Kilmuir and Logie Easter WW I page 2

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Photo: #5967

Innes Alexander, Pte, Delny

Private Alexander Innes

Date of Paper: 27.09.1917(?)
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Portleich, Delny

FIVE DELNY SOLDIER BROTHERS

Today there is printed photos of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Alexander Innes, Portleich, Delny, Ross-shire, one of whom, as recently reported, has made the supreme sacrifice. The record of Mr Innes’ family is exceptional, but not unique; and Easter Ross has one or two comparable cases of proud patriotism made manifest.

The eldest son, Pte. Alexander Innes, Canadians, joined the Army some time ago, and came over to England, doing his training at Sussex. By now he will be in France. It is seven years ago since he emigrated to Vancouver, where he was engaged in farming.

Corpl. Arthur Innes, Seaforths, was killed in action on 20th July last. Over three years ago he joined up, and went out to France in February 1916. He saw much service, and was wounded in action in the summer of 1917. Before entering the Army Cpl. Innes was employed with Mr Morrison in the Royal Hotel, Invergordon. A fine soldier, popular in the battalion, brave and courageous, he was a splendid type of manly Highlander. In his death he is greatly regretted regimentally and otherwise, and the parents and family have the sympathy of a wide community itself well-tried by sorrow.

Pte. Donald Innes, Seaforths, mobilised in the far back days of August, 1914, with the Ross-shire Territorials. He wears that proud distinction, the Medaille Militaire, the V.C. of the French Army, which can only be worn by the poilu and Generals. That decoration he won at Arras in April, 1917, when he was severely wounded and lost a leg. He is in hospital in Newbury, England. Pte. Innes served with the 2/4th Seaforths before going to France in 1916. In France he joined a Seaforth Service battalion.

Pte. Hector Innes, Argyll and Sutherlands, is on duty in Kent. Before enlisting he was employed with Mr Logan, Heathfield, Delny, for four years.

Pte. Jackie Innes, Camerons, was wounded recently on the Western Front, and is in hospital in France. He was a blacksmith at Broomfield, Delny, with Mr Ross.

See entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5962

Innes Arthur, Corp, Delny

Corporal Arthur Innes

Date of Paper: 27.09.1917(?)
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Arthur
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Portleich, Delny

FIVE DELNY SOLDIER BROTHERS

Today there is printed photos of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Alexander Innes, Portleich, Delny, Ross-shire, one of whom, as recently reported, has made the supreme sacrifice. The record of Mr Innes’ family is exceptional, but not unique; and Easter Ross has one or two comparable cases of proud patriotism made manifest.

The eldest son, Pte. Alexander Innes, Canadians, joined the Army some time ago, and came over to England, doing his training at Sussex. By now he will be in France. It is seven years ago since he emigrated to Vancouver, where he was engaged in farming.

Corpl. Arthur Innes, Seaforths, was killed in action on 20th July last. Over three years ago he joined up, and went out to France in February 1916. He saw much service, and was wounded in action in the summer of 1917. Before entering the Army Cpl. Innes was employed with Mr Morrison in the Royal Hotel, Invergordon. A fine soldier, popular in the battalion, brave and courageous, he was a splendid type of manly Highlander. In his death he is greatly regretted regimentally and otherwise, and the parents and family have the sympathy of a wide community itself well-tried by sorrow.

Pte. Donald Innes, Seaforths, mobilised in the far back days of August, 1914, with the Ross-shire Territorials. He wears that proud distinction, the Medaille Militaire, the V.C. of the French Army, which can only be worn by the poilu and Generals. That decoration he won at Arras in April, 1917, when he was severely wounded and lost a leg. He is in hospital in Newbury, England. Pte. Innes served with the 2/4th Seaforths before going to France in 1916. In France he joined a Seaforth Service battalion.

Pte. Hector Innes, Argyll and Sutherlands, is on duty in Kent. Before enlisting he was employed with Mr Logan, Heathfield, Delny, for four years.

Pte. Jackie Innes, Camerons, was wounded recently on the Western Front, and is in hospital in France. He was a blacksmith at Broomfield, Delny, with Mr Ross.

See entry below and entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5968

Innes Donald, Pte, Delny

Private Donald Innes

Date of Paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Portleich, Delny

MEDAILLE MILITAIRE FOR DELNY SEAFORTH

Pte. D. Innes, Seaforths, has won the much coveted French Medaille Militaire for conspicuous bravery on the field. Pte. Innes was called up with the 2/4th Seaforths until landing in France in 1916. He transferred to a Service Seaforth battalion. He was wounded at the battle of Arras, his officer and he being hit with the same shell. At present Pte. Innes is in a hospital in England. He was wounded on the left shoulder. Another brother is serving with the Ross-shire Seaforths at the front. Both are sons of Mr Innes, Portleich, Delny.

Date of Paper: 27.09.1917(?)

FIVE DELNY SOLDIER BROTHERS

Today there is printed photos of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Alexander Innes, Portleich, Delny, Ross-shire, one of whom, as recently reported, has made the supreme sacrifice. The record of Mr Innes’ family is exceptional, but not unique; and Easter Ross has one or two comparable cases of proud patriotism made manifest.

The eldest son, Pte. Alexander Innes, Canadians, joined the Army some time ago, and came over to England, doing his training at Sussex. By now he will be in France. It is seven years ago since he emigrated to Vancouver, where he was engaged in farming.

Corpl. Arthur Innes, Seaforths, was killed in action on 20th July last. Over three years ago he joined up, and went out to France in February 1916. He saw much service, and was wounded in action in the summer of 1917. Before entering the Army Cpl. Innes was employed with Mr Morrison in the Royal Hotel, Invergordon. A fine soldier, popular in the battalion, brave and courageous, he was a splendid type of manly Highlander. In his death he is greatly regretted regimentally and otherwise, and the parents and family have the sympathy of a wide community itself well-tried by sorrow.

Pte. Donald Innes, Seaforths, mobilised in the far back days of August, 1914, with the Ross-shire Territorials. He wears that proud distinction, the Medaille Militaire, the V.C. of the French Army, which can only be worn by the poilu and Generals. That decoration he won at Arras in April, 1917, when he was severely wounded and lost a leg. He is in hospital in Newbury, England. Pte. Innes served with the 2/4th Seaforths before going to France in 1916. In France he joined a Seaforth Service battalion.

Pte. Hector Innes, Argyll and Sutherlands, is on duty in Kent. Before enlisting he was employed with Mr Logan, Heathfield, Delny, for four years.

Pte. Jackie Innes, Camerons, was wounded recently on the Western Front, and is in hospital in France. He was a blacksmith at Broomfield, Delny, with Mr Ross.

See entries below and entries above for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5973

Innes Hector, Pte, Delny

Private Hector Innes

Date of Paper: 27.09.1917(?)
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Hector
Rank: Private
Regiment: Argyll and Sutherlands
Home Address: Portleich, Delny

FIVE DELNY SOLDIER BROTHERS

Today there is printed photos of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Alexander Innes, Portleich, Delny, Ross-shire, one of whom, as recently reported, has made the supreme sacrifice. The record of Mr Innes’ family is exceptional, but not unique; and Easter Ross has one or two comparable cases of proud patriotism made manifest.

The eldest son, Pte. Alexander Innes, Canadians, joined the Army some time ago, and came over to England, doing his training at Sussex. By now he will be in France. It is seven years ago since he emigrated to Vancouver, where he was engaged in farming.

Corpl. Arthur Innes, Seaforths, was killed in action on 20th July last. Over three years ago he joined up, and went out to France in February 1916. He saw much service, and was wounded in action in the summer of 1917. Before entering the Army Cpl. Innes was employed with Mr Morrison in the Royal Hotel, Invergordon. A fine soldier, popular in the battalion, brave and courageous, he was a splendid type of manly Highlander. In his death he is greatly regretted regimentally and otherwise, and the parents and family have the sympathy of a wide community itself well-tried by sorrow.

Pte. Donald Innes, Seaforths, mobilised in the far back days of August, 1914, with the Ross-shire Territorials. He wears that proud distinction, the Medaille Militaire, the V.C. of the French Army, which can only be worn by the poilu and Generals. That decoration he won at Arras in April, 1917, when he was severely wounded and lost a leg. He is in hospital in Newbury, England. Pte. Innes served with the 2/4th Seaforths before going to France in 1916. In France he joined a Seaforth Service battalion.

Pte. Hector Innes, Argyll and Sutherlands, is on duty in Kent. Before enlisting he was employed with Mr Logan, Heathfield, Delny, for four years.

Pte. Jackie Innes, Camerons, was wounded recently on the Western Front, and is in hospital in France. He was a blacksmith at Broomfield, Delny, with Mr Ross.

See entry below and entries above for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5975

Innes Jack, Pte, Delny

Date of Paper: 27.09.1917.(?)
Surname: Innes
First Name(s): Jack
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Portleich, Delny

FIVE DELNY SOLDIER BROTHERS

Today there is printed photos of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Alexander Innes, Portleich, Delny, Ross-shire, one of whom, as recently reported, has made the supreme sacrifice. The record of Mr Innes’ family is exceptional, but not unique; and Easter Ross has one or two comparable cases of proud patriotism made manifest.

The eldest son, Pte. Alexander Innes, Canadians, joined the Army some time ago, and came over to England, doing his training at Sussex. By now he will be in France. It is seven years ago since he emigrated to Vancouver, where he was engaged in farming.

Corpl. Arthur Innes, Seaforths, was killed in action on 20th July last. Over three years ago he joined up, and went out to France in February 1916. He saw much service, and was wounded in action in the summer of 1917. Before entering the Army Cpl. Innes was employed with Mr Morrison in the Royal Hotel, Invergordon. A fine soldier, popular in the battalion, brave and courageous, he was a splendid type of manly Highlander. In his death he is greatly regretted regimentally and otherwise, and the parents and family have the sympathy of a wide community itself well-tried by sorrow.

Pte. Donald Innes, Seaforths, mobilised in the far back days of August, 1914, with the Ross-shire Territorials. He wears that proud distinction, the Medaille Militaire, the V.C. of the French Army, which can only be worn by the poilu and Generals. That decoration he won at Arras in April, 1917, when he was severely wounded and lost a leg. He is in hospital in Newbury, England. Pte. Innes served with the 2/4th Seaforths before going to France in 1916. In France he joined a Seaforth Service battalion.

Pte. Hector Innes, Argyll and Sutherlands, is on duty in Kent. Before enlisting he was employed with Mr Logan, Heathfield, Delny, for four years.

Pte. Jackie Innes, Camerons, was wounded recently on the Western Front, and is in hospital in France. He was a blacksmith at Broomfield, Delny, with Mr Ross.

See entries above for details of his four brothers

Photo: #7155

Mackay H C, Pte

Private Hubert C. Mackay

Date of Paper: 17.02.1915
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Hubert
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Lamington, Logie Easter

THE LATE PTE. HUBERT C. MACKAY

The above is a portrait of the late 1718 Private Hubert C. Mackay, A (Tain) Coy. Lamington, Logie Easter, who was killed on the 3rd November, 1915 by the bursting of a bomb. He was barely 19 years of age, and went out with his regiment in November, 1914. He was invalided home when recovering from an attack of measles, and only returned to the front in June last. His commanding officer Lieut-Colonel Cuthbert, wrote to his parents in most sympathetic terms, and stated that Huber was a great favourite with his comrades; a lad who knew his duty and did it fearlessly.
He is buried in Merville Cemetery, where so many of his comrades have already found a resting place.

Photo: #6308

Mackenzie Donald H, L Corp, Kilmuir

Lance Corporal Donald Hector Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 04.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald Hector
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Parkhill Cottage, Rhives, Kilmuir

THE LATE L.-CPL. D. H. MACKENZIE, RHIVES

Mr and Mrs Robert Mackenzie, Parkhill Cottage, Rhives, have been informed that their youngest son, Lce.-Cpl. Donald Hector Mackenzie, Seaforths, was killed in action on 9th April. He was anxious to join the Forces before attaining military age, but met with no encouragement. However, a year ago he realised his desire, and joined the county regiment. Three months later he was promoted lance-corporal. The best shot in his company, he received the cross guns and several prizes. “Dan”, as he was familiarly known, was a promising young man, exemplary in church attendance and a great favourite in the parish of Kilmuir. Lieut. Chapman, in writing to his parents, referred to him as ” a splendid fellow, popular among his comrades, and one of the best soldiers in his platoon”. The eldest son of the family, George, was in Canada at the outbreak of war, and came to this country with the first Canadian contingent. He was wounded early in 1915, and has since been engaged on home service. The sympathy of the district goes out to the sorrowing parents and family. A portrait of Lance-Corporal Mackenzie appears today.

Photo: #5733

Mackenzie Duncan, L Corp, Inverness ex Alness

Lance Corporal Duncan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.03.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths
Home Address: 35, Charles Street, Inverness

TWO GALLANT 4th SEAFORTHS

Mrs Duncan Mackenzie (late of Holm Mills), 35 Charles Street, Inverness, has just received the Military Medal awarded to her son, Sgt. Evan Mackenzie, 4th Seaforth Highlanders, who was killed on April 11th, 1918. He went to France early in 1916 and took part in all the severe fighting, he being one of the famous 51st Division. The deceased won his honour in September 1917, and not being decorated with it before his death, his mother was asked just now to attend a military parade and have her son’s medal presented. She preferred not to attend the parade, and accordingly the medal was sent privately to her. Sergt. Mackenzie was well-known in Ross-shire, where he worked on the Pollo Estate, Delny.

A second son, L./Cpl. Duncan Mackenzie, M.M., 266569, 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths, had been awarded the same honour, and was decorated by the Duke of Connaught in 1917. He was severely wounded but recovered, and returned to France for his second time in March 1918, when, on July 20th of the same year, he was reported as “missing”. Information of any kind regarding him will be gladly received by his mother. L./Cpl. Mackenzie, before joining up, worked in the accountant’s office, Highland Railway, Inverness.

Both sons were splendid types of the true Highland soldier, and much sympathy is extended to Mrs Mackenzie in her great loss and suspense.

See entry below for details of his brother Evan Mackenzie

Photo: #7150

Mackenzie Evan, Sergt

Sergeant Evan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.03.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Evan
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 4th Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: 35, Charles Street, Inverness

TWO GALLANT 4th SEAFORTHS

Mrs Duncan Mackenzie (late of Holm Mills), 35 Charles Street, Inverness, has just received the Military Medal awarded to her son, Sgt. Evan Mackenzie, 4th Seaforth Highlanders, who was killed on April 11th, 1918. He went to France early in 1916 and took part in all the severe fighting, he being one of the famous 51st Division. The deceased won his honour in September 1917, and not being decorated with it before his death, his mother was asked just now to attend a military parade and have her son’s medal presented. She preferred not to attend the parade, and accordingly the medal was sent privately to her. Sergt. Mackenzie was well-known in Ross-shire, where he worked on the Pollo Estate, Delny.

A second son, L./Cpl. Duncan Mackenzie, M.M., 266569, 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths, had been awarded the same honour, and was decorated by the Duke of Connaught in 1917. He was severely wounded but recovered, and returned to France for his second time in March 1918, when, on July 20th of the same year, he was reported as “missing”. Information of any kind regarding him will be gladly received by his mother. L./Cpl. Mackenzie, before joining up, worked in the accountant’s office, Highland Railway, Inverness.

Both sons were splendid types of the true Highland soldier, and much sympathy is extended to Mrs Mackenzie in her great loss and suspense.

See entry above for details of his brother Duncan Mackenzie

Photo: #5969

Macleod Donald, Pte, Delny

Private Donald Macleod

Date of Paper: 03.08.1917
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Delny

No Headline

Private Donald Macleod, Seaforths, who was killed in action on August 22nd, and whose photograph we reproduce above, was the elder son of Mr and Mrs William Macleod, Balintraid Farm, Delny. He was killed while advancing with his company, being hit by a shell. He fell without a word, death being instantaneous.

Private Macleod was called to the colours in January last, going out to France in July. His only brother, Pte. William Macleod, was in a territorial battalion, and was called up in August 1914. He is still in France. He was wounded in April, came home on leave, and rejoined his battalion in France last June.

The chaplain of the battalion writes to Mrs Macleod – “I can assure you his loss we deeply deplore. He showed himself brave and fearless – a good soldier. He was highly esteemed by his commander.”
Pte. D. Macleod was much liked and respected by all who knew him. He was a generous and hard-working man, and will be sincerely missed by all his relations and his friends in his old home. He was 24 years of age, and ever since he left school he worked for Major Forsyth, being a ploughman at Balintraid for many years.

See entry below for details of his brother William Macleod

Photo: #5978

Macleod William, Pte, Delny

Private William Macleod

Date of Paper: 03.08.1917
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Delny

No Headline

Private Donald Macleod, Seaforths, who was killed in action on August 22nd, and whose photograph we reproduce above, was the elder son of Mr and Mrs William Macleod, Balintraid Farm, Delny. He was killed while advancing with his company, being hit by a shell. He fell without a word, death being instantaneous.

Private Macleod was called to the colours in January last, going out to France in July. His only brother, Pte. William Macleod, was in a territorial battalion, and was called up in August 1914. He is still in France. He was wounded in April, came home on leave, and rejoined his battalion in France last June.

The chaplain of the battalion writes to Mrs Macleod – “I can assure you his loss we deeply deplore. He showed himself brave and fearless – a good soldier. He was highly esteemed by his commander.”
Pte. D. Macleod was much liked and respected by all who knew him. He was a generous and hard-working man, and will be sincerely missed by all his relations and his friends in his old home. He was 24 years of age, and ever since he left school he worked for Major Forsyth, being a ploughman at Balintraid for many years.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Macleod

Photo: #6284

Macleod Donald, Gunner, Kildary

Gunner Donald Macleod

Date of Paper: 11.4.1919
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: R.F.A.
Home Address: Balnagown Farm, Kildary

TWO KILDARY HEROES

Reproduced above are the photographs of two well-known Kildary boys, sons of Mr James Macleod, Balnagown Farm, Kildary.

Private John Macleod, 2nd Seaforths, paid the supreme sacrifice on 4th October, 1917, and lies at rest in Leipsic Farm Cemetery, two miles north-west of Ypres. Just 20 years of age the month before his death, he enlisted on 5th March, 1917, and after training at Cromarty he went to France on 21st June of the same year, and was attached to the 2nd Seaforths. Prior to enlisting he was a clerk to the Surveyor of Taxes at Elgin.

Gunner Donald Macleod, RFA, who is 25 years of age, was a clerk with Messrs Robert Murray & Sons, grain merchants, Glasgow, when he enlisted in the QOR, Glasgow Yeomanry, on 17th May, 1915. In 1917 he was transferred to the Dragoons, and subsequently in 1918 to the RFA. On 6th August, 1918, he was injured, and invalided home in October. On 18th February this year he was demobilised.

See entry below for details of his brother John Macleod

Photo: #6291

Macleod John, Pte, Kildary

Private John Macleod

Date of Paper: 11.04.1919
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Seaforths
Home Address: Balnagown Farm, Kildary

TWO KILDARY HEROES

Reproduced above are the photographs of two well-known Kildary boys, sons of Mr James Macleod, Balnagown Farm, Kildary.

Private John Macleod, 2nd Seaforths, paid the supreme sacrifice on 4th October, 1917, and lies at rest in Leipsic Farm Cemetery, two miles north-west of Ypres. Just 20 years of age the month before his death, he enlisted on 5th March, 1917, and after training at Cromarty he went to France on 21st June of the same year, and was attached to the 2nd Seaforths. Prior to enlisting he was a clerk to the Surveyor of Taxes at Elgin.

Gunner Donald Macleod, RFA, who is 25 years of age, was a clerk with Messrs Robert Murray & Sons, grain merchants, Glasgow, when he enlisted in the QOR, Glasgow Yeomanry, on 17th May, 1915. In 1917 he was transferred to the Dragoons, and subsequently in 1918 to the RFA. On 6th August, 1918, he was injured, and invalided home in October. On 18th February this year he was demobilised.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Macleod

Photo: #5976

Macleod James F, Pte, Delny

Private James Fraser Macleod

Date of Paper: 20.10.1916
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): James Fraser
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Delny

DELNY CAMERON KILLED

5045 Private James Fraser Macleod, Camerons, whose portrait is reproduced today, has been killed in action. A nephew of Donald Fraser, Balintraid Pier, Delny, he went to France in November 1914, and was wounded in the leg by shrapnel on the 9th of May, 1915. In hospital in England for some time, he afterwards rejoined his unit at Invergordon. Time-expired in January 1915, he re-enlisted, and in May of this year was sent to the front to join the Camerons. He was killed by shell fire on 19th July. His body was carried from the trench by his comrades and buried in the British Cemetery at Vermelles. Before called up from the Reserve he was employed on the farm of Balintraid. His death is deeply regretted. To an amiable and kindly disposition he added the native grit of the soldier and Highlander. Three other nephews of Mr Fraser are serving with the colours.

Photo: #5965

McGinn, L Corp, Delny

Lance Corporal McGinn

Date of Paper: 07.06.1918
Surname: McGinn
First Name(s): Not stated
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Kindeace Mains, Delny

DELNY CAMERON MISSING

As reported recently, Mrs McGinn, Kindeace Mains, Delny, received information that her husband, 20435 L./Corpl. McGinn, Camerons, is missing and believed to be a prisoner of war. Any information will be gratefully received.

L./Cpl. McGinn has seen a great deal of service. He shared the hardships and the rigorous campaigning at Gallipoli, where he was wounded. Returning to England, on recovering, he was once more put under orders for active service, and proceeded to France in 1916. There he saw much of the heavy fighting in which the Camerons have borne their full share, escaping often marvellously without a scratch until March, when he was posted missing as stated. From letters received Mrs McGinn has good hopes that her husband may be a prisoner of war, but, as mentioned, any further information will be gratefully received.
A photo appears today.

[Handwritten note: “P. of War 21.6.18”]

Photo: #6285

Michael R, L Corp, Kildary

Lance Corporal R. Michael

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Michael
First Name(s): R.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Milntown, Kildary

THE LATE LCE.-CORPL. R. MICHAEL, KILDARY

As already repoted, Mrs Michael, Milntown, Kildary, received word that her only son, Lce-Corpl. R. Michael, Machine Gun Corps, late Seaforths, has died at the Casualty Clearing Station, France, from a gunshot wound in the head. He had been in France since November, 1914, and had been through several severe engagments during that time. He was 27 years of age, and, prior to joning the colours, was employed by Messrs Macdonald Ltd., timber merchants, Inverness.

Lce-Corpl. Michael was of a bright and cheery disposition and his many frineds extend their sincere sympathy to his parents and sisters in their bereavement.

Photo: #6282

Morrison Donald, Corp, Kildary

Corporal Donald Morrison

Date of Paper: 08.06.1917
Surname: Morrison
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Meddat, Kildary

THE LATE CORPORAL D. MORRISON, SEAFORTHS, KILDARY

Mr and Mrs Morrison, Meddat, Kildary, have received intimation that their son, Corpl. Donald Morrison, Seaforths was killed in action in France on the 23rd April by shell fire. His platoon officer, writing to his mother, says: “He was killed along with two of his comrades, but had no suffering, as death was instantaneous. He was a most excellent soldier; very popular, and will be missed by all, and I offer you my most sincere sympathy.” A young man, 28 years of age, of handsome appearance and powerful physique, before joining his county regiment he was in the Ross-shire constabulary, and he was stationed at Invergordon, Cromarty, and Evanton, where he was deservedly popular among all classes. Much sympathy goes out to his sorrowing parents, and brothers and sisters. A photograph appears to-day.

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