Muir of Ord WW I page 1

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Photo: #7136

Ballantyne David, Sergeant,

Sergeant David Ballantyne

Date of Paper: 19.05.1916
Surname: Ballantyne
First Name(s): David
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1st Australian Contingent
Home Address: Australia, ex Beauly/Muir of Ord

TWO MUIR OF ORD HEROES

Above we produce the photographs of two brothers from Muir of Ord who have given their lives for their King and country. They were two sons of Mr John Ballantyne, foreman surfaceman, Muir of Ord, who resides at Burnside Cottage, Ardnagrask, Beauly.

Sergt. David Ballantyne started life as a sailor, but was discharged as medically unfit. After a brief holiday at home he entered the mercantile service, and his duties took him all round the world. Four years ago he gave up the sea and set out for Australia, where he settled down near the goldfields at Wallaroo. He was one of the first to enlist at the outbreak of war, and he went with the first Contingent to Gallipoli, and fell as already stated on 15th May. Possessed of a loving and generous disposition, he was a great favourite with everyone he knew. He was 31 years of age.

Gunner Kenneth Ballantyne also started in the Navy, and so clever, and industrious, and persevering was he that he rose to the rank of chief gunner and a warrant officer. Like his brother, he has visited each hemisphere. He was on one of the ships which accompanied their Majesties on their Royal tour to India. For two years he was quartermaster on the British Ambassadorís yacht at Constantinople. He took part in the Heligoland Bight fight on the H.M.S. Edgar, from which he was transferred to the H.M.S. Viknor, only three weeks before she was lost. His body was washed ashore at Ballycastle, Ireland, from where it was conveyed to Portsmouth, where his wife and two children reside. The funeral took place with full naval honours. He was 33 years of age.

See entry below for details of his brother Kenneth Ballantyne

Photo: #7137

Ballantyne Kenneth, Gunner,

Gunner Kenneth Ballantyne

Date of Paper: 19.05.1916
Surname: Ballantyne
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: Portsmouth, ex Beauly/Muir of Ord

TWO MUIR OF ORD HEROES

Above we produce the photographs of two brothers from Muir of Ord who have given their lives for their King and country. They were two sons of Mr John Ballantyne, foreman surfaceman, Muir of Ord, who resides at Burnside Cottage, Ardnagrask, Beauly.

Sergt. David Ballantyne started life as a sailor, but was discharged as medically unfit. After a brief holiday at home he entered the mercantile service, and his duties took him all round the world. Four years ago he gave up the sea and set out for Australia, where he settled down near the goldfields at Wallaroo. He was one of the first to enlist at the outbreak of war, and he went with the first Contingent to Gallipoli, and fell as already stated on 15th May. Possessed of a loving and generous disposition, he was a great favourite with everyone he knew. He was 31 years of age.

Gunner Kenneth Ballantyne also started in the Navy, and so clever, and industrious, and persevering was he that he rose to the rank of chief gunner and a warrant officer. Like his brother, he has visited each hemisphere. He was on one of the ships which accompanied their Majesties on their Royal tour to India. For two years he was quartermaster on the British Ambassadorís yacht at Constantinople. He took part in the Heligoland Bight fight on the H.M.S. Edgar, from which he was transferred to the H.M.S. Viknor, only three weeks before she was lost. His body was washed ashore at Ballycastle, Ireland, from where it was conveyed to Portsmouth, where his wife and two children reside. The funeral took place with full naval honours. He was 33 years of age.

See entry above for details of his brother David Ballantyne

Photo: #6391

Barron Duncan, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Duncan Barron

Date of Paper: 11.02.1916
Surname: Barron
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord

MUIR OF ORD FAMILY'S GREAT SACRIFICE

1493 Private John Barron, C (Black Isle) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. He was one of the many Black Isle and Muir of Ord heroes who took part in the battle of Aubers Ridge on 9th May. He was severely wounded in the leg and was sent home to hospital. He arrived at Stobhill Infirmary, Glasgow, on 11th May, and latterly has been in a convalescent home in Renfrew. His wound has not yet healed, owing to an operation that had to be performed recently. His condition, however, is improving. Private Barron, who is 21 years of age, was employed as a gardener at Ord House, Muir of Ord, previous to the war.

Date of Paper: 14.06.1918

As briefly reported some time ago, Pte. Duncan Barron, Seaforths, was killed in action on the first day of the German offensive on March 21, 1918. He is the second son of Mr and Mrs James Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord, to make the supreme sacrifice, an elder son, Pte. John Barron, Seaforths, having been officially reported killed on 11th April, 1917, at the battle of Arras. Pte. Duncan Barron, who was 20 years of age, joined the Seaforths in 1916, and went to France in January, 1917. He had seen a great deal of fierce fighting in the great struggle, but hitherto seemed to bear a charmed life. In July last year, in one of the big battles, he was one of three men of his platoon to answer the roll call after the action. He was a fine soldiery fellow, with abounding enthusiasm in all his work, and no one ever undertook the duties of the Army with greater spirit and zest than he did, when the time came at which he was permitted by age to don the khaki and the tartans of his country regiment. Before the war, after a sound education at Tarradale School, Muir of Ord, he was an assistant with Mr James Maclean, merchant, Beauly, and was held in high esteem, not only by his employer, but by the community in which he served. Much loved, by his comrades in arms, respected by his officers, he is greatly mourned in his native district, where there is the deepest sympathy with a family thus doubly bereaved.

Later entry (undated):

Later entry (undated):- THE LATE LCE.-CPL. J. BARRON, SEAFORTHS, MUIR OF ORD
Lance-Corpl. John Barron, Seaforths, who has now been officially reported killed in action, on 11th April, 1917, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. Lce.-Cpl. Barron at the time of his death was one of the fast diminishing band of the 4th Seaforths that mobilised in August, 1914, and went to the front, the first regiment of the immortal Highland Territorial Division to leave its war station, in November. 14th. Lce.-Cpl. Barron was in the battles of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915, escaping scathless, and in the battle of Aubers Ridge on 9th April, 1915. In the latter engagement he was very severely wounded. In hospital at Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow, for 15 months, after several operations he recovered, and in November, 1916, he was back again in the line, in time for the Ancre. A fine type of young Highland soldier – he was only 23 years of age – he was a quiet, companionable, young fellow, much loved by all his comrades, and much mourned in his death.

A younger brother is serving in France. With the family sincere sympathy is felt, and in his home district, stricken by the devastations of war which has visited the hearts of so many people, Mr and Mrs Barron have the consolation of neighbours who know sorrow. In private life. Before the war, Lce-Cpl. Barron (whose photograph is reproduced today) was a gardener with Colonel Mackenzie of Ord, himself a soldier.

See entry below for details of his brother John Barron

Photo: #6398

Barron John, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private John Barron

Date of Paper: 11.02.1916
Surname: Barron
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord

MUIR OF ORD FAMILY'S GREAT SACRIFICE

1493 Private John Barron, C (Black Isle) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. He was one of the many Black Isle and Muir of Ord heroes who took part in the battle of Aubers Ridge on 9th May. He was severely wounded in the leg and was sent home to hospital. He arrived at Stobhill Infirmary, Glasgow, on 11th May, and latterly has been in a convalescent home in Renfrew. His wound has not yet healed, owing to an operation that had to be performed recently. His condition, however, is improving. Private Barron, who is 21 years of age, was employed as a gardener at Ord House, Muir of Ord, previous to the war.

Date of Paper: 14.06.1918

As briefly reported some time ago, Pte. Duncan Barron, Seaforths, was killed in action on the first day of the German offensive on March 21, 1918. He is the second son of Mr and Mrs James Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord, to make the supreme sacrifice, an elder son, Pte. John Barron, Seaforths, having been officially reported killed on 11th April, 1917, at the battle of Arras. Pte. Duncan Barron, who was 20 years of age, joined the Seaforths in 1916, and went to France in January, 1917. He had seen a great deal of fierce fighting in the great struggle, but hitherto seemed to bear a charmed life. In July last year, in one of the big battles, he was one of three men of his platoon to answer the roll call after the action. He was a fine soldiery fellow, with abounding enthusiasm in all his work, and no one ever undertook the duties of the Army with greater spirit and zest than he did, when the time came at which he was permitted by age to don the khaki and the tartans of his country regiment. Before the war, after a sound education at Tarradale School, Muir of Ord, he was an assistant with Mr James Maclean, merchant, Beauly, and was held in high esteem, not only by his employer, but by the community in which he served. Much loved, by his comrades in arms, respected by his officers, he is greatly mourned in his native district, where there is the deepest sympathy with a family thus doubly bereaved.

Later entry (undated):

Later entry (undated):- THE LATE LCE.-CPL. J. BARRON, SEAFORTHS, MUIR OF ORD
Lance-Corpl. John Barron, Seaforths, who has now been officially reported killed in action, on 11th April, 1917, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Barron, Ord Distillery, Muir of Ord. Lce.-Cpl. Barron at the time of his death was one of the fast diminishing band of the 4th Seaforths that mobilised in August, 1914, and went to the front, the first regiment of the immortal Highland Territorial Division to leave its war station, in November. 14th. Lce.-Cpl. Barron was in the battles of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915, escaping scathless, and in the battle of Aubers Ridge on 9th April, 1915. In the latter engagement he was very severely wounded. In hospital at Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow, for 15 months, after several operations he recovered, and in November, 1916, he was back again in the line, in time for the Ancre. A fine type of young Highland soldier – he was only 23 years of age – he was a quiet, companionable, young fellow, much loved by all his comrades, and much mourned in his death.

A younger brother is serving in France. With the family sincere sympathy is felt, and in his home district, stricken by the devastations of war which has visited the hearts of so many people, Mr and Mrs Barron have the consolation of neighbours who know sorrow. In private life. Before the war, Lce-Cpl. Barron (whose photograph is reproduced today) was a gardener with Colonel Mackenzie of Ord, himself a soldier.

See entry above for details of his brother Duncan Barron

Photo: #6394

Cameron Ian, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Ian Cameron

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Ian
Rank: Private
Regiment: Unkown
Home Address: Ord Arms, Muir of Ord

Cameron, Private Ian, 1885, 25 years of age, was the youngest son of Mrs Cameron, Ord Arms, Muir of Ord. He served four years with the battalion, rejoining at outbreak of war, and was in France throughout. For eight years he was with Messrs Macdonald & Graham, Inverness. He acted as local secretary of Rural Workers’ League at Muir of Ord, and was a young man of great promise.

Photo: #6404

Cameron Peter R, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private Peter Robertson Cameron

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Peter Robertson
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Camerons
Home Address: Hilton, Muir of Ord

The parents of Pte. Peter Robertson Cameron, 1st Camerons, Hilton, Muir of Ord, of whom above is a photo, have received a letter from the War Office telling them the War Council has now come to conclude that the death of their son, Peter, took place on 14th September, 1914. He was posted missing on that date, but hopes were that he might be taken a prisoner of war. After 14 months of weary and sore suspense the sad news they have at length received is that he had been killed in action. Private Peter Cameron was one of the small Expeditionary Force which went out first from England in August to face the strong foe, and he took part at Mons, at the Marne, and in the chase of the Germans to the Aisne, where he gave up his life along with many others for his King and Country, and the noble cause of truth and righteousness. Before he enlisted in the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders he was booking clerk first at Wick station and then at Dalwhinnie. He was scarcely 18 years of age when he joined and he was nearly 20 but one [obliterated] when he was killed. He was a bright [remainder missing].

Previous to joining he was a policeman in Glasgow.

See entry below for details of his brother William Cameron

Photo: #6405

Cameron William, Pte, Muir Of Ord

Private WilliamCameron

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: 9th Seaforths
Home Address: Hilton, Muir of Ord

Headline

The parents of Pte. Peter Robertson Cameron, 1st Camerons, Hilton, Muir of Ord, of whom above is a photo, have received a letter from the War Office telling them the War Council has now come to conclude that the death of their son, Peter, took place on 14th September, 1914. He was posted missing on that date, but hopes were that he might be taken a prisoner of war. After 14 months of weary and sore suspense the sad news they have at length received is that he had been killed in action. Private Peter Cameron was one of the small Expeditionary Force which went out first from England in August to face the strong foe, and he took part at Mons, at the Marne, and in the chase of the Germans to the Aisne, where he gave up his life along with many others for his King and Country, and the noble cause of truth and righteousness. Before he enlisted in the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders he was booking clerk first at Wick station and then at Dalwhinnie. He was scarcely 18 years of age when he joined and he was nearly 20 but one [obliterated] when he was killed. He was a bright [remainder missing].

Previous to joining he was a policeman in Glasgow.

The above is a photo of another son of Mr and Mrs Cameron, Private Wm.Cameron,who is with the 9th Seaforths in France.

See entry above for details of his brother Peter Robertson Cameron

No photo available

Private D. Chisholm

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Chisholm
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Moy Bridge, Marybank, Muir of Ord

Missing since 20th September. He was last seen in the advance on that date. Before joining up Pte. Chisholm was in the employment of Messrs Robertson & Porter, motor engineers, Dingwall, and previous to that he was a gamekeeper at Scatwell, near Contin. His parents reside at Moy Bridge, Marybank, Muir of Ord, and they would welcome any information regarding him from any of his comrades who were in action with him on that date.

Pte. Chisholm was a great favourite with all who knew him, in and around Contin district. He was of a bright kindly disposition, upright, and lovable, and it is hoped that his parents and sisters may receive some news of his whereabouts through the medium of this paper. A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6378

Chisholm Donald, L Corp, Muir Of Ord

Lance Corporal Donald Chisholm

Date of Paper: 31.05.1918
Surname: Chisholm
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Dugary, Muir of Ord.

Mr and Mrs Colin Chisholm, Dugary, Muir of Ord, as already reported, have received official intimation that their son, No.40870 L./Cpl. Donald Chisholm, Camerons, was wounded in action on 25th April in the right arm and thigh. He is now in hospital in Leeds. L./Corpl. Chisholm, who originally was in the Lovat Scouts, had been in France for about two years, and has been through all the engagements with his regiment on the Western Front. In civil life he was a joiner to trade, and was well-known all over Ross-shire. His many friends will be pleased to hear that he is making satisfactory progress.

A photograph of L./Cpl. Chisholm appears to-day.

[Handwritten note: “Sept. 6/1918 M. M. – Private in Gazette”]

Photo: #7133

Chisholm Ronald, Private

Private Ronald Chisholm

Date of Paper: 29.03.1918
Surname: Chisholm
First Name(s): Ronald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 5th Camerons.
Home Address: Bishopmill, Sussex (formerly Muir of Ord)

Mr and Mrs Chisholm, Bishopmill, Sussex, England, and formerly of Wester Balloan, Muir of Ord, Ross-shire, have been officially informed that their son, Pte Ronald Chisholm, 5th Camerons, who was reported missing on May 3rd, 1917, was killed on or about that date. Pte. Chisholm joined the Lovat Scouts in the Autumn of 1915, and subsequently transferred to the Camerons, and went to France, where he shared in some fierce fighting.
The family are well-known in Muir of Ord, where the father was grieve at Wester Balloan before going to England. Pte. Chisholm was also employed on the farm. He was held in high esteem by all who knew him at home and in the regiment, and deep sympathy will be felt with the parents in their prolonged anxiety and uncertainty and in the death which is now presumed. A photograph appears to-day.*

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