Kilmuir and Logie Easter WW I page 3

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Photo: #5963

Munro William D, Corp, Glasgow Ex Delny

Corporal William D. Munro

Date of Paper: 18.01.1918
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): William D.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Lewis Gun Section, Seaforths
Home Address: 439 Garscube Road, Glasgow (formerly Madras Street, Inverness)

No Headline

200372 Corpl. Wm. D. Munro, Lewis Gun Section, Seaforths, who has been awarded the Military Medal, is the eldest son of the late Mr Wm. D. Munro, carting contractor, Madras Street, Inverness, and of Mrs A. Fraser, 439 Garscube Road, Glasgow. Cpl. Munro joined the Ross-shires in September 1914, and went to France with the first draft in February 1915. He has been on the Western front, except for leave, ever since, and has come through many battles without a scratch. He was home in October last. Before the war he was a railway porter at Delny station.

A younger brother is serving with the R.S.F. in Egypt.

A photograph of Cpl. Munro appears today.

Photo: #6287

Murray Alexander, Pte, Kildary

Private Alexander Murray

Date of Paper: 17.01.1919
Surname: Murray
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Seaforths
Home Address: Marybank, Kildary

THE LATE PTE. ALEX. MURRAY, 2nd SEAFORTHS, KILDARY

The death in action of Pte. Alexander Murray, 2nd Seaforths, husband of Mrs Murray, Marybank, Kildary, Ross-shire, was recently announced in the Journal. Deceased was well known in the Kildary district, where he was the first married man in the parish to volunteer under the Derby Scheme. From boyhood he had been employed at Balnagown. He was hallboy at the Castle, then footman, and piper, and latterly gamekeeper. His death occasioned great regret in the district where his associations were so intimate and where he was greatly esteemed, and every heart throbs in sympathy with the sorrowing widow and young family, by whom he is survived.

Writing on October 26, the Rev. J. Gray, Chaplain to the 2nd Seaforths, in a letter to the widow, says: “You will have received the bad news about your husband, 40040 Pte. A. Murray, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders; I write with great regret to confirm the tidings. The battalion went into the line on the 18th October and took part in a most successful advance which secured the capture of two French villages and the release of several hundreds of civilians. On Wednesday morning we entered the second village and we were billeted in the houses and cellars of the village. I saw your husband in the forenoon. He was in good spirits. The enemy shelled the village in the course of the day and about five o’ clock most unfortunately your dear husband was killed by a piece of shrapnel while sitting round a fire with the other servants in B Coy’s billet. Pte. Maclaren (Aberfeldy) was wounded with the same shell. Your husband suffered no pain – death being instantaneous. We brought his body to a British Military Cemetery in the first village captured and there we reverently buried him along with Capt. Hector Munro, M.C., and seven other men of the Battalion.

“At the service, which I conducted at the grave, we gave thanks for the good soldier faithful unto death and we thought of the friends in the homeland who now mourn him. The pipers played a lament. In the foreign land all possible honour was done to our beloved comrade. While nothing we can say will ever make up for the loss you and your children have sustained, it may comfort you a little to know that your husband was held in the highest regard out here. His officer will write you himself, expressing his own regret. Meanwhile the Colonel, officers, and men join in sending you deepest sympathy. It is our prayer that you will have strength given you to endure the crushing sorrow. May the God of all comfort be with you and the fatherless children. Your dear husband has laid down his life for his own loved ones and has heard the welcome of the Master, ‘Well done good and faithful servant’.”

Captain Donald Munro, 2nd Seaforths, with whom Pte. Murray was on intimate terms from boyhood, writes: “I know how useless it is to offer sympathy to you in your awful loss, but I thought I must write. Your husband’s death is deplored by us all – officers and men. He was a splendid soldier and was respected by everyone. Try to be brave for his sake and the bairnies. It will be a little comfort for you to know that he did not suffer and that everything was done to show our respect for a gallant comrade. I personally saw the last offices done to the remains, and the grave is in a beautiful spot, and is marked by a cross. The body is next to that of Captain Munro of Foulis. As a friend of your husband I can only say how much I feel his death, but in time we will all be proud that he died for the greatest cause.”

Photo: #6286

Robertson Alick, Piper, Kildary

Piper Alick Robertson

Date of Paper: 21.01.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Piper
Regiment: E Coy., 3rd Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

No Headline

Mrs Robertson, Lamington, Kildary, is a widow, and has the proud distinction of having given five sons to the Army and Navy. One of these, Tom, was killed at Neuve Chapelle; two others are at the front; one is in the Navy, and the eldest, Alick, is in training at Invergordon.

We have the privilege of reproducing the photographs of Mrs Robertson and her five sons.
Stoker James Robertson, Mess 7, Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, was employed by King & Co., Glasgow, as a traction engine driver until a few weeks ago, when he enlisted in the Navy.

741 Private Murdo Robertson, D Company, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, and doing duty in France, was serving with his regiment in Egypt at the outbreak of war. He was, before enlisting, employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

9272 Private Donald Robertson, 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was doing duty in France, but is now throught to be at the Dardanelles. He was serving with his regiment in India when war broke out, and was drafted from there to France.

13163 Piper Alick Robertson, E Company, 3rd Cameron Highlanders, Invergordon, oldest son of Mrs Robertson, is a gardener to trade, and was employed at Glen Urquhart before joining the Camerons.

710 Private Tom Robertson, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, killed at Neuve Chapelle, was serving in India before the war broke out. He also originally was employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

See entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6289

Robertson Donald, Pte, Kildary

Private Donald Robertson

Date of Paper: 21.01.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

No Headline

Mrs Robertson, Lamington, Kildary, is a widow, and has the proud distinction of having given five sons to the Army and Navy. One of these, Tom, was killed at Neuve Chapelle; two others are at the front; one is in the Navy, and the eldest, Alick, is in training at Invergordon.

We have the privilege of reproducing the photographs of Mrs Robertson and her five sons.
Stoker James Robertson, Mess 7, Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, was employed by King & Co., Glasgow, as a traction engine driver until a few weeks ago, when he enlisted in the Navy.

741 Private Murdo Robertson, D Company, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, and doing duty in France, was serving with his regiment in Egypt at the outbreak of war. He was, before enlisting, employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

9272 Private Donald Robertson, 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was doing duty in France, but is now throught to be at the Dardanelles. He was serving with his regiment in India when war broke out, and was drafted from there to France.

13163 Piper Alick Robertson, E Company, 3rd Cameron Highlanders, Invergordon, oldest son of Mrs Robertson, is a gardener to trade, and was employed at Glen Urquhart before joining the Camerons.

710 Private Tom Robertson, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, killed at Neuve Chapelle, was serving in India before the war broke out. He also originally was employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

See entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6297

Robertson James, Stoker, Kildary

Stoker James Robertson

Date of Paper: 21.01.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): James
Rank: Stoker
Regiment: RN
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

No Headline

Mrs Robertson, Lamington, Kildary, is a widow, and has the proud distinction of having given five sons to the Army and Navy. One of these, Tom, was killed at Neuve Chapelle; two others are at the front; one is in the Navy, and the eldest, Alick, is in training at Invergordon.

We have the privilege of reproducing the photographs of Mrs Robertson and her five sons.
Stoker James Robertson, Mess 7, Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, was employed by King & Co., Glasgow, as a traction engine driver until a few weeks ago, when he enlisted in the Navy.

741 Private Murdo Robertson, D Company, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, and doing duty in France, was serving with his regiment in Egypt at the outbreak of war. He was, before enlisting, employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

9272 Private Donald Robertson, 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was doing duty in France, but is now throught to be at the Dardanelles. He was serving with his regiment in India when war broke out, and was drafted from there to France.

13163 Piper Alick Robertson, E Company, 3rd Cameron Highlanders, Invergordon, oldest son of Mrs Robertson, is a gardener to trade, and was employed at Glen Urquhart before joining the Camerons.

710 Private Tom Robertson, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, killed at Neuve Chapelle, was serving in India before the war broke out. He also originally was employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

See entries above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6292

Robertson Murdo, Pte, Kildary

Private Murdo Robertson

Date of Paper: 21.01.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Private
Regiment: D Coy., 2nd Gordon Highlanders
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

No Headline

Mrs Robertson, Lamington, Kildary, is a widow, and has the proud distinction of having given five sons to the Army and Navy. One of these, Tom, was killed at Neuve Chapelle; two others are at the front; one is in the Navy, and the eldest, Alick, is in training at Invergordon.

We have the privilege of reproducing the photographs of Mrs Robertson and her five sons.
Stoker James Robertson, Mess 7, Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, was employed by King & Co., Glasgow, as a traction engine driver until a few weeks ago, when he enlisted in the Navy.

741 Private Murdo Robertson, D Company, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, and doing duty in France, was serving with his regiment in Egypt at the outbreak of war. He was, before enlisting, employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

9272 Private Donald Robertson, 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was doing duty in France, but is now throught to be at the Dardanelles. He was serving with his regiment in India when war broke out, and was drafted from there to France.

13163 Piper Alick Robertson, E Company, 3rd Cameron Highlanders, Invergordon, oldest son of Mrs Robertson, is a gardener to trade, and was employed at Glen Urquhart before joining the Camerons.

710 Private Tom Robertson, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, killed at Neuve Chapelle, was serving in India before the war broke out. He also originally was employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

See entry below and entries above for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6294

Robertson Thomas, Pte, Kildary

Private Thomas Robertson

Date of Paper: 21.01.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

No Headline

Mrs Robertson, Lamington, Kildary, is a widow, and has the proud distinction of having given five sons to the Army and Navy. One of these, Tom, was killed at Neuve Chapelle; two others are at the front; one is in the Navy, and the eldest, Alick, is in training at Invergordon.

We have the privilege of reproducing the photographs of Mrs Robertson and her five sons.
Stoker James Robertson, Mess 7, Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth, was employed by King & Co., Glasgow, as a traction engine driver until a few weeks ago, when he enlisted in the Navy.

741 Private Murdo Robertson, D Company, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, and doing duty in France, was serving with his regiment in Egypt at the outbreak of war. He was, before enlisting, employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

9272 Private Donald Robertson, 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was doing duty in France, but is now throught to be at the Dardanelles. He was serving with his regiment in India when war broke out, and was drafted from there to France.

13163 Piper Alick Robertson, E Company, 3rd Cameron Highlanders, Invergordon, oldest son of Mrs Robertson, is a gardener to trade, and was employed at Glen Urquhart before joining the Camerons.

710 Private Tom Robertson, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, killed at Neuve Chapelle, was serving in India before the war broke out. He also originally was employed in agricultural work in Ardross district.

See entries above for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6288

Robertson Donald, Pte, Kildary

Private Donald Robertson

Date of Paper: 30.06.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balnagown, Kildary

SEAFORTH SERGEANT'S PROMOTION

The many friends of Sergt. Jas. A. Robertson, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Robertson, Balnagown, Kildary, will be pleased to hear that he has been promoted to Coy. Sergt. Major. Sergt. Robertson went out with the Battalion in November 1914, and has been with it ever since. He took part in all the engagements in which the Battalion fought, and he has, so far, luckily escaped uninjured. The best wishes are extended to Sergeant Robertson on his promotion.

A brother of Sergeant Robertson, Mr Donald Robertson, Balnagown, Kildary, also served six months with the Battalion, but was invalided home and discharged owing to ill-health.

A photograph of Sergt. Robertson is reproduced today.

Date of Paper: 10.08.1917

THE POET OF THE 4th SEAFORTHS

“D. R., Kildary” has become familiar initials at the foot of some excellent verses appearing from time to time in the Ross-shire Journal. The martial spirit which permeates so many of the poems is accounted for by the fact that “D. R.” is an ex-territorial, Private D. Robertson, Seaforths, Kildary, a brother of Coy. Sergt.-Major James Robertson, M.C., 4th Seaforths. Pte. Robertson mobilised in August 1914 with the battalion, and went to the war station at Bedford. He had just recovered from a somewhat severe illness. After training for a few months his health gave way again, and he was discharged. To one of such temperament and spirit this was a great disappointment. He returned to Balnagown Castle, where he is a gardener, and since then has been in constant communication with many of his old comrades, and has closely followed the brilliant deeds of the old battalion. Re-examined recently for further service, he was unable to reach category A, but it is not improbable that he may again be permitted to rejoin his unit and be of some service. Pte. Robertson has the true spirit of the poet. His imagery is at times very delicate, his thoughts lofty and inspired, and his rhythm and rhyme are alike musical and pleasant. At the front his verses are widely read by men of the Seaforths, and he has well earned the rank of poet to the battalion.

A photograph of Private Robertson appears today.

See entry below for details of his brother james A. Robertson

Photo: #6283

Robertson James A, CSM, Kildary

Sergeant James A. Robertson

Date of Paper: 30.06.1916
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): James A.
Rank: Sergeant (later Sergeant Major)
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balnagown, Kildary

SEAFORTH SERGEANT'S PROMOTION

The many friends of Sergt. Jas. A. Robertson, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Robertson, Balnagown, Kildary, will be pleased to hear that he has been promoted to Coy. Sergt. Major. Sergt. Robertson went out with the Battalion in November 1914, and has been with it ever since. He took part in all the engagements in which the Battalion fought, and he has, so far, luckily escaped uninjured. The best wishes are extended to Sergeant Robertson on his promotion.

A brother of Sergeant Robertson, Mr Donald Robertson, Balnagown, Kildary, also served six months with the Battalion, but was invalided home and discharged owing to ill-health.

A photograph of Sergt. Robertson is reproduced today.

Date of Paper: 15.06.1917

MILITARY CROSS FOR SEAFORTH WARRANT OFFICER

Coy. Sergt.-Major Jas. A. Robertson, Seaforths, who was awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service and gallantry on the field during recent fighting, is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Robertson, Balnagown, and a native of Kildary. He has seen much active service since the outbreak of war, being continuously at the Front since November 1914, and has taken part in many hot engagements. With modesty, characteristic of the true Highland soldier, he refuses to talk of how he won the distinction, but remarked: “I have only done my duty.” He is now in a convalescent camp in France recuperating after a slight wound, and his many friends in Ross-shire extend to him their congratulations, and hope to see him home soon.

Date of Paper: 10.01.1919

EX 4th SEAFORTH WARRANT OFFICER HONOURED

Coy. Sergt.-Major Robertson, M.C., late of the 4th Seaforths, Balnagown, Kildary, attended the Investiture by the King at Buckingham Palace, and was presented by His Majesty with the Military Cross.

Sergt.-Major Robertson, who was discharged a few weeks ago owing to severe wounds received in the great offensive last March, has a military record of which any Territorial might be proud. Mobilising on 4th August, 1914, he proceeded to France in November of the same year, and served continuously in the line for three years and a half, taking part in all the battles in which his unit was involved. During the battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1917, when all his company officers were either killed or wounded, he reorganised the [obliterated] and, leading the attack, captured the objective. For his gallantry, example and resource, he was awarded the Military Cross. He served till the following March, when he was severely wounded and eventually discharged unfit for further service. Sergt.-Major Robertson also wears the 1914 Star.

The parishioners of Logie-Easter desired to show their appreciation of Sergt.-Major Robertson’s services, and the other evening he was met in the Schoolhouse and presented with a gold watch, suitably inscribed, and a wallet of Treasury notes. On the motion of Rev. Mr Macdonald, Parish Church, Rev Mr Macleod took the chair, and briefly referred to Sergt.-Major Robertson’s fine military record, and expressed the pleasure it gave them that evening of showing their gratitude to one of the many brave young men who went forward to meet the enemy, many of whom, alas! would return no more. Mr Logan, Pitmaduthie, made the presentation. Sgt.-Major Robertson suitably replied. He was glad, he said, to have been a member of the County Battalion and also of the [obliterated] Division. He thanked all for their kindness.

Sergt.-Major Robertson leaves in a day or two to take up an important appointment under the Town Council of Motherwell. Sergt.-Major Robertson is a son of Mr and Mrs Robertson, Balnagown, Kildary, and a grandson of the late Donald Macpherson, tailor, Delny. His brother, Pte. D. Robertson, late 4th Seaforths, may well be described as the poet of the regiment.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Robertson

Photo: #5970

Ross Donald, Pte, Delny

Private Donald Ross

Date of Paper: 22.09.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Seaforths.
Home Address: Polnicol Cottages, Delny

THREE GALLANT ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIERS:

ONE MAKES THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

Three sons of Mr and Mrs John Ross, Polnicol Cottages, Delny, Ross-shire, have served their country in its hour of peril, and one of them, the eldest, has made the supreme sacrifice.
Sergt. Tom Ross, of the bombing section, Cameron Highlanders (“Lochiel’s”), was killed in action on 19th July. He joined the regiment at the beginning of the war, went to France in May, 1915, and was with the regiment until gassed at Loos on 25th September,1915. He rejoined a few weeks afterwards, and was home on furlough in January, 1916. He had not been long in France until he got his stripes one by one. He was a keen soldier, although he had no previous knowledge of the Army. He was buried on ground destined to be historic in the history of France and of the world’s war.

Lieut. Arch. Hunter, acting company officer, writing to Sergt. Ross’s sister, says: “It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of your brother’s death. He made the supreme sacrifice, so noble and willingly, and will never be forgotten by us or by the country he loved so well. I know what little value words are in the face of your great loss, but perhaps it will comfort you to know of my own and the company’s sincere sympathy. In giving away his life so freely your brother has gained that which is [obliterated] and eternal.”

Captain Charles Sheringham, commanding the company, and who was wounded on the same day, writing from Wolverhampton to Miss Ross, says: ” I feel I must write [obliterated] line of sympathy in your great loss. Your brother is a great loss to us. I know from experience what a splendid fellow he was. As a N.C.O. in the company he did sterling work, both in the trenches, in training, and in action. I had the utmost confidence in him, and promoted him full sergeant before going into action. It was with the deepest regret that I learnt of his death. May God, who has seen fit to take away his life , help you and his family to bravely bear his loss, and face the future, proud at last in the knowledge that he lived and died as a brave man and good soldier.”

Pte. Donald Ross, late 1st Seaforths, a younger son of Mr and Mrs Ross, served several years in the Army. During the great part of his time he was in India with his regiment, where he had seen some frontier fighting. He was a reservist and was called up at the beginning of the war. He went to France with the 2nd Seaforths, and was with them during the historic retreat from Mons and onward, until wounded severely in the head at Lille, being afterwards discharged as physically unfit for further service.

Piper John Ross, Lochiel’s Camerons, another son, had previously been in the 4th Seaforths, but, time-expired before the war, [obliterated].

See entries below for details of his brothers

Photo: #5966

Ross John, Piper, Delny

Piper John Ross

Date of Paper: 22.09.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): John
Rank: Piper
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Polnicol Cottages, Delny

THREE GALLANT ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIERS:

ONE MAKES THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

Three sons of Mr and Mrs John Ross, Polnicol Cottages, Delny, Ross-shire, have served their country in its hour of peril, and one of them, the eldest, has made the supreme sacrifice.
Sergt. Tom Ross, of the bombing section, Cameron Highlanders (“Lochiel’s”), was killed in action on 19th July. He joined the regiment at the beginning of the war, went to France in May, 1915, and was with the regiment until gassed at Loos on 25th September,1915. He rejoined a few weeks afterwards, and was home on furlough in January, 1916. He had not been long in France until he got his stripes one by one. He was a keen soldier, although he had no previous knowledge of the Army. He was buried on ground destined to be historic in the history of France and of the world’s war.

Lieut. Arch. Hunter, acting company officer, writing to Sergt. Ross’s sister, says: “It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of your brother’s death. He made the supreme sacrifice, so noble and willingly, and will never be forgotten by us or by the country he loved so well. I know what little value words are in the face of your great loss, but perhaps it will comfort you to know of my own and the company’s sincere sympathy. In giving away his life so freely your brother has gained that which is [obliterated] and eternal.”

Captain Charles Sheringham, commanding the company, and who was wounded on the same day, writing from Wolverhampton to Miss Ross, says: ” I feel I must write [obliterated] line of sympathy in your great loss. Your brother is a great loss to us. I know from experience what a splendid fellow he was. As a N.C.O. in the company he did sterling work, both in the trenches, in training, and in action. I had the utmost confidence in him, and promoted him full sergeant before going into action. It was with the deepest regret that I learnt of his death. May God, who has seen fit to take away his life , help you and his family to bravely bear his loss, and face the future, proud at last in the knowledge that he lived and died as a brave man and good soldier.”

Pte. Donald Ross, late 1st Seaforths, a younger son of Mr and Mrs Ross, served several years in the Army. During the great part of his time he was in India with his regiment, where he had seen some frontier fighting. He was a reservist and was called up at the beginning of the war. He went to France with the 2nd Seaforths, and was with them during the historic retreat from Mons and onward, until wounded severely in the head at Lille, being afterwards discharged as physically unfit for further service.

Piper John Ross, Lochiel’s Camerons, another son, had previously been in the 4th Seaforths, but, time-expired before the war, [obliterated].

See entry below and entry above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5978

Macleod William, Pte, Delny

Sergeant Thomas Ross

Date of Paper: 22.09.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Polnicol Cottages, Delny

THREE GALLANT ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIERS:

ONE MAKES THE SUPREME SACRIFICE

Three sons of Mr and Mrs John Ross, Polnicol Cottages, Delny, Ross-shire, have served their country in its hour of peril, and one of them, the eldest, has made the supreme sacrifice.
Sergt. Tom Ross, of the bombing section, Cameron Highlanders (“Lochiel’s”), was killed in action on 19th July. He joined the regiment at the beginning of the war, went to France in May, 1915, and was with the regiment until gassed at Loos on 25th September,1915. He rejoined a few weeks afterwards, and was home on furlough in January, 1916. He had not been long in France until he got his stripes one by one. He was a keen soldier, although he had no previous knowledge of the Army. He was buried on ground destined to be historic in the history of France and of the world’s war.

Lieut. Arch. Hunter, acting company officer, writing to Sergt. Ross’s sister, says: “It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of your brother’s death. He made the supreme sacrifice, so noble and willingly, and will never be forgotten by us or by the country he loved so well. I know what little value words are in the face of your great loss, but perhaps it will comfort you to know of my own and the company’s sincere sympathy. In giving away his life so freely your brother has gained that which is [obliterated] and eternal.”

Captain Charles Sheringham, commanding the company, and who was wounded on the same day, writing from Wolverhampton to Miss Ross, says: ” I feel I must write [obliterated] line of sympathy in your great loss. Your brother is a great loss to us. I know from experience what a splendid fellow he was. As a N.C.O. in the company he did sterling work, both in the trenches, in training, and in action. I had the utmost confidence in him, and promoted him full sergeant before going into action. It was with the deepest regret that I learnt of his death. May God, who has seen fit to take away his life , help you and his family to bravely bear his loss, and face the future, proud at last in the knowledge that he lived and died as a brave man and good soldier.”

Pte. Donald Ross, late 1st Seaforths, a younger son of Mr and Mrs Ross, served several years in the Army. During the great part of his time he was in India with his regiment, where he had seen some frontier fighting. He was a reservist and was called up at the beginning of the war. He went to France with the 2nd Seaforths, and was with them during the historic retreat from Mons and onward, until wounded severely in the head at Lille, being afterwards discharged as physically unfit for further service.

Piper John Ross, Lochiel’s Camerons, another son, had previously been in the 4th Seaforths, but, time-expired before the war, [obliterated].

See entries above for details of his brothers

Photo: #6295

Stirling William, Pte, Kildary

William Stirling

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Stirling
First Name(s): William
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

KILDARY SEAFORTH KILLED

Mrs Stirling, Lamington, Kildary, has just received notice of the death, through wounds, on 24th November, of her son, William. There is something more than usually pathetic about Willie’s death. He was through the South African war and did not receive a wound. When the present war broke out, he was sent to the front with his regiment, the Seaforths. He escaped wounds till the taking of Ypres, when he was seriously wounded in the thigh . The bone was very much shattered, and, after being treated for a long time in England, he was sent home, where he was confined to bed for some time. He then reported himself at Dingwall, and after a medical examination was ordered to report for light duty. His wound again gave trouble, and he was removed to hospital at Cromarty. After being there for some time, he was dicharged as unfit for the Army, and was granted a pension.

Afterwards he made a fair recovery, and being determined to get back to front, he re-enlisted in the Seaforths, and was at once drafted off on active service. As recorded, he received his death wound on 21st November, and succumbed in hospital at Boulogne on the 24th. Much sympathy is extended to the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. Other two of her sons are in the Army, Walter and David.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

David Stirling

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Stirling
First Name(s): David
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

KILDARY SEAFORTH KILLED

Mrs Stirling, Lamington, Kildary, has just received notice of the death, through wounds, on 24th November, of her son, William. There is something more than usually pathetic about Willie’s death. He was through the South African war and did not receive a wound. When the present war broke out, he was sent to the front with his regiment, the Seaforths. He escaped wounds till the taking of Ypres, when he was seriously wounded in the thigh . The bone was very much shattered, and, after being treated for a long time in England, he was sent home, where he was confined to bed for some time. He then reported himself at Dingwall, and after a medical examination was ordered to report for light duty. His wound again gave trouble, and he was removed to hospital at Cromarty. After being there for some time, he was dicharged as unfit for the Army, and was granted a pension.

Afterwards he made a fair recovery, and being determined to get back to front, he re-enlisted in the Seaforths, and was at once drafted off on active service. As recorded, he received his death wound on 21st November, and succumbed in hospital at Boulogne on the 24th. Much sympathy is extended to the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. Other two of her sons are in the Army, Walter and David.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Walter Stirling

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Stirling
First Name(s): Walter
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Lamington, Kildary

KILDARY SEAFORTH KILLED

Mrs Stirling, Lamington, Kildary, has just received notice of the death, through wounds, on 24th November, of her son, William. There is something more than usually pathetic about Willie’s death. He was through the South African war and did not receive a wound. When the present war broke out, he was sent to the front with his regiment, the Seaforths. He escaped wounds till the taking of Ypres, when he was seriously wounded in the thigh . The bone was very much shattered, and, after being treated for a long time in England, he was sent home, where he was confined to bed for some time. He then reported himself at Dingwall, and after a medical examination was ordered to report for light duty. His wound again gave trouble, and he was removed to hospital at Cromarty. After being there for some time, he was dicharged as unfit for the Army, and was granted a pension.

Afterwards he made a fair recovery, and being determined to get back to front, he re-enlisted in the Seaforths, and was at once drafted off on active service. As recorded, he received his death wound on 21st November, and succumbed in hospital at Boulogne on the 24th. Much sympathy is extended to the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. Other two of her sons are in the Army, Walter and David.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5980

Vass Sgt, Delny

Lance Sergeant Vass

Date of Paper: 13.09.1916
Surname: Vass
First Name(s): Not stated
Rank: Lance-Sergeant
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Broomhill, Delny

No Headline

Above is a photograph of Lance-Segeant Vass, who has been promoted sergeant. He is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Vass, Broomhill, Delny. Sergeant Vass went with the 4th Seaforths to France in November, 1914, and is still with the battalion. In civil life he was employed with Mr Wilson, grocer, Invergordon.

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