Torridon Calendar 1998

The pictures shown in our calendar were some of those gathered for the Torridon Exhibition held by the school in July 1993. We are grateful to those who took the time to try and identify faces and share their memories. Those who let us share their photographs were –

Sammy Thorburn – Torridon School 1920s, Making the new Annat Road, The Four Daredevils, Keepers Cottage
Katie Mackenzie – The Long and Winding Road to Torridon, Salmon Fishing at Red Point, John ‘Rudd’ Mackenzie
Fraser Mackenzie – His dad’ school photo!
Alistair Maclean – School photo 1936 and the Torridon Football Team
Chrissie Duncan – Willie ‘Diabaig’ at Work, The Torridon Hotel, Transporting Lorry to Alligin
Shena Aanonson – Eliza Macpherson on Croft 21
Peggy Mackenzie – The Annat Shop 18802
Murdo Macdonald – Outdoor Service at Ploc
Nurse Brown – Snow on the Banca Mor

Transporting the first lorry to Alligin

As there was no road to Alligin two boats are tied together with planks laid across for the lorry. We are not sure of all on board but sitting on the lorry bonnet was Johnny Macdonald, Alligin. The man in uniform was Mr Donald Maclean with his son Rory on front. Standing behind him was ‘Funder’ Maclean. Surveying the scene from Corry pier was Dolan’s dog Dileas.

1st lorry to Alligin.jpg

Attribution: unknown

Torridon School 1936

Back row from left to right: Peggy Maclean, Alistair Maclean, Roy Macrae (Corry Pier), Rory Macdonald-Brownhill. Front: Nan Macdonald, Susan Macdonald-Brownhill, Morag Feinty (Gardener’s Cottage). Teacher – Bella Mackenzie

Torridon School 1936
Torridon School 1936

Attribution: unknown

Torridon School in late 1920s

In the 1920s and 30s when these photographs were taken there were also schools in Diabaig and Alligin. However, the Diabaig School was closed in 1957 and Inver-Alligin in 1961 so that by 1963, when our February picture was taken, the children travelled to Torridon daily as they do today.
We hope that you enjoy looking at and using our 1998 calendar.
The mother tongue of the children pictured on the left and the people featured on following pages was the Gaelic, so it seems appropriate to make use of it here too.
Bliadhna Mhath Ur le gach durachd!
Miss Peace with her charges. Standing in rear row are Roddy ‘Dochan’ Macdonald (Fearrach), Donald ‘Moccan’ Mackenzie, Donnie Mackenzie (Bayview).

Torridon School in late 1920s.

Attribution: unknown

Collecting the Torridon mail

The Torridon mail-van backing across the line at Achnasheen Station to pick up goods. The main contractor, Donald Maclean, travelled daily with a horse and trap to Kinlochewe after the First World War. His son Alistair and daughter Peggy now live in Fasaig.

Collecting the Torridon mail.

Attribution: unknown

Torridon School late 1960s

Back row l-r: Iain (Happy) Maclennan, Murdo Macdonald (Bella Vista), Ritchie Tough, Murdo Mackenzie (Bayview), Donnie Macdonald. Middle row: Donnie Beaton, Murdo Alick Mackenzie, Willie Tough, Murdo Beaton, Murdo ‘Corry’ Macdonald. Front row: Eleanor Beaton, Linda Low, Anne Macdonald, Jane Mackenzie, Catherine Tough.

Torridon School late 1960s.

Attribution: unknown

The Annat shop

Mr Donald Mackenzie pictured by his shop in Annat in the 1880s. The shop was opened to cater for the men working at nearby Ben Damph house and sold a great variety of goods ranging from men’s boots to the sickles and crooks seen at the upstairs window and the clay pipes below. The room on the left was used as an office. The shop was run until recent years by Mr Mackenzie’s son Donnie.

The Annat shop

Attribution: unknown

Mr Macdonald ('Willie Diabaig')

Mr Macdonald (‘Willie Diabaig’) pictured at work lobster fishing aboard the Hilda. Willie was renowned for his sense of humour and his great ability to recount stories from the past.

Mr Macdonald ('Willie Diabaig')

Attribution: unknown

Am Ploc

Villagers gathered at Ploc for an outdoor service taken by Rev Peter Findlay. Among those braving the midges were Morag and Joan Macdonald, Katherine and Alice, Bayview, and Mary Macdonald who is in the foreground. It is not known if this historic site was an outdoor church or an early parliament where community decisions were made. Although it is possible to walk to the site, sadly the outer wall is now collapsing, allowing seaweed and bracken to cover the rows of stone.

Outdoor service at Am Ploc

Attribution: unknown

Salmon fishing at Red Point late 1940s.

Pictured at the Salmon Fishing Station off Red Point are local men: l-r: Murdo Mackenzie, Diabaig; Kenny Macrae, Red Point; Donald ‘Rupert’ Mackenzie, Opinan; Ali ‘Corry’ Macpherson, John Macpherson, George Warren, and Sandy Mackenzie, Diabaig.

Salmon fishing at Red Point late 1940s.

Attribution: unknown

Making the new road at Annat

When the bridge at Balgy was replaced, finally enabling cars to travel from Torridon to Shieldaig, the road at Annat was widened to double track. Hard at work in 1963 is Raymond MacAllister, Beauly.

Making the new road at Annat.

Attribution: unknown

The handsome lads of Torridon football team in the 1930s.

Back row l-r: Finlay Maclean, Donald ‘Moccan’ Mackenzie, Duncan ‘Willigin’ Maclean.
Middle row l-r: Kenny Macdonald, Alligin; Donald ‘Diamond’ Mackenzie, Angus Mackenzie, Durrie. Front row l-r: Murdo Dolan; George Mackenzie, Barnfield; Murdo Mackenzie, Annat Lodge; Donnie Mackenzie, Barnfield; Willie Maclean, Fasaig.

Football Team

Attribution: unknown

gathering the hay

Eliza Macpherson gathering the hay on Croft 21, Diabaig.

Gathering Hay

Attribution: unknown

Loch Torridon hotel

Originally built in 1887 as a private residence this majestic building was converted to a hotel in 1962. An artist was brought over from Florence to work on the interior including laying the impressive mosaic at the entrance. Local schoolchildren were able to mark time by the sound of the clock bells chiming across the loch. Tariff for a room with private bathroom would set you back £3 and dogs were permitted in the owners’ bedrooms for 2s/6d.

Sport included Salmon and Sea Trout fishing from hotel motor boats, Sailing, Riding and Stalking which cost £10 per day. Fishing charges varied from £1 on Loch Damph to £5 on River Balgy – a ghillie for the day was £1.50.

Loch Torridon hotel

Attribution: unknown

The four daredevils

James Thorburn (2nd from left) with three friends (all also named Jimmy) at Ripon Training Camp in 1917, six weeks before leaving for France.

As his mother had recently died Jimmy was allowed to cover the second button on his tunic in black cloth. Aged 17, Jimmy had joined up two years earlier after lying about his age to get into the army. He lost the finger on his right hand due to an accident with a handgun in Glasgow but was sadly later to lose his right arm in the Battle of the Somme.

The four daredevils

Attribution: unknown

Banca Mor

A winter walk on the Banca Mor.

Winter Walk on the Banca Mor

Attribution: unknown

Digging through Snow Drifts

Having no snowploughs, it could take up to a week to dig through the snow drifts to reach Fasaig from Diabaig.

Digging through  Snow Drifts

Attribution: unknown

Keeper's Cottage, Corry

Pictured from l-r: ? ; Duncan MacBeath (‘The Gillie Ban’); Cathy; Donnie and Mary Macdonald (Donnie London’s father and aunts); Murachadh Ban; John Macgregor; Roderick Maclean (‘Rory Dubh’). Centre front: William Macdonald, Old Inn (Keeper); MacDuff’s grandfather; Betty Macdonald and mother Bessie.

Keeper's Cottage, Corry

Attribution: unknown

John 'Rudd' Mackenzie

John ‘Rudd’ Mackenzie.

John 'Rudd' Mackenzie.

Attribution: unknown

The long and winding road to Torridon

The long and winding road to Torridon.

The long and winding road to Torridon.

Attribution: unknown