You are welcome to comment on these pictures

Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society welcome further information and comments about any person or photos on our website. Adding a comment means that you accept our Privacy Policy.

Photo: #6587

Macdonald Duncan, Pte, Torridon

Private Duncan Macdonald

Date of Paper: 16.08.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealanders
Home Address: The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

THREE INVERALLIGIN SOLDIERS

Photographs of the three soldier sons of Widow A. Macdonald, The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon, are reproduced today. Two of them are prisoners of war in Germany, and the other is serving in France.

Three handsome men, they responded with alacrity to the call of country.

Lance Corporal Finlay Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the county battalion on the outbreak of war, trained at Bedford, and went to France in November, 1914, for which he is entitled to the 1914 Star of the First Seven Divisions. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle in the first battle in which the 1/4th Seaforths took part, and when so many sons of Ross suffered, he was invalided home for a few months. Wounded a second time, after recovering he returned up the line, and serving in many engagements, including the battle of Cambrai where he received his lance corporal’s stripe and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field, he was posted to the stretcher bearer section of his unit. He took part in the fighting on March 21/23, and on the latter date was made prisoner of war, and is now in Germany. Previous to joining up, for a number of years he was proprieter of the Lochailort Hotel.

Private Duncan Macdonald, the second son, is serving in France with the New Zealanders. He went to new Zealand 11 years ago, and when war broke out he was manager of a large sheep ranch in the Wiararapa district of the North Island of New Zealand. He joined the New Zealand Rifle Brigade in the beginning of 1917, and after training in New Zealand and England went to France in May of this year.

Private Murdo Macdonald, H.L.I., as recently reported, was made prisoner of war on 1st April last. Murdo joined up when a boy of 16 years of age. Too young for service he was discharged. On becoming 18 years of age he rejoined, and was posted to the Seaforths. He went to France in March last, and was made prisoner in course of the defensive actions against the German attempt to capture the Channel Ports. Previous to joining up he was a waiter in the Grant Arms Hotel, Grantown.

He is a prisoner of war in Limberg Camp, unwounded, and well.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6586

Macdonald Finlay, L Corp, Torridon

Lance Corporal Finlay Macdonald

Date of Paper: 16.08.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Finlay
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

THREE INVERALLIGIN SOLDIERS

Photographs of the three soldier sons of Widow A. Macdonald, The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon, are reproduced today. Two of them are prisoners of war in Germany, and the other is serving in France.

Three handsome men, they responded with alacrity to the call of country.

Lance Corporal Finlay Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the county battalion on the outbreak of war, trained at Bedford, and went to France in November, 1914, for which he is entitled to the 1914 Star of the First Seven Divisions. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle in the first battle in which the 1/4th Seaforths took part, and when so many sons of Ross suffered, he was invalided home for a few months. Wounded a second time, after recovering he returned up the line, and serving in many engagements, including the battle of Cambrai where he received his lance corporal’s stripe and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field, he was posted to the stretcher bearer section of his unit. He took part in the fighting on March 21/23, and on the latter date was made prisoner of war, and is now in Germany. Previous to joining up, for a number of years he was proprieter of the Lochailort Hotel.

Private Duncan Macdonald, the second son, is serving in France with the New Zealanders. He went to new Zealand 11 years ago, and when war broke out he was manager of a large sheep ranch in the Wiararapa district of the North Island of New Zealand. He joined the New Zealand Rifle Brigade in the beginning of 1917, and after training in New Zealand and England went to France in May of this year.

Private Murdo Macdonald, H.L.I., as recently reported, was made prisoner of war on 1st April last. Murdo joined up when a boy of 16 years of age. Too young for service he was discharged. On becoming 18 years of age he rejoined, and was posted to the Seaforths. He went to France in March last, and was made prisoner in course of the defensive actions against the German attempt to capture the Channel Ports. Previous to joining up he was a waiter in the Grant Arms Hotel, Grantown.

He is a prisoner of war in Limberg Camp, unwounded, and well.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6591

Macdonald Murdo, Pte, Torridon

Private Murdo Macdonald

Date of Paper: 16.08.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Private
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

THREE INVERALLIGIN SOLDIERS

Photographs of the three soldier sons of Widow A. Macdonald, The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon, are reproduced today. Two of them are prisoners of war in Germany, and the other is serving in France.

Three handsome men, they responded with alacrity to the call of country.

Lance Corporal Finlay Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the county battalion on the outbreak of war, trained at Bedford, and went to France in November, 1914, for which he is entitled to the 1914 Star of the First Seven Divisions. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle in the first battle in which the 1/4th Seaforths took part, and when so many sons of Ross suffered, he was invalided home for a few months. Wounded a second time, after recovering he returned up the line, and serving in many engagements, including the battle of Cambrai where he received his lance corporal’s stripe and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field, he was posted to the stretcher bearer section of his unit. He took part in the fighting on March 21/23, and on the latter date was made prisoner of war, and is now in Germany. Previous to joining up, for a number of years he was proprieter of the Lochailort Hotel.

Private Duncan Macdonald, the second son, is serving in France with the New Zealanders. He went to new Zealand 11 years ago, and when war broke out he was manager of a large sheep ranch in the Wiararapa district of the North Island of New Zealand. He joined the New Zealand Rifle Brigade in the beginning of 1917, and after training in New Zealand and England went to France in May of this year.

Private Murdo Macdonald, H.L.I., as recently reported, was made prisoner of war on 1st April last. Murdo joined up when a boy of 16 years of age. Too young for service he was discharged. On becoming 18 years of age he rejoined, and was posted to the Seaforths. He went to France in March last, and was made prisoner in course of the defensive actions against the German attempt to capture the Channel Ports. Previous to joining up he was a waiter in the Grant Arms Hotel, Grantown.

He is a prisoner of war in Limberg Camp, unwounded, and well.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6589

Macdonald John, Pte, Torridon

Private John Macdonald

Date of Paper: 20.06.1919
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders / Royal Engineers
Home Address: Edinburgh, ex Torridon

A TORRIDON SEAFORTH GETS THE MILITARY MEDAL

Private John Macdonald enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders in November, 1915. He was wounded four times and awarded the Military Medal. He is now in the Royal Engineers, and still out in Germany.

He is a son of Mr Munro Macdonald, Torridon, was resident in Edinburgh, and married to Jessie, daughter of the late Mr John Munro and Mrs Munro, Ardross Village, Alness.

Photo: #6312

Maciver Alick, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private Alick Maciver

Date of Paper: No date
Surname: Maciver
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gairloch Company, Seaforths
Home Address: Cromasaig, Kinlochewe

No Headline

Private Alick Maciver, who also belongs to the Gairloch Coy., was wounded at Neve Chapelle, and sent to No. 12 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, for three weeks, after which he returned to the trenches, and is still there. He had been in the Lovat Scouts, but had not been abroad. Pte. Maciver previous to the war was also a gamekeeper at Cromasaig, Kinlochewe.

Private John Maciver, Cromasaig, Kinlochewe, was in the South African War with the Lovat Scouts.

On the termination of that war he took to motor driving, and was chauffeur to a private gentleman in Edinburgh for nine years. He has now joined the Army Service Corps, and is at present doing duty in France

See entry below for details of his brother John Maciver

Photo: #6315

Maciver John, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private John Maciver

Date of Paper: No date
Surname: Maciver
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Cromasaig, Kinlochewe

No Headline

Private Alick Maciver, who also belongs to the Gairloch Coy., was wounded at Neve Chapelle, and sent to No. 12 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, for three weeks, after which he returned to the trenches, and is still there. He had been in the Lovat Scouts, but had not been abroad. Pte. Maciver previous to the war was also a gamekeeper at Cromasaig, Kinlochewe.

Private John Maciver, Cromasaig, Kinlochewe, was in the South African War with the Lovat Scouts.

On the termination of that war he took to motor driving, and was chauffeur to a private gentleman in Edinburgh for nine years. He has now joined the Army Service Corps, and is at present doing duty in France

See entry above for details of his brother Alick Maciver

Photo: #6310

Maciver Donald, Corp, Kinlochewe

Corporal Donald Maciver

Date of Paper: 03.12.1915
Surname: Maciver
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Kinlochewe

No Headline

Corporal Donald Maciver was killed on September 21st, 1915. While in the act of retiring from outpost duty he was shot by a sniper, death being instantaneous. One of the crack shots of the Gairloch Company, he held the challenge cup in the year 1912, which entitled him to go to Bisley, but, unfortunately, July being the busy time of the shooting season made it impossible for him to attend. On several occasions he journeyed to the annual shooting meeting at Dingwall and was always successful in the open competitions. As a deer stalker, and in the training and hunting of dogs, he had few equals. He was also a keen angler, and being such an intelligent and energetic gun-room man, made him a distinctive favourite with the shooting tenants and visitors.

Much regret is felt in the whole district at the death of such a promising young man at the early age of 32, and profound sympathy is extended to his parents, brothers and sister.

Photo: #6311

Mackenzie Alexander, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private Alexander Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 08.06.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Cromasaig, Kinlochewe

THE LATE PTE. ALEX. MACKENZIE, SEAFORTHS, KINLOCHEWE

Private Alexander Mackenzie, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mrs Mackenzie, Cromasaig, Kinlochewe. He served for two years in the Lovat Scouts, but was not abroad. He then acted for nine years as assistant gardener under the Messrs Maclennan in the Coulin Gardens, in which capacity he was held in high esteem by the late Sir William Dalgleish, and also by Lady Dalgleish, who sent a sympathetic letter of his mother. He joined the 4th Seaforths in June 1915 and, after training in England, was sent to France, joining a sniping section. He went through a lot of fighting. He was home on furlough in January last; he was in excellent health. On returning to France all went well with him until that memorable morning of the 9th April, when he fell charging the first line of German trenches. Deceased, who was 34 years of age, was a fine specimen of a Highland soldier – sturdy and fearless. He was seen to perform a few heroic deeds before he was knocked out. Quiet and unassuming, he was very popular, his ever ready smile providing a welcome for him no matter where he went. The sympathy of the whole district goes to his mother, sisters, and brothers, who have to mourn the loss of a most dutiful son and brother. Another son of Mrs Mackenzie, Private Charles Mackenzie, is also in the fighting line in France.

A photograph appears today

See entry below for details of his brother Charles Mackenzie

No Photo available

Private Charles Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 08.06.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Charles
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Cromasaig, Kinlochewe

THE LATE PTE. ALEX. MACKENZIE, SEAFORTHS, KINLOCHEWE

Private Alexander Mackenzie, killed in action, was the eldest son of Mrs Mackenzie, Cromasaig, Kinlochewe. He served for two years in the Lovat Scouts, but was not abroad. He then acted for nine years as assistant gardener under the Messrs Maclennan in the Coulin Gardens, in which capacity he was held in high esteem by the late Sir William Dalgleish, and also by Lady Dalgleish, who sent a sympathetic letter of his mother. He joined the 4th Seaforths in June 1915 and, after training in England, was sent to France, joining a sniping section. He went through a lot of fighting. He was home on furlough in January last; he was in excellent health. On returning to France all went well with him until that memorable morning of the 9th April, when he fell charging the first line of German trenches. Deceased, who was 34 years of age, was a fine specimen of a Highland soldier – sturdy and fearless. He was seen to perform a few heroic deeds before he was knocked out. Quiet and unassuming, he was very popular, his ever ready smile providing a welcome for him no matter where he went. The sympathy of the whole district goes to his mother, sisters, and brothers, who have to mourn the loss of a most dutiful son and brother. Another son of Mrs Mackenzie, Private Charles Mackenzie, is also in the fighting line in France.

A photograph appears today

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Mackenzie

Photo: #6585

Mackenzie D W, Corp, Torridon

Corporal D. W. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): D. W.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: Diabeg, Torridon

No Headline

Mr D. W. Mackenzie, who enlisted as a private and became a corporal in the Royal Scots, is a son of Mr A. Mackenzie, Diabeg, Torridon. He has seen active service in France. In civil life he is a schoolmaster.

Photo: #6588

Mackenzie J, Pte, Torridon

Private J. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 28.06.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: Annat, Torridon

TORRIDON GORDON PRISONER OF WAR

Today is reproduced a photo. of Pte. J. Mackenzie, Gordons, formerly Lovat Scouts, son of Mr John Mackenzie, Annat, Torridon, who, as recently reported, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Missing for some time, a comrade wrote home some time ago stating that he saw Pte. Mackenzie made prisoner at the same time as Pte. Allan Strachan, Maryburgh, who served in the same battalion. Pte. Mackenzie had seen much service. Before the war he was employed on the Ardross estate.

A brother, serving in the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and who went out seven months ago, took part in the recent fighting, and was looking for a short spell of leave.

Photo: #6590

Mackenzie John, Pte, Torridon

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 13.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rhicullen, Torridon

TORRIDON SEAFORTH KILLED

Pte. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, whose photo appears today, was reported missing on October 26, 1916, and has now been officially presumed killed in action on that date. The son of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Rhicullen, Torridon, Ross-shire, this fine, sturdy, gallant young soldier joined the 4th Seaforths early in 1916, and soon proceeded to France, where, before being posted missing, he saw much heavy fighting. Before the war Pte. Mackenzie was a gardener with Lady Ogilvie Dalgleish at Coulin.

A brother is serving as a piper with the Scottish Rifles in France.

Photo: #6316

Mackenzie R M, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private R. M. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 10.05.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): R. M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths (Pioneers)
Home Address: Kinlochewe

KINLOCHEWE SEAFORTH WOUNDED

Private R. M. Mackenzie, Seaforths (Pioneers), who is at present in hospital in Norwich, suffering from gunshot wounds in both legs and right forearm, is the youngest son of Mr Peter Mackenzie, Kinlochewe. He is just 19 years of age, and has been in France since last year. A photograph appears today.

Photo: #6313

Maclennan H, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private H. Maclennan

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Maclennan
First Name(s): H.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Greenhill Cottage, Kinlochewe

No Headline

Maclennan, Private H., 1211, D (Gairloch) Coy., killed in action, 11th March 1915, son of Mr and Mrs Maclennan, Greenhill Cottage, Kinlochewe. Barman to trade. His brother, Sergeant John Maclennan, was awarded the DCM for his bravery at Neuve Chapelle.

See entry below for details of his brother John Maclennan

Photo: #6317

Maclennan John, Sgt, Kinlochewe

Sergeant John Maclennan

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Maclennan
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Kinlochewe

THE KINLOCHEWE D.C.M.

Above is given a reproduction of the photograph of Sergeant John Maclennan, D (Gairloch) Company, a native of Kinlochewe. Sergeant Maclennan, who was a Territorial previous to the war, went out with the battalion in November of 1914. In the first battle in which the 1/4th Seaforths took part, Neuve Chapelle, on 11th March, Sergeant Maclennan was awarded the DCM for gallant conduct in the advance to the river Leys, when he removed a wounded non-commissioned officer into cover whilst under very heavy machine gun and rifle fire. In the battle of Aubers Ridge he had the misfortune to be severely wounded, a bullet passing through his eye and breaking the roof of his mouth. He has made a wonderful recovery, and is now doing light duty. On Wednesday, 13th December, 1915, he was publicly presented with his medal by Sir Hector Munro of Foulis, Bart., at a great gathering in Dingwall. The burgh has also presented him with a gold watch in recognition of his bravery. (Photo by Messrs Munro, Dingwall)

See entry above for details of his brother H. Maclennan

Photo: #6314

Watson Jack C, Pte, Kinlochewe

Private Jack C. Watson

Date of Paper: 25.01.1918
Surname: Watson
First Name(s): Jack C.
Rank: Private
Regiment: London Regiment
Home Address: Free Church Manse, Kinlochewe

SON OF KINLOCHEWE MANSE KILLED

Above is reproduced a photograph of Pte. Jack C. Watson, London Regiment, who was killed in action in Palestine on 9th December last. The younger son of the Rev. John Watson, Free Church Manse, Kinlochewe, he was only 22 years of age. Joining up early in the war, he saw much service in France, Macedonia, and Egypt. In pre-war days he was employed with Messrs Duncan & Duncan solicitors, Dingwall and latterly with Mr Robert Munro, Town Chamberlain. He took a keen interest in sport, especially football, and was an energetic and helpful member of the Dingwall Thistle Football Club. Of a bright and loveable disposition, he was a great favourite with all who knew him. His letters home to friends were always written in a cheery, uncomplaining spirit, and his buoyant, optimistic nature rose above all trials and difficulties. “Jacky’s” pleasant smile and welcome greeting will be sadly missed by many friends in Dingwall. Deepest sympathy is felt for the several members of his family in their sore bereavement.