Kilmuir and Logie Easter WW I page 1

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Photo: #5982

Bethune Farquhar, Trooper, Delny

Trooper Farquhar Bethune

Date of Paper: 23.02.1917
Surname: Bethune
First Name(s): Farquhar
Rank: Trooper
Regiment: 107th Company, Imperial Yeomanry
Home Address: Broomhill, Delny

No Headline

The above are photographs of the brothers Bethune, sons of the late Mr Roderick Bethune, Broomill, Delny. The second son went through the Boer War with the Imperial Yeomanry, but has since died: other two have given their lives in the present European War, while another is still on service in France. It is men such as these that have made the Highlander famous in history. The survivors at home now are two sisters – Mrs James Fraser, Loanridge, Boath; and the youngest of the family, Miss Annie Bethune who resides in Glasgow. The particulars of the four boys make sad but interesting reading:

Trooper Farquhar Bethune, 107th Company, Imperial Yeomanry, enlisted when volunteers were called for in the South African campaign. He went through several of the more important engagements, and for his services he received the South African medal and three clasps. After returning home he migrated to America, and some years ago he died in hospital at St Louis. He was a big handsome type of Highlander, and quite fearless. He was 35.

Private Grigor Bethune, 26 years of age, was in Australia, where he went some years ago. When the war broke out he immediately volunteered, and formed one of the 1st Australian Contingent, which arrived in Egypt early in 1915. He subsequently took part in the Gallipoli campaign, including the landing at Suvla Bay. On the second day of landing he was slightly wounded, but recovered quickly. He remained at Gallipoli till the evacuation. He is now in France, and forms one of five men, the only representatives left of the original company which sailed from Melbourne.

Private Roderick Bethune, 24 years of age, was educated at Invergordon Academy. He always had a love for the sea, and he started as a seaman on a merchant vessel. By hard work and study he mastered his duties so rapidly and was so successful in his examinations that he very soon rose to the position of second mate on a well-known liner. When on a visit to New Zealand he transferred to another merchant ship, and he was in New Zealand when the war broke out in1914. Like his brother Grigor, he instantly offered his services, and he took his place in the 1st New Zealand Contingent, and also took part in the landing at Suvla Bay, but he was less fortunate than Grigor, and he fell on the 6th June, 1915 – a very promising career, nobly ended for King and country.

Private Findlay Bethune, in his 37th year, was in New Zealand, to where he had gone thirteen years ago, when he heard of his younger brotherís death. An engine driver to trade, he was working up country at a sawmill. He immediately threw up his job, and joined the New Zealand Forces. Anxious to get at the enemy he transferred to theAustralian Force, and came to England with a draft. He reached France last summer, and took part in the great advance in July. On 18th November, 1916, however, he was killed by a hand bomb, and he lies at rest on the shores of a foreign country.

See entries below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #5971

Bethune Finlay, Pte, Delny

Private Findlay Bethune

Date of Paper: 23.02.1917
Surname: Bethune
First Name(s): Finlay
Rank: Private
Regiment: Australian Force
Home Address: Broomhill, Delny

No Headline

The above are photographs of the brothers Bethune, sons of the late Mr Roderick Bethune, Broomill, Delny. The second son went through the Boer War with the Imperial Yeomanry, but has since died: other two have given their lives in the present European War, while another is still on service in France. It is men such as these that have made the Highlander famous in history. The survivors at home now are two sisters – Mrs James Fraser, Loanridge, Boath; and the youngest of the family, Miss Annie Bethune who resides in Glasgow. The particulars of the four boys make sad but interesting reading:

Trooper Farquhar Bethune, 107th Company, Imperial Yeomanry, enlisted when volunteers were called for in the South African campaign. He went through several of the more important engagements, and for his services he received the South African medal and three clasps. After returning home he migrated to America, and some years ago he died in hospital at St Louis. He was a big handsome type of Highlander, and quite fearless. He was 35.

Private Grigor Bethune, 26 years of age, was in Australia, where he went some years ago. When the war broke out he immediately volunteered, and formed one of the 1st Australian Contingent, which arrived in Egypt early in 1915. He subsequently took part in the Gallipoli campaign, including the landing at Suvla Bay. On the second day of landing he was slightly wounded, but recovered quickly. He remained at Gallipoli till the evacuation. He is now in France, and forms one of five men, the only representatives left of the original company which sailed from Melbourne.

Private Roderick Bethune, 24 years of age, was educated at Invergordon Academy. He always had a love for the sea, and he started as a seaman on a merchant vessel. By hard work and study he mastered his duties so rapidly and was so successful in his examinations that he very soon rose to the position of second mate on a well-known liner. When on a visit to New Zealand he transferred to another merchant ship, and he was in New Zealand when the war broke out in1914. Like his brother Grigor, he instantly offered his services, and he took his place in the 1st New Zealand Contingent, and also took part in the landing at Suvla Bay, but he was less fortunate than Grigor, and he fell on the 6th June, 1915 – a very promising career, nobly ended for King and country.

Private Findlay Bethune, in his 37th year, was in New Zealand, to where he had gone thirteen years ago, when he heard of his younger brotherís death. An engine driver to trade, he was working up country at a sawmill. He immediately threw up his job, and joined the New Zealand Forces. Anxious to get at the enemy he transferred to theAustralian Force, and came to England with a draft. He reached France last summer, and took part in the great advance in July. On 18th November, 1916, however, he was killed by a hand bomb, and he lies at rest on the shores of a foreign country.

See entries below and one entry above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #5972

Bethune Grigor, Pte, Delny

Private Grigor Bethune

Date of Paper: 23.02.1917
Surname: Bethune
First Name(s): Grigor
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Australian Contingent
Home Address: Broomhill, Delny

No Headline

The above are photographs of the brothers Bethune, sons of the late Mr Roderick Bethune, Broomill, Delny. The second son went through the Boer War with the Imperial Yeomanry, but has since died: other two have given their lives in the present European War, while another is still on service in France. It is men such as these that have made the Highlander famous in history. The survivors at home now are two sisters – Mrs James Fraser, Loanridge, Boath; and the youngest of the family, Miss Annie Bethune who resides in Glasgow. The particulars of the four boys make sad but interesting reading:

Trooper Farquhar Bethune, 107th Company, Imperial Yeomanry, enlisted when volunteers were called for in the South African campaign. He went through several of the more important engagements, and for his services he received the South African medal and three clasps. After returning home he migrated to America, and some years ago he died in hospital at St Louis. He was a big handsome type of Highlander, and quite fearless. He was 35.

Private Grigor Bethune, 26 years of age, was in Australia, where he went some years ago. When the war broke out he immediately volunteered, and formed one of the 1st Australian Contingent, which arrived in Egypt early in 1915. He subsequently took part in the Gallipoli campaign, including the landing at Suvla Bay. On the second day of landing he was slightly wounded, but recovered quickly. He remained at Gallipoli till the evacuation. He is now in France, and forms one of five men, the only representatives left of the original company which sailed from Melbourne.

Private Roderick Bethune, 24 years of age, was educated at Invergordon Academy. He always had a love for the sea, and he started as a seaman on a merchant vessel. By hard work and study he mastered his duties so rapidly and was so successful in his examinations that he very soon rose to the position of second mate on a well-known liner. When on a visit to New Zealand he transferred to another merchant ship, and he was in New Zealand when the war broke out in1914. Like his brother Grigor, he instantly offered his services, and he took his place in the 1st New Zealand Contingent, and also took part in the landing at Suvla Bay, but he was less fortunate than Grigor, and he fell on the 6th June, 1915 – a very promising career, nobly ended for King and country.

Private Findlay Bethune, in his 37th year, was in New Zealand, to where he had gone thirteen years ago, when he heard of his younger brotherís death. An engine driver to trade, he was working up country at a sawmill. He immediately threw up his job, and joined the New Zealand Forces. Anxious to get at the enemy he transferred to theAustralian Force, and came to England with a draft. He reached France last summer, and took part in the great advance in July. On 18th November, 1916, however, he was killed by a hand bomb, and he lies at rest on the shores of a foreign country.

See entries above and one entry below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #5977

Bethune Roderick, Pte, Delny

Private Roderick Bethune

Date of Paper: 23.02.1917
Surname: Bethune
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st New Zealand Contingent
Home Address: Broomhill, Delny

No Headline

The above are photographs of the brothers Bethune, sons of the late Mr Roderick Bethune, Broomill, Delny. The second son went through the Boer War with the Imperial Yeomanry, but has since died: other two have given their lives in the present European War, while another is still on service in France. It is men such as these that have made the Highlander famous in history. The survivors at home now are two sisters – Mrs James Fraser, Loanridge, Boath; and the youngest of the family, Miss Annie Bethune who resides in Glasgow. The particulars of the four boys make sad but interesting reading:

Trooper Farquhar Bethune, 107th Company, Imperial Yeomanry, enlisted when volunteers were called for in the South African campaign. He went through several of the more important engagements, and for his services he received the South African medal and three clasps. After returning home he migrated to America, and some years ago he died in hospital at St Louis. He was a big handsome type of Highlander, and quite fearless. He was 35.

Private Grigor Bethune, 26 years of age, was in Australia, where he went some years ago. When the war broke out he immediately volunteered, and formed one of the 1st Australian Contingent, which arrived in Egypt early in 1915. He subsequently took part in the Gallipoli campaign, including the landing at Suvla Bay. On the second day of landing he was slightly wounded, but recovered quickly. He remained at Gallipoli till the evacuation. He is now in France, and forms one of five men, the only representatives left of the original company which sailed from Melbourne.

Private Roderick Bethune, 24 years of age, was educated at Invergordon Academy. He always had a love for the sea, and he started as a seaman on a merchant vessel. By hard work and study he mastered his duties so rapidly and was so successful in his examinations that he very soon rose to the position of second mate on a well-known liner. When on a visit to New Zealand he transferred to another merchant ship, and he was in New Zealand when the war broke out in1914. Like his brother Grigor, he instantly offered his services, and he took his place in the 1st New Zealand Contingent, and also took part in the landing at Suvla Bay, but he was less fortunate than Grigor, and he fell on the 6th June, 1915 – a very promising career, nobly ended for King and country.

Private Findlay Bethune, in his 37th year, was in New Zealand, to where he had gone thirteen years ago, when he heard of his younger brotherís death. An engine driver to trade, he was working up country at a sawmill. He immediately threw up his job, and joined the New Zealand Forces. Anxious to get at the enemy he transferred to theAustralian Force, and came to England with a draft. He reached France last summer, and took part in the great advance in July. On 18th November, 1916, however, he was killed by a hand bomb, and he lies at rest on the shores of a foreign country.

See entries above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #5961

Cameron Charles T, 2 Lieut, Delny

Second Lieutenant Charles T. Cameron

Date of Paper: 19.04.1918
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Charles T.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Kindeace, Delny

No Headline

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of 2/Lt. Charles T. Cameron, Seaforths, son of Mrs Cameron, Kindeace, Delny, who, as reported last week, was killed in action on 21st March, the first day of the great German offensive. A biographical notice of Lt. Cameron, who was on the staff of Messrs C. & J. Urquhart, Dingwall, has already been published. Subjoined are extracts from letters from officers of his unit. Lieut. Colonel Samuel Macdonald, D.S.O. (with two Bars), commanding the battalion (and who has since been wounded), says:

“My dear Mrs Cameron, – It is with a sad and heavy heart that I now convey to you the tragic news of your brave son, Lieut. Cameron’s death in action. He was killed on the 21st March during the recent great German offensive. I beg you to accept our sincere and deep sympathy in the death in action of such a noble son, and, to us, a most worthy and estimable comrade. Your son has seen much active service since 1914, and right nobly has he played his part throughout. In this battalion he had earned my highest approbation as a most able and estimable officer. We shall miss his stalwart figure, and shall no more hear that cheery voice which so richly blended those fine characteristics of his nature – optimism and straightforwardness. To you, his mother and to all his dear ones this must be a terrible blow. I have said so often that you mothers are the true heroines of this great world war, and in no case was it truer than in yours, for your son’s loss must have been a severe one to you.”

The Rev. A.T. Agnew, C.F. writes: “I knew your son well and liked him very much, and so can guess what your loss must be, but I also know that the noble way in which he gave up his life for his country must be in itself a consolation. Then there is that sure ground of confidence in our faith where we learn that Christ will raise up those that are His to life eternal.”

2/Lt. John Macdonald of the same unit writes: “Charlie and I were chums from the day he came to the Battalion and during all the actions we have been through together. I have met no finer or braver soldier. His brother officers loved him as a brother and his N.C.O.’s and men worshipped him for all his kind, brave and noble actions.

We mourn his loss as that of a brother.”

Photo: #5964

Corbett Colin, Gunner, Delny

Gunner Colin Corbett

Date of Paper: 19.01.1917
Surname: Corbett
First Name(s): Colin
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Gun Artillery
Home Address: Rhives Farm, Delny

THE LATE GUNNER COLIN CORBETT, DELNY

The above is a photograph of Gunner Colin Corbett. R.G.A., killed in action on the 10th December, 1916. The third son of Mr and Mrs Corbett, Rhives Farm, Delny, he was well known in Dingwall, where he was employed with Mr Macmillan, grocer, for five years as a storeman. He was very popular amongst his companions, being recognised as a quiet and intelligent young man. Deceased enlisted in October, 1915, and was for some time training at Invergordon. Subsequently he proceeded to England, and went to France early in June last. His parents were looking forward to his home-coming at Christmas when the sad news arrived about his death.

In a letter to Mrs Corbett, the officer commanding the battery writes: “Gunner Corbett, in my opinion, was an excellent soldier who did his duty at all times. I am certain he rests now with the many other brave young men who have died in defence of their King and Country, and is happier by far than those who remain to carry on the fight.”

Photo: #5981

Cruickshank A, Trooper, Delny

Trooper A. Cruickshank

Date of Paper: 24.11.1915
Surname: Cruickshank
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Trooper
Regiment: 1/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Priesthill, Delny.

No Headline

Trooper A. Cruickshank, 1/2nd Lovat Scouts, wounded on 3rd November, 1915, at Gallipoli, is a son of Mr Cruickshank, Priesthill, Delny. He is now in hospital in England, and making satisfactory progress.

Photo: #6296

Fraser J, Sgt, Kildary

Sergeant J. Fraser

Date of Paper: 19.07.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: White House, Tarbat, Kildary

A KILDARY FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

On Tuesday, 4th August, 1914, when in the evening the bugles wounded the assembly in Ross-shire, Mr J. Fraser, White House, Tarbat, Kildary, had three sons in the ranks of the 4th Seaforths. [Section obliterated] Right through Neuve Chapelle, Aubers and Loos in 1915, on through the 1916 campaign in the Somme and to Beaumont Hamel, he took part in many battles. He went unscathed through Arras battles in[another section obliterated] …..we had a service just as we do at home.
After the service was over the pipers played a lament. The cemetery is very well cared for, and the grave is plainly marked and will always be looked after. I cannot tell you how sorry we all are.
Your son was one of the best men we had, and he had been such a long time with us too. Everybody liked him. Others will probably speak of his great worth as a soldier and as a man.

He laid down his life for the sake of righteousness and freedom and no man can do more. I pray that God may help you all in this sad hour. Your boy is in His hands and we know a day will come when the grave will give up its dead. With deepest sympathy.”

In peace times Sergt. Fraser was well known as a Territorial. He was one of the crackshots of the battalion and the winner of many prizes. He held the Countess of Moray’s silver cup. With the bereaved family there is the deepest sympathy.

Mr Fraser’s other son, ex-Private Simon Fraser, also called up at mobilisation, was released for railway service and is meantime stationed at Invergordon.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6290

Fraser Hugh, Pte, Kildary

Private Hugh Fraser

Date of Paper: 19.07.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: White House, Tarbat, Kildary

A KILDARY FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

On Tuesday, 4th August, 1914, when in the evening the bugles wounded the assembly in Ross-shire, Mr J. Fraser, White House, Tarbat, Kildary, had three sons in the ranks of the 4th Seaforths. [Section obliterated] Right through Neuve Chapelle, Aubers and Loos in 1915, on through the 1916 campaign in the Somme and to Beaumont Hamel, he took part in many battles. He went unscathed through Arras battles in[another section obliterated] …..we had a service just as we do at home.
After the service was over the pipers played a lament. The cemetery is very well cared for, and the grave is plainly marked and will always be looked after. I cannot tell you how sorry we all are.
Your son was one of the best men we had, and he had been such a long time with us too. Everybody liked him. Others will probably speak of his great worth as a soldier and as a man.

He laid down his life for the sake of righteousness and freedom and no man can do more. I pray that God may help you all in this sad hour. Your boy is in His hands and we know a day will come when the grave will give up its dead. With deepest sympathy.”

In peace times Sergt. Fraser was well known as a Territorial. He was one of the crackshots of the battalion and the winner of many prizes. He held the Countess of Moray’s silver cup. With the bereaved family there is the deepest sympathy.

Mr Fraser’s other son, ex-Private Simon Fraser, also called up at mobilisation, was released for railway service and is meantime stationed at Invergordon.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6293

Fraser Simon, Pte, Kildary

Private Simon Fraser

Date of Paper: 19.07.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s) : Simon
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: White House, Tarbat, Kildary

A KILDARY FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

On Tuesday, 4th August, 1914, when in the evening the bugles wounded the assembly in Ross-shire, Mr J. Fraser, White House, Tarbat, Kildary, had three sons in the ranks of the 4th Seaforths. [Section obliterated] Right through Neuve Chapelle, Aubers and Loos in 1915, on through the 1916 campaign in the Somme and to Beaumont Hamel, he took part in many battles. He went unscathed through Arras battles in[another section obliterated] …..we had a service just as we do at home.
After the service was over the pipers played a lament. The cemetery is very well cared for, and the grave is plainly marked and will always be looked after. I cannot tell you how sorry we all are.
Your son was one of the best men we had, and he had been such a long time with us too. Everybody liked him. Others will probably speak of his great worth as a soldier and as a man.

He laid down his life for the sake of righteousness and freedom and no man can do more. I pray that God may help you all in this sad hour. Your boy is in His hands and we know a day will come when the grave will give up its dead. With deepest sympathy.”

In peace times Sergt. Fraser was well known as a Territorial. He was one of the crackshots of the battalion and the winner of many prizes. He held the Countess of Moray’s silver cup. With the bereaved family there is the deepest sympathy.

Mr Fraser’s other son, ex-Private Simon Fraser, also called up at mobilisation, was released for railway service and is meantime stationed at Invergordon.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Captain Alexander Garrow

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Garrow
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Mercantile marine
Home Address: Polnicol

No Headline

Four or five sons – one Brigadier with Cameron Reserves. He was severely wounded in August last and then home recently bore all the marks of having been in the thick of it. Captain Alexander Garrow is a mercantile marine, while a sixth son, a dentist by profession, is serving as a dentist with the Forces. Lt. Garrow remained with this unit. He has seen a good deal of service, was twice gassed and was home for a brief spell on recovering. Lieut. Garrow is a capital type of officer and his friends in the regiment write fondly of him.

Mr Garrow’s eldest son, Lieut-Colonel Robert Garrow is in Mesopotamia at the head of the River Conservancy. He is a distinguished man in the Engineering world and has held several important appointments abroad, coming home to take up special duties for the Government. The second son, Mr Duncan Garrow, is a director of the Persian Oil Company and is located in London, where his duties bring him into close touch with official life. The younger son, Thomas Garrow is [text ends]

Letter of 18/12/1917 to Mr D. Watt, Editor of the Ross-shire Journal:

Polnicol, Delny.
Dear Mr Watt
I had yours of 15th instant anent our missing boy. Very many thanks. We have had no further word about him and do not expect to get any for some time to come, that is if he is a Prisoner, and we hope and trust he is. We had a note from his Captain and one from his chaplain and all they gave us was that Willie was out in charge of a Corp on the 30th ultimo and did not return and that there was a hope of his being a Prisoner. Wm. is our third son, he served his time in the ?Unity? Bank and was transferred to Dundee and kept there and joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and rose in the bank there to a position of considerable trust in the Securities Dept. In 1915 he chucked the job and joined up, going to the (unclear) Corp for the usual training, got his commission in the 4th Camerons, which Regiment as you know got so used up that it could not be formed up after. He was shifted to the 1/10th Kings Liverpool Scottish where he has been since and was a 2nd Lieut. He was twice gassed and was home once, got over this and back to his Regiment in a short time. He is a good man and a good soldier. Sorry we have no good photo of him besides ?oddments? (rest of sentence unclear). Bob the C.R. is in Mesopotamia and is Chief of the Rear Conservancy, whatever that may mean. He was made Lieut Col when sent out. Duncan, the second son, is a Director of the Persian Oil Coy. And located in London and is in close touch with the Admiralty. Tom, our fourth, is in Ireland with the 3rd Camerons. He was badly wounded on 31st Aug., was home lately and had all the marks of (rest of sentence unclear). Alex. is a Capt. In Marsailles – a (unclear) dentist to the Forces and has it soft compared to the other three. Please say nothing meantime about any of them except Willie, unless you (unclear) to them casually. They make the subject of a paragraph later on.
Yours in real haste, W. Gordon

See entries below for details of his four brothers

No photo available

Mr Duncan Garrow

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Garrow
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Mr
Regiment: Director of the Persian Oil Company
Home Address: Polnicol

No Headline

Four or five sons – one Brigadier with Cameron Reserves. He was severely wounded in August last and then home recently bore all the marks of having been in the thick of it. Captain Alexander Garrow is a mercantile marine, while a sixth son, a dentist by profession, is serving as a dentist with the Forces. Lt. Garrow remained with this unit. He has seen a good deal of service, was twice gassed and was home for a brief spell on recovering. Lieut. Garrow is a capital type of officer and his friends in the regiment write fondly of him.

Mr Garrow’s eldest son, Lieut-Colonel Robert Garrow is in Mesopotamia at the head of the River Conservancy. He is a distinguished man in the Engineering world and has held several important appointments abroad, coming home to take up special duties for the Government. The second son, Mr Duncan Garrow, is a director of the Persian Oil Company and is located in London, where his duties bring him into close touch with official life. The younger son, Thomas Garrow is [text ends]

Letter of 18/12/1917 to Mr D. Watt, Editor of the Ross-shire Journal:

Polnicol, Delny.
Dear Mr Watt
I had yours of 15th instant anent our missing boy. Very many thanks. We have had no further word about him and do not expect to get any for some time to come, that is if he is a Prisoner, and we hope and trust he is. We had a note from his Captain and one from his chaplain and all they gave us was that Willie was out in charge of a Corp on the 30th ultimo and did not return and that there was a hope of his being a Prisoner. Wm. is our third son, he served his time in the ?Unity? Bank and was transferred to Dundee and kept there and joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and rose in the bank there to a position of considerable trust in the Securities Dept. In 1915 he chucked the job and joined up, going to the (unclear) Corp for the usual training, got his commission in the 4th Camerons, which Regiment as you know got so used up that it could not be formed up after. He was shifted to the 1/10th Kings Liverpool Scottish where he has been since and was a 2nd Lieut. He was twice gassed and was home once, got over this and back to his Regiment in a short time. He is a good man and a good soldier. Sorry we have no good photo of him besides ?oddments? (rest of sentence unclear). Bob the C.R. is in Mesopotamia and is Chief of the Rear Conservancy, whatever that may mean. He was made Lieut Col when sent out. Duncan, the second son, is a Director of the Persian Oil Coy. And located in London and is in close touch with the Admiralty. Tom, our fourth, is in Ireland with the 3rd Camerons. He was badly wounded on 31st Aug., was home lately and had all the marks of (rest of sentence unclear). Alex. is a Capt. In Marsailles – a (unclear) dentist to the Forces and has it soft compared to the other three. Please say nothing meantime about any of them except Willie, unless you (unclear) to them casually. They make the subject of a paragraph later on.
Yours in real haste, W. Gordon

See entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers

No photo available

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Garrow

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Garrow
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Lt Colonel
Regiment: River Conservancy
Home Address: Polnicol

No Headline

Four or five sons – one Brigadier with Cameron Reserves. He was severely wounded in August last and then home recently bore all the marks of having been in the thick of it. Captain Alexander Garrow is a mercantile marine, while a sixth son, a dentist by profession, is serving as a dentist with the Forces. Lt. Garrow remained with this unit. He has seen a good deal of service, was twice gassed and was home for a brief spell on recovering. Lieut. Garrow is a capital type of officer and his friends in the regiment write fondly of him.

Mr Garrow’s eldest son, Lieut-Colonel Robert Garrow is in Mesopotamia at the head of the River Conservancy. He is a distinguished man in the Engineering world and has held several important appointments abroad, coming home to take up special duties for the Government. The second son, Mr Duncan Garrow, is a director of the Persian Oil Company and is located in London, where his duties bring him into close touch with official life. The younger son, Thomas Garrow is [text ends]

Letter of 18/12/1917 to Mr D. Watt, Editor of the Ross-shire Journal:

Polnicol, Delny.
Dear Mr Watt
I had yours of 15th instant anent our missing boy. Very many thanks. We have had no further word about him and do not expect to get any for some time to come, that is if he is a Prisoner, and we hope and trust he is. We had a note from his Captain and one from his chaplain and all they gave us was that Willie was out in charge of a Corp on the 30th ultimo and did not return and that there was a hope of his being a Prisoner. Wm. is our third son, he served his time in the ?Unity? Bank and was transferred to Dundee and kept there and joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and rose in the bank there to a position of considerable trust in the Securities Dept. In 1915 he chucked the job and joined up, going to the (unclear) Corp for the usual training, got his commission in the 4th Camerons, which Regiment as you know got so used up that it could not be formed up after. He was shifted to the 1/10th Kings Liverpool Scottish where he has been since and was a 2nd Lieut. He was twice gassed and was home once, got over this and back to his Regiment in a short time. He is a good man and a good soldier. Sorry we have no good photo of him besides ?oddments? (rest of sentence unclear). Bob the C.R. is in Mesopotamia and is Chief of the Rear Conservancy, whatever that may mean. He was made Lieut Col when sent out. Duncan, the second son, is a Director of the Persian Oil Coy. And located in London and is in close touch with the Admiralty. Tom, our fourth, is in Ireland with the 3rd Camerons. He was badly wounded on 31st Aug., was home lately and had all the marks of (rest of sentence unclear). Alex. is a Capt. In Marsailles – a (unclear) dentist to the Forces and has it soft compared to the other three. Please say nothing meantime about any of them except Willie, unless you (unclear) to them casually. They make the subject of a paragraph later on.
Yours in real haste, W. Gordon

See entries above and entries below for details of his four brothers

No photo available

Brigadier (?) Thomas Garrow

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Garrow
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Brigadier(?)
Regiment: 3rd Cameron Reserves
Home Address: Polnicol

No Headline

Four or five sons – one Brigadier with Cameron Reserves. He was severely wounded in August last and then home recently bore all the marks of having been in the thick of it. Captain Alexander Garrow is a mercantile marine, while a sixth son, a dentist by profession, is serving as a dentist with the Forces. Lt. Garrow remained with this unit. He has seen a good deal of service, was twice gassed and was home for a brief spell on recovering. Lieut. Garrow is a capital type of officer and his friends in the regiment write fondly of him.

Mr Garrow’s eldest son, Lieut-Colonel Robert Garrow is in Mesopotamia at the head of the River Conservancy. He is a distinguished man in the Engineering world and has held several important appointments abroad, coming home to take up special duties for the Government. The second son, Mr Duncan Garrow, is a director of the Persian Oil Company and is located in London, where his duties bring him into close touch with official life. The younger son, Thomas Garrow is [text ends]

Letter of 18/12/1917 to Mr D. Watt, Editor of the Ross-shire Journal:

Polnicol, Delny.
Dear Mr Watt
I had yours of 15th instant anent our missing boy. Very many thanks. We have had no further word about him and do not expect to get any for some time to come, that is if he is a Prisoner, and we hope and trust he is. We had a note from his Captain and one from his chaplain and all they gave us was that Willie was out in charge of a Corp on the 30th ultimo and did not return and that there was a hope of his being a Prisoner. Wm. is our third son, he served his time in the ?Unity? Bank and was transferred to Dundee and kept there and joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and rose in the bank there to a position of considerable trust in the Securities Dept. In 1915 he chucked the job and joined up, going to the (unclear) Corp for the usual training, got his commission in the 4th Camerons, which Regiment as you know got so used up that it could not be formed up after. He was shifted to the 1/10th Kings Liverpool Scottish where he has been since and was a 2nd Lieut. He was twice gassed and was home once, got over this and back to his Regiment in a short time. He is a good man and a good soldier. Sorry we have no good photo of him besides ?oddments? (rest of sentence unclear). Bob the C.R. is in Mesopotamia and is Chief of the Rear Conservancy, whatever that may mean. He was made Lieut Col when sent out. Duncan, the second son, is a Director of the Persian Oil Coy. And located in London and is in close touch with the Admiralty. Tom, our fourth, is in Ireland with the 3rd Camerons. He was badly wounded on 31st Aug., was home lately and had all the marks of (rest of sentence unclear). Alex. is a Capt. In Marsailles – a (unclear) dentist to the Forces and has it soft compared to the other three. Please say nothing meantime about any of them except Willie, unless you (unclear) to them casually. They make the subject of a paragraph later on.
Yours in real haste, W. Gordon

See entry below and entries above for details of his four brothers

No photo available

Lieutenant William Garrow

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Garrow
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment:
Home Address: Polnicol

No Headline

Four or five sons – one Brigadier with Cameron Reserves. He was severely wounded in August last and then home recently bore all the marks of having been in the thick of it. Captain Alexander Garrow is a mercantile marine, while a sixth son, a dentist by profession, is serving as a dentist with the Forces. Lt. Garrow remained with this unit. He has seen a good deal of service, was twice gassed and was home for a brief spell on recovering. Lieut. Garrow is a capital type of officer and his friends in the regiment write fondly of him.

Mr Garrow’s eldest son, Lieut-Colonel Robert Garrow is in Mesopotamia at the head of the River Conservancy. He is a distinguished man in the Engineering world and has held several important appointments abroad, coming home to take up special duties for the Government. The second son, Mr Duncan Garrow, is a director of the Persian Oil Company and is located in London, where his duties bring him into close touch with official life. The younger son, Thomas Garrow is [text ends]

Letter of 18/12/1917 to Mr D. Watt, Editor of the Ross-shire Journal:

Polnicol, Delny.
Dear Mr Watt
I had yours of 15th instant anent our missing boy. Very many thanks. We have had no further word about him and do not expect to get any for some time to come, that is if he is a Prisoner, and we hope and trust he is. We had a note from his Captain and one from his chaplain and all they gave us was that Willie was out in charge of a Corp on the 30th ultimo and did not return and that there was a hope of his being a Prisoner. Wm. is our third son, he served his time in the ?Unity? Bank and was transferred to Dundee and kept there and joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and rose in the bank there to a position of considerable trust in the Securities Dept. In 1915 he chucked the job and joined up, going to the (unclear) Corp for the usual training, got his commission in the 4th Camerons, which Regiment as you know got so used up that it could not be formed up after. He was shifted to the 1/10th Kings Liverpool Scottish where he has been since and was a 2nd Lieut. He was twice gassed and was home once, got over this and back to his Regiment in a short time. He is a good man and a good soldier. Sorry we have no good photo of him besides ?oddments? (rest of sentence unclear). Bob the C.R. is in Mesopotamia and is Chief of the Rear Conservancy, whatever that may mean. He was made Lieut Col when sent out. Duncan, the second son, is a Director of the Persian Oil Coy. And located in London and is in close touch with the Admiralty. Tom, our fourth, is in Ireland with the 3rd Camerons. He was badly wounded on 31st Aug., was home lately and had all the marks of (rest of sentence unclear). Alex. is a Capt. In Marsailles – a (unclear) dentist to the Forces and has it soft compared to the other three. Please say nothing meantime about any of them except Willie, unless you (unclear) to them casually. They make the subject of a paragraph later on.
Yours in real haste, W. Gordon

See entries above for details of his four brothers