with enteric fever. He has now completely recovered, and has rejoined with the 3/4th Seaforths. Sergeant Macdonald served his apprenticeship in the Commercial Bank, Muir of Ord, and subsequently was in the Dingwall branch. He joined the county territorial regiment on mobilisation, and after training at Bedford went to France in November 1914. For fully a year he was with the battalion, and although he was through all the principal engagements he never received a scratch, and it was not till the terrible scourge, enteric, got him that he was compelled to leave his battalion.

Above we reproduce the photographs of the three Macdonalds.

See entries below for details of his brother James and entry above for his brother Alick D. Macdonald

Photo: #6382

Macdonald James, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal James Macdonald

Date of Paper: 31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): James
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 1/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

TWO LOVAT SCOUTS AND A 4th SEAFORTH

Mr D Macdonald, Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord, is proud of his three sons, who are serving with the colours; and he deserves the congratulations of everyone. Two of them are in the Lovat Scouts and one in the 1/4th Seaforths. The second son, James, was wounded at the end of last year, but is now doing well.

The eldest son is Alick D. Macdonald, who joined the 3/2nd Lovat Scouts in September last, and after four months’ training is on the eve of leaving for the front. Alick Macdonald occupied a lucrative position in the London and Brazilian Bank at Sao Paulo, which, after serving for the past five years, he gave up to come home and fight for his country. He served his apprenticeship as a banker with Mr Simon Macdonald, late agent of the Commercial Bank Beauly, and now of the Inverness branch. The best wishes go out to this young soldier in his self-imposed task.

Lance Corporal James Macdonald is also a Lovat Scout, being attached to the 1/2nd regiment. A farmer by occupation he went to his regiment on mobilisation, and after a prolonged sojourn in England proceeded to the Dardanelles, where his regiment did such good work He was wounded on 12th December last, and for some time was in hospital at Malta. He has made a good recovery, and on 2nd February he was removed to the Mellieha Camp, Malta. His wound was in the left shoulder. By this time he may have rejoined his regiment.

The third son, 1495 Sergeant Hector Macdonald, was with the 1/4th Seaforths, but was invalided home last November with enteric fever. He has now completely recovered, and has rejoined with the 3/4th Seaforths. Sergeant Macdonald served his apprenticeship in the Commercial Bank, Muir of Ord, and subsequently was in the Dingwall branch. He joined the county territorial regiment on mobilisation, and after training at Bedford went to France in November 1914. For fully a year he was with the battalion, and although he was through all the principal engagements he never received a scratch, and it was not till the terrible scourge, enteric, got him that he was compelled to leave his battalion.

Above we reproduce the photographs of the three Macdonalds.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6374

Macdonald Duncan, Corp, Muir Of Ord

Corporal Duncan Macdonald

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Gowanfield, Muir of Ord

Corporal Duncan Macdonald, Seaforths, was killed in action on the 9th April. He was the second son of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Gowanfield, Muir of Ord. In civil life he had served an apprenticeship in the Muir of Ord and Dingwall branch of the Bank of Scotland. Shortly after being put on the permanent staff of the Bank he enlisted in the 2/4th Seaforth highlanders. In camp his aptitude and enthusiasm as a soldier marked him out for quick promotion, and before his training ended he had attained the rank of sergeant.

For service abroad Macdonald was drafted into another Seaforth battalion. In accordance with army regulations, he began in his new company as a private, and on active service also his intelligence and soldierly qualities marked him out for a distinguished career. But after nine months at the front his career has ended in the supreme sacrifice for home and country at the early age of twenty three years.

The esteem in which Corporal Macdonald was held by his Bank managers may be learned from the fact that their agent at Dingwall was instructed to convey to the bereaved friends, “their deep sympathy with them.” His officer wrote: “I feel certain that you will be proud of the unflinching manner in which your son met his death. The officers, N.C.O’s and men of his company mourn the death of one so obliging and useful.”

The sad intelligence cast quite a gloom over the district of Muir of Ord, where the fallen soldier was deservedly popular among all classes. His blameless life, and gentle manners, and gentlemanly bearing, made him the best of sons and the best of friends. He will not be readily forgotten by those who knew him, and the heartfelt sympathy of the community goes to a home that has been darkened by the loss of a son and brother so worthy of [obliterated] and affection.
A portrait of Corporal Macdonald appears today.

Photo: #6393

Macdonald Hugh F, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Hugh F. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 12.11.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Hugh F.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ord Village, Muir of Ord

Macdonald, Private Hugh F., 19 years of age, was village postman at Muir of Ord, and for three years caretaker at the Drill Hall. Quiet and obliging, he was very popular. His brother Alexander a corporal in the 1st Australian Contingent, was wounded about the same date as Hugh was killed.
Deceased was the son of Mr and Mrs James Macdonald, Ord Village.

Photo: #6383

Macdonald R, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal R. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 28.12.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): R.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: Easter Urray, Muir of Ord

Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Easter Urrqy, Muir of Ord, have received much sympathy in the death of their son, Lance-Corpl. R. Macdonald, Gordons, who was killed in action on November 20th last, while serving with the Highland Territorial Division.

A photograph of deceased appears today. Deceased, it appears, fell while helping to hold back a counter-attack and while in charge of a Lewis gun. Lce.-Corpl. Macdonald had wide experience of war. He served in the East and took part in the fighting at Gallipoli, from which he was ultimately invalided home. Later he transferred from the Camerons to the Gordons, and had been on the Western Front for some considerable time.

The Rev. David Moir, C.F., in a message to the parents, expresses the sympathy of all ranks at the death of “a good and brave comrade”. Lt. Ferguson, platoon commander, states that death was instantaneous, and that deceased could not have suffered. He writes in sympathy with the parents.

Photo: #6615

Macfarlane Andrew, Major Rev, Inverness Ex Urray

Major (Rev.) Andrew Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 08.03.1918
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name(s): Andrew
Rank: Major (Rev.)
Regiment: 2nd Black Watch
Home Address: Ness House, Inverness

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of the late Rev. John Macfarlane, so long the esteemed minister of Urray, Ross-shire, and of Mrs Macfarlane, Ness House, Inverness. All four sons have taken part in the war, and, as recently announced, the Distinguished Service Order has been conferred on the Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, Chaplain to the Forces, who has seen much service both East and West.

The Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, M.A., B.D., the eldest son, who has been awarded the D.S.O. for work in Mesopotamia, is senior chaplain, Church of Scotland, Amarah. Mr Macfarlane was a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts and Divinity, taking a specially high place in the classes devoted to Oriental studies. He was assistant at Largs and afterwards at the Cathedral, Glasgow, and was ordained there by the Rev. Dr McAdam Muir for work as a Colonial Chaplain at Secunderbad, in Sept., 1902. He has been a chaplain on the Indian Ecclestical Establishment since 1903. In 1905 he was gazetted to the Royal Highlanders, 2nd Black Watch, and served with his regiment in various parts of India. In the present war he served in France from October 1914 to November 1915, and so is eligible for the 1914 Star. He has been in Mesopotamia since the beginning of 1916, and has been at the fighting front with his regiment from the first advance of General Aylmer’s force in the attempt to relieve Kut, up to the capture of Baghdad. He was twice mentioned in the dispatches of Sir Percy Lake in 1916. More recently he has held the position, with the rank of Major, as senior chaplain to the forces, Presbyterian, with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force.

Captain James Macfarlane, second son of Mrs Macfarlane, is superintending engineer with Messrs Cowie & Co., Rangoon, and has been mobilised there in the Defence Force since the outbreak of war.

Mr John Adam Macfarlane, third son, National Bank of South Africa, went through most of the East African campaign serving with the Sportsmen’s Battalion, 9th South African Infantry, until his health broke down, when ultimately he resumed his civil duties.

Mr Walter Macfarlane, the youngest son, came from Vancouver with the 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded in the Somme battles, and was in hospital for a considerable time. He is at present on duty in a Canadian Shipping Office in London

See entries below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6612

Macfarlane James, Capt,  Inverness Ex Urray

Captain James Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 08.03.1918
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name(s): James
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Defence Force, Rangoon
Home Address: Ness House, Inverness

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of the late Rev. John Macfarlane, so long the esteemed minister of Urray, Ross-shire, and of Mrs Macfarlane, Ness House, Inverness. All four sons have taken part in the war, and, as recently announced, the Distinguished Service Order has been conferred on the Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, Chaplain to the Forces, who has seen much service both East and West.

The Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, M.A., B.D., the eldest son, who has been awarded the D.S.O. for work in Mesopotamia, is senior chaplain, Church of Scotland, Amarah. Mr Macfarlane was a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts and Divinity, taking a specially high place in the classes devoted to Oriental studies. He was assistant at Largs and afterwards at the Cathedral, Glasgow, and was ordained there by the Rev. Dr McAdam Muir for work as a Colonial Chaplain at Secunderbad, in Sept., 1902. He has been a chaplain on the Indian Ecclestical Establishment since 1903. In 1905 he was gazetted to the Royal Highlanders, 2nd Black Watch, and served with his regiment in various parts of India. In the present war he served in France from October 1914 to November 1915, and so is eligible for the 1914 Star. He has been in Mesopotamia since the beginning of 1916, and has been at the fighting front with his regiment from the first advance of General Aylmer’s force in the attempt to relieve Kut, up to the capture of Baghdad. He was twice mentioned in the dispatches of Sir Percy Lake in 1916. More recently he has held the position, with the rank of Major, as senior chaplain to the forces, Presbyterian, with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force.

Captain James Macfarlane, second son of Mrs Macfarlane, is superintending engineer with Messrs Cowie & Co., Rangoon, and has been mobilised there in the Defence Force since the outbreak of war.

Mr John Adam Macfarlane, third son, National Bank of South Africa, went through most of the East African campaign serving with the Sportsmen’s Battalion, 9th South African Infantry, until his health broke down, when ultimately he resumed his civil duties.

Mr Walter Macfarlane, the youngest son, came from Vancouver with the 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded in the Somme battles, and was in hospital for a considerable time. He is at present on duty in a Canadian Shipping Office in London

See entries above & below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6614

Macfarlane John A, South Africa Ex Inverness Ex Urray

John Adam Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 08.03.1918
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name(s): John Adam
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 9th South African Infantry
Home Address: Ness House, Inverness

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of the late Rev. John Macfarlane, so long the esteemed minister of Urray, Ross-shire, and of Mrs Macfarlane, Ness House, Inverness. All four sons have taken part in the war, and, as recently announced, the Distinguished Service Order has been conferred on the Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, Chaplain to the Forces, who has seen much service both East and West.

The Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, M.A., B.D., the eldest son, who has been awarded the D.S.O. for work in Mesopotamia, is senior chaplain, Church of Scotland, Amarah. Mr Macfarlane was a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts and Divinity, taking a specially high place in the classes devoted to Oriental studies. He was assistant at Largs and afterwards at the Cathedral, Glasgow, and was ordained there by the Rev. Dr McAdam Muir for work as a Colonial Chaplain at Secunderbad, in Sept., 1902. He has been a chaplain on the Indian Ecclestical Establishment since 1903. In 1905 he was gazetted to the Royal Highlanders, 2nd Black Watch, and served with his regiment in various parts of India. In the present war he served in France from October 1914 to November 1915, and so is eligible for the 1914 Star. He has been in Mesopotamia since the beginning of 1916, and has been at the fighting front with his regiment from the first advance of General Aylmer’s force in the attempt to relieve Kut, up to the capture of Baghdad. He was twice mentioned in the dispatches of Sir Percy Lake in 1916. More recently he has held the position, with the rank of Major, as senior chaplain to the forces, Presbyterian, with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force.

Captain James Macfarlane, second son of Mrs Macfarlane, is superintending engineer with Messrs Cowie & Co., Rangoon, and has been mobilised there in the Defence Force since the outbreak of war.

Mr John Adam Macfarlane, third son, National Bank of South Africa, went through most of the East African campaign serving with the Sportsmen’s Battalion, 9th South African Infantry, until his health broke down, when ultimately he resumed his civil duties.

Mr Walter Macfarlane, the youngest son, came from Vancouver with the 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded in the Somme battles, and was in hospital for a considerable time. He is at present on duty in a Canadian Shipping Office in London

See entries above & below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6617

Macfarlane Walter M, Canada Ex Inverness Ex Urray

Walter Macfarlane

Date(s) of Paper: 08.03.1918
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name: Walter Malcolm
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force
Home Address: Ness House, Inverness

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of the late Rev. John Macfarlane, so long the esteemed minister of Urray, Ross-shire, and of Mrs Macfarlane, Ness House, Inverness. All four sons have taken part in the war, and, as recently announced, the Distinguished Service Order has been conferred on the Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, Chaplain to the Forces, who has seen much service both East and West.

The Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, M.A., B.D., the eldest son, who has been awarded the D.S.O. for work in Mesopotamia, is senior chaplain, Church of Scotland, Amarah. Mr Macfarlane was a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts and Divinity, taking a specially high place in the classes devoted to Oriental studies. He was assistant at Largs and afterwards at the Cathedral, Glasgow, and was ordained there by the Rev. Dr McAdam Muir for work as a Colonial Chaplain at Secunderbad, in Sept., 1902. He has been a chaplain on the Indian Ecclestical Establishment since 1903. In 1905 he was gazetted to the Royal Highlanders, 2nd Black Watch, and served with his regiment in various parts of India. In the present war he served in France from October 1914 to November 1915, and so is eligible for the 1914 Star. He has been in Mesopotamia since the beginning of 1916, and has been at the fighting front with his regiment from the first advance of General Aylmer’s force in the attempt to relieve Kut, up to the capture of Baghdad. He was twice mentioned in the dispatches of Sir Percy Lake in 1916. More recently he has held the position, with the rank of Major, as senior chaplain to the forces, Presbyterian, with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force.

Captain James Macfarlane, second son of Mrs Macfarlane, is superintending engineer with Messrs Cowie & Co., Rangoon, and has been mobilised there in the Defence Force since the outbreak of war.

Mr John Adam Macfarlane, third son, National Bank of South Africa, went through most of the East African campaign serving with the Sportsmen’s Battalion, 9th South African Infantry, until his health broke down, when ultimately he resumed his civil duties.

Mr Walter Macfarlane, the youngest son, came from Vancouver with the 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded in the Somme battles, and was in hospital for a considerable time. He is at present on duty in a Canadian Shipping Office in London

See entries above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6165

Macgillivray S, Lieut, Canada Ex Fairburn

Second Lieutenant J. S. Macgillivray

Date of Paper: 27.10.1916
Surname: Macgillivray
First Name(s): J. S.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Canada (formerly Fairburn)

Official intimation has just come to hand of the death in action on 14th July of Second-Lieutenant J. S. Macgillivray, Seaforth Highlanders, previously reported wounded on that date.

Lieut. Macgillivray was the third son of Mr Angus Macgillivray, late of Fairburn, Muir of Ord, now in Winnipeg, Canada. He enlisted in the Royal Scots Greys in the year 1905, and rose to the rank of sergeant. At the outbreak of war he went with that famous regiment to France, and was wounded in the retreat from Mons, and invalided home. Rejoining his regiment, he took part in several trench engagements.

In April of this year he was promoted Second-Lieutenant for service in the field, and transferred to the Seaforth Highlanders.

His brother officers spoke highly of his capabilities as an officer, and all ranks much regret his death in action at the head of his men.

The King and Queen have graciously sent a telegram of condolence to the sorrowing parents regretting deeply the loss sustained by them and the Army by the death of their son in the service of his country.

Although reported wounded on that date, the following letter to Lieut. Macgillivray’s sister, from an officer of the Black Watch, amply proves that he had made the great sacrifice for King and Country: “I send you herewith a watch belonging to Lieut. John Macgillivray, and a letter from you to him, both of which were found on the body of the dead officer by a burying party sent out by my company in Longeval on 16th July last. I have just been discharged from hospital, and, on looking over my belongings, came across these articles, which I know would be prized by Lieut. Macgillivray’s relatives. I did not know him personally, and can give you no information about him.”

A brother officer, writing to Lieut. Macgillivray’s sister, says: “I was in command of the camp in the fight. Mac and I were the only two left out of four officers. I was on the right of the company, and the left flank had to come up a bit to get in line with me. Your brother led this advance against the house, in which were Germans, with his usual dash and courage. He was hit in this charge but kept going on till he was hit again, and, as far as I could hear, he was hit three times. At that point we were held up, and as soon as I heard he was hit I sent out some men to find him and bring him in, but they came back and said the place about where he was was full of snipers. After we settled down I went myself to try and find him, but though I stayed a long time I could find no trace of him at all. Just then I got a new attack to make, so I had to be on the move again. In this attack I got four hits, and was taken down the line. So ended the show as far as I can tell you. This was all near Longeval and Delville Wood on the 14th July.

“I assure you I feel very much for you at this time, as Mac was my best friend in the battalion ever since he joined up. We were always together, and when in billet we either slept together or shared a room. He was older and had more experience than I had, and was at all times a perfect host in himself, and inspired confidence. None of us were chicken-hearted, and so all went well with our company. His own men loved him, and would have gone anywhere with him. Cool and collected under the most cruel fire, he scoffed at death on all occasions, and set the finest example one could imagine. Well do I remember when we took a rest in the advance – we had to go 800 yards over open ground – we lit our cigarettes together in No Man’s Land, and advanced to the Boche’s line smoking.

“His experience in France we all knew, but he was reluctant to speak of what he had done, but very often he said he would never be a prisoner. One Macgillivray had already died in German hands, he said, and there never would be a second. Modest and absolutely fearless, he seemed quite at home under a hail of bullets, and nothing would upset him. He had a short way with Germans; and I assure you many went down before he fell himself.

“If it be that he is gone, I offer you my deepest sympathy, and knowing your brother as I did, I am sure he is not the one to be taken prisoner unless he was badly wounded. He was a true friend, at all times open and sincere. I have lost many a ‘pal’ in the war, but none so dear as he. A soldier of the first water, he will be missed by officers and men who are left, for he was popularity itself. Wherever he went he always showed the true spirit of the good British officer and gentleman that he was.”

Private Angus Macgillivray, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, who was with the 100th Grenadiers, Canadian Expeditionary Force, was reported missing in April 1915, and has since been officially reported killed.

Another son, Bombardier W. S. Macgillivray, is with the Artillery, while a sister is nursing the wounded.

Many people in the Fairburn district remember the Macgillivray family, including the deceased officer, and genuine sympathy [remainder obliterated].

Photo: #6379

Mackay Donald, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance-Corporal Donald Mackay

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord

Mackay, Lance-Corporal Donald, 1759, student, only son of Mr and Mrs Donald Mackay, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. Educated at Mulbuie Public School and Dingwall Academy, he was studying for the excise examination when war broke out, and he immediately joined the 1/4th Seaforths. He had a very narrow escape at Neuve Chapelle. He was 19 years of age.

Photo: #6402

Mackay K W, Pte, Banff Ex Muir Of Ord

Private K. W. Mackay

Date of Paper: 13.12.1918
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): K. W.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Muir-of-Ord

MUIR OF ORD SOLDIER KILLED

As already reported information has been received of the death in action in France of Pte. K. W. Mackay, grandson of Mrs Mackay, Burnside, Muir of Ord, and son of Mrs Crow, Knock, Banffshire. He joined the 2/1st Lovat Scouts in March, 1917, and was in training in England for twelve months, when he was sent to France, and was transferred to the Camerons and latterly to 1/6th Black Watch. Nineteen years and eight months, he was previously wounded in August last. Before joining up he was serving his apprenticeship as a gardener at Ord House, Muir of Ord. A promising young man, and a kind and lovable nature, and much respected and loved by all who knew him much sympathy is extended to Mrs Crow and Mrs Mackay and family in their sad bereavement.

Captain Fulton, Black Watch, writing to the parents says: I regret to have to tell you that your son, Pte. K.W. Mackay, was killed on 24th October near Thiant, where he lies buried. He was killed by shell fire instantly, just a short time after we had carried our objective. He had done very well that day and he will be a great loss to all in B Coy. It is very hard for you at home especially when we came out of action soon afterwards and he was one of the last casualties we had. You both have my deepest sympathy and he will always be remembered in his Company as a good friend and one who died carrying on with his duty splendidly”.

A photo appears to-day.