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Private Colin Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 06.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Colin
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: North Strome, Ross-shire

THE LATE PTE. ROD. MACKENZIE, NORTH STROME

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Private Roderick Mackenzie, Black Watch, son of Widow Mackenzie, North Strome, who was killed in action in the recent offensive. News of his death has occasioned much regret in a district where he was well-known and greatly respected. When war broke out deceased was engaged in the West of Scotland. He joined up early – one of Kitchener’s Army – and went to France in July 1915, in time to share in the first great battles when the New Army was tested and not found wanting as, for example, at Loos. Subsequently he fought in many battles, shared fully in the monotonous and often perilous work of trench warfare, escaping without a scratch until July 23rd last, when he was killed as stated. Widow Mackenzie had in all three sons serving. This is the second loss she has sustained, which makes heavier the present blow and the deeper public sympathy.

Pte. Colin Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 2nd June 1915, served six years with the regular army in India. He is well remembered on the West Coast, having before joining up been employed on the Strome section of the Highland Railway.

The surviving soldier son is Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was a shepherd in America when war broke out, and came over about two years ago to do his bit. He was wounded last year.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Private Kenneth Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 06.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: North Strome, Ross-shire

THE LATE PTE. ROD. MACKENZIE, NORTH STROME

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Private Roderick Mackenzie, Black Watch, son of Widow Mackenzie, North Strome, who was killed in action in the recent offensive. News of his death has occasioned much regret in a district where he was well-known and greatly respected. When war broke out deceased was engaged in the West of Scotland. He joined up early – one of Kitchener’s Army – and went to France in July 1915, in time to share in the first great battles when the New Army was tested and not found wanting as, for example, at Loos. Subsequently he fought in many battles, shared fully in the monotonous and often perilous work of trench warfare, escaping without a scratch until July 23rd last, when he was killed as stated. Widow Mackenzie had in all three sons serving. This is the second loss she has sustained, which makes heavier the present blow and the deeper public sympathy.

Pte. Colin Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 2nd June 1915, served six years with the regular army in India. He is well remembered on the West Coast, having before joining up been employed on the Strome section of the Highland Railway.

The surviving soldier son is Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was a shepherd in America when war broke out, and came over about two years ago to do his bit. He was wounded last year.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6539

Mackenzie Roderick, Pte, North Stome

Private Roderick Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 06.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Black Watch
Home Address: North Strome, Ross-shire

THE LATE PTE. ROD. MACKENZIE, NORTH STROME

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Private Roderick Mackenzie, Black Watch, son of Widow Mackenzie, North Strome, who was killed in action in the recent offensive. News of his death has occasioned much regret in a district where he was well-known and greatly respected. When war broke out deceased was engaged in the West of Scotland. He joined up early – one of Kitchener’s Army – and went to France in July 1915, in time to share in the first great battles when the New Army was tested and not found wanting as, for example, at Loos. Subsequently he fought in many battles, shared fully in the monotonous and often perilous work of trench warfare, escaping without a scratch until July 23rd last, when he was killed as stated. Widow Mackenzie had in all three sons serving. This is the second loss she has sustained, which makes heavier the present blow and the deeper public sympathy.

Pte. Colin Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 2nd June 1915, served six years with the regular army in India. He is well remembered on the West Coast, having before joining up been employed on the Strome section of the Highland Railway.

The surviving soldier son is Pte. Kenneth Mackenzie, Seaforths, who was a shepherd in America when war broke out, and came over about two years ago to do his bit. He was wounded last year.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6331

Mackenzie Donald, L Corp, Lochcarron

Lance Corporal Donald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 06.12.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 5th Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Ardineaskan, Lochcarron

THE LATE L/CPL D. MACKENZIE, D.C.M., LOCHCARRON

25499 Lce./Cpl. Donald Mackenzie, D.C.M., 5th Cameron Highlanders, Ardineaskan, Lochcarron, was killed in action on the 21st October. The fourth son of the late Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Ardineaskan, he joined up early in the war at the Cameron Barracks, Inverness, at the age of 16 years, giving his age as 18 years, and as he was a tall and strong fellow, he looked it. Many brave, nobly inspired boys guiltlessly did the same. He went to France when 17, and was wounded three times during a short period in France. A fine type of a Highland soldier, he was at once brave and fearless. The “Lochcarron Hero” was how he was spoken of by the men of his platoon. His bravery on the battlefield was common talk. One night he was missing, but he returned to the trenches in the morning covered with blood. He had spent the night carrying wounded out of the bullet swept zone of the battlefield to a place of safety. A loving brother, well liked and highly respected by everyone who knew him, no more willing lad could be found.

His loss is sincerely mourned by his relatives and a wide circle of friends, and there is much sympathy with his only sister and his four brothers. The latter have been all on active service. Roderick and Kennie are in the R.N.R. Before joining up they were employed on a motor fishing boat. John and Kenneth joined the American Army, and are on service in France. They were shepherds in the mountains of America pre-war days. A photo. of L./Cpl. Donald Mackenzie appears today.

Photo: #6499

Corp, Mackenzie John, Strathcarron

Photo: #6500

Corp, Mackenzie John, Strathcarron

Corporal John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Railway Cottages, Attadale, Strathcarron

MILITARY MEDAL TO ATTADALE SOLDIER

The photograph is reproduced today of Corpl. John Mackenzie, Seaforths, who has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on 23rd and 24th April, 1917. Corpl. Mackenzie is the second son of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Railway Cottages, Attadale, Strathcarron. Enlisting in June 1915, he went to France in October of the same year, and has been continuously with the county battalion since, except when on a few days leave in January last. A fine, young soldier, Strathcarron is proud of his distinction.


In the Ross-shire Journal of 8 November 2013 Lynne Bradshaw has written further about the War Service of Corporal John Mackenzie and the article is reproduced by kind permission of the author and the Editor:

“One of the bravest men in France” and “the finest soldier the British Army could have had” were the glowing terms Seaforth Highlander officers used to describe 20-year-old Corporal John Mackenzie of Strathcarron.

Tragically, the warm commendations for the decorated young soldier were written in poignant heartfelt letters to his parents 96 years ago telling them of the circumstances of his death.
Corporal Mackenzie was killed in France during World War I by a German shell just four months after he was awarded the military medal for gallantry in the field and a few weeks after he had been home on leave.

Sadly, his medal was lost over the years as the grieving family he left behind moved from house to house, but the letters paying tribute to the “bold, fearless, inspiring” soldier are now treasured by his nieces and nephews, his closest surviving relatives.

Nephew Kenny Macpherson of Poolewe and the wider family have decided, in the run-up to Remembrance Sunday, to share the letters written by a captain and lieutenant about the “fine strapping soldier and typical Highlander” as a timely memorial to the Wester Ross lad who never returned home.

John, who had two brothers and three sisters, was the second son of Kenneth and Marion Mackenzie of Railway Cottages, Attadale. He enlisted in June 1915 at the age of 18 and joined the fourth battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders.

He went to France in October that year and was in charge of a bombing section. John, known as Jock to his platoon, was awarded the military medal for his efforts in securing a bomb factory in the Arras Sector in France in April 1917.

John, who is said to have had a bright and cheerful disposition and was a “great favourite to all”, was killed about 8pm on August 1, 1917.

The company had just arrived to a new position and were busy “digging in”. John, a Sergeant Fraser and a few others of No. 9 Platoon were consolidating a shell hole when a German 5.9 shell landed right among them. John and Sergeant Fraser were killed and several others were badly wounded.
Lieutenant John N Macdonald, of 3 Company, wrote to the family informing them of his loss, the night after John’s death. “I cannot tell you how sorry I feel at his death, and how I sympathise with you in your loss of such a son. Jock was to us the finest type of soldier, bold, fearless, inspiring all his comrades to do gallant deeds which were only natural to him, He was in charge of the bombing section and I can tell you I have no NCO I respected and trusted more than I did your son. His loss will be a big blank in the platoon. The bombers will miss their bold, intrepid leader sorely. He was always ready to cheer and encourage them when everything seemed dark, and they were weary with the water and the mud. His cheety smile and genial atmosphere was enough to dissipate everything that seemed disheartening, and they were ready to follow him in everything that had to be done.”
The letter went on to say that now they are without him, they in the platoon who miss him so much can only extend their most heartfelt sympathy to his sorrowing parents.

“We know the blank there will be in your household, and while we sorrow with you in your sorrow, we are proud, as you are proud, of having had with us the finest soldier the British Army could have had. You have truly given of your best for your country.”

The officer commanding the company, Captain Angus Macdons, later wrote to John’s parents explaining John and Sergeant Fraser were “killed instantaneously and could not have had a second of pain”. He wrote: “I write to express for myself and the officers, NCOs and men of my company, how fearfully sorry we all are to have lost your son. We extend to you and all of his friends our heartfelt sympathy. We are all convinced that he was one of the bravest men in France and one of the mainstays of my company. In your time of trouble, remember those points and be proud that your son left such a wonderful example of bravery and manliness for us to try and follow. He is buried alongside Sergeant Fraser just where he fell behind the German lines. We erected the best form of cross we could and registered the grave.”

John was laid to rest in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission burial ground for the dead of World War I in Ieper, formerly known as Ypres, in Belgium. Thirteen years ago Kenny was the first member of his family to visit it.

John’s last surviving sibling Christine – the youngest of six and the mother of Kenny Macpherson – died in 1990.

Photo: #6306

Mackenzie John, Pte, Killilan

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 20.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Iron Lodge, Killilan, Kyle

KILLILAN SEAFORTH DIES OF WOUNDS

A photo appears today of a fine Seaforth Territorial, 242267 Pte. John Mackenzie, son of Mrs B. Mackenzie, Iron Lodge, Killilan, by Kyle, who died in France on 23rd July last, of wounds received in action.

In a letter to the mother, 2/Lt. J. Morrison says: “Dear Mrs Mackenzie, – I am sorry to inform you that your son, 242267 Pte. J. Mackenzie was wounded on the 23rd July. He was taken down to hospital, and I lost trace of him then as I went into hospital myself very shortly afterwards. On coming out I immediately made inquiries, and I deeply regret I was informed that he died on the same date as he was wounded. I might add that first of all everybody thought that he would recover, and everything possible was done. But, unfortunately, it had to be. Everybody who knew your son here deeply regrets his death, as he was a favourite with them all. His unassuming manner and his very keen intelligence placed him in a department a long way above the average, and his loss to the regiment is keenly felt in every sense of the word. I was his platoon officer, and he was my batman, and he was the best friend I had in France. Both of us belong to the Gaelic-speaking Highlands.”

Photo: #6318

Mackenzie R, CSM, Kishorn

Company Sergeant Major R. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 12.04.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): R.
Rank: Company Sergeant Major
Regiment: Australian Infantry
Home Address: Kishorn, Lochcarron

1980 Sergt. R. Mackenzie, Australian Infantry, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was responsible for the capture of several shell-hole positions, displaying courage and leadership of the highest order. During the consolidation he showed absolute disregard for personal safety, rendering great assistance in laying out and constructing defences. He also gained much and valuable information when in charge of patrols, during which he carried in many wounded under heavy machine gun and rifle fire. His splendid example did much to keep up the morale of his men.

Date of Paper: 10.05.1918

ROSS-SHIRE ANZAC D.C.M.

1980 Company Sergt.-Major R. Mackenzie, Australian Infantry, whose photo appears today, has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was responsible for the capture of several shell-hole positions, displaying courage and leadership of the highest order. During the consolidation he showed absolute disregard for personal safety, rendering great assistance in laying out and constructing defences. He also gained much valuable information when in charge of patrols, during which he carried in many wounded under heavy machine gun and rifle fire. His splendid example did much to keep up the morale of his men. Sergt. Mackenzie is a native of Kishorn, Lochcarron, and has one brother serving in the A.I.F., one in the Navy, while another is a prisoner of war in Germany. Sergt. Mackenzie went abroad five years before war. He joined up in 1915, has been through Gallipoli, and is now in France. After being awarded the D.C.M. he was promoted to be Company Sergeant Major.

Photo: #6307

Mackenzie William R, Pte, Killilan

Private William R. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.11.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): William R.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Killilan, Ross-shire

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Killilan, lately received the very sad news of the death of their only son, Pte. William R. Mackenzie, Seaforths (Service), at the age of 23 years. Pte Mackenzie was in the great advance on the 12th October, when he was struck by flying metal from a bursting shell, death being instantaneous. Prior to the war Pte. Mackenzie was a gardener at Achnashellach, and voluntarily enlisted to do his bit for his country. He was of an exceedingly gentlemanly nature. An ever cheery disposition won him the friendship and goodwill of all his acquaintances, and all speak in the highest terms of him. The sad news has come as a severe blow to his bereaved parents and sisters, and in their very sore trial the sympathy of many friends has been shown by numerous letters of condolence from many quarters. Pte. Mackenzie was a great favourite throughout the surrounding parishes and won for himself the high respect of all who knew him. He did his duty willingly and cheerfully, and while many mourn, all will long remember that he made the supreme sacrifice for “the ashes of his fathers and the temples of his gods”. Captain Barrington Anderson, M.C., in a letter to the parents, says: “It is with the greatest regret that I am writing you of the death in action of your son, Private W. R. Mackenzie, of my company. He was killed during an attack made on the 12th October. He was struck by flying metal from a bursting shell, death being instantaneous. Your son was an excellent soldier, and one we all had a great respect for. His ever cheery disposition won him the goodwill of all his comrades in the line, and we will all miss him very much. I fully understand what this sad news must mean to you and his mother, who loved him so much, more than all others, and send you my sincere sympathy.”

Photo: #5795

Maclean Duncan, Pte, Achnashellach

Private Duncan Maclean

Date of Paper: .09.15.1919
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Gate House, Balnacra, Achnashellach

A MISSING ROSS-SHIRE 2ND SEAFORTH

Reproduced above is a photograph of Pte. Duncan Maclean, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, who was reported wounded and missing on the 12th October, 1917, at Passchendale Ridge. Since then he has been presumed killed on that date. Previous to joining up in 1916, Pte Maclean was employed with Mr Paris as mail driver between Strathcarron and Sheildaig, where he was well liked by all who knew him. He went through and operation for appendicitis in the Ross Memorial Hospital, Dingwall, in 1914, which kept him from going East with the Ross Mountain Battery, of which unit he was a member before the war. He joined the 2nd Seaforths in France in 1916, and was invalided home with trench feet the same winter. He went out again to the 7th Seaforths in May, 1917.
Any information about him will be gladly received by his father and mother, who reside at the Gate House, Balnacra, Achnashellach, Ross-shire.

Photo: #6451

Macrae Christopher, L Corp, Plockton

Lance Corporal Christopher Macrae

Paper: 06.10.1916
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Christopher
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 15, Harbour Street, Plockton

No Headline

Lance Corporal Christopher Macrae was the only son of Mr Christopher Macrae, 15 Harbour Street, Plockton. He was serving in the Argyle Street Branch of the Commercial Bank, Glasgow. Though of a somewhat delicate frame, he felt it his duty to join those who defended their country, and chose the Seaforths. Having been training for three months he was sent with a company of his battalion to Mesopotamia, where, after being a few times in the trenches, he died of dysentery on the 9th August.

Portraits of both* these young men appear today.

*No indication who the other person is.

Photo: #6538

Macrae Donald J, Pte, Stromeferry

Private Donald J. Macrae

Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Donald J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: American Infantry
Home Address: Fernaig Shore, Stromeferry

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late L./Corpl. William Macrae, Seaforths (Regulars), who was killed in action during severe fighting on the Western Front of October 4, 1917. Before enlisting, deceased, who was 30 years of age, was employed on the Highland Railway at Achnasheen. A native of Stromeferry, he was of a quiet disposition, and held in much esteem by all who knew him. His death will be much regretted in the West.

A brother, Mr Donald Macrae, resides at Old Kilpatrick.

Paper: 24.03.1919

THREE STROMEFERRY HEROES

Reproduced today are the photographs of three members of a well-known Stromeferry family, who have made the supreme sacrifice in the war.
Lance Corporal William Macrae, 2nd Seaforths, was killed in action during the severe fighting on the Western Front on October 4th, 1917. Before enlisting in the Regulars, deceased, who was 30 years of age, was employed on the Highland Railway at Achnasheen.
Private Donald J. Macrae was a unit of the American Infantry. He was killed in action on 6th October 1918, just one year after his brother, William.

Both were sons of the late Mr Duncan Macrae, Fernaig Shore, Stromeferry, and brothers of Mrs C. J. Mackay, Shore, Stromeferry.

The third member of the family to fall was Sapper Donald Ross Mackay, eldest son of Mrs Mackay, and the late Mr George Mackay, Portaskaig Hotel, Islay. Sapper Mackay was in the Royal Engineers, and he died of wounds at 25th Casualty Clearing Station, Salonica, on 28th November, 1918. Quite a young boy, he joined the forces in the spring of 1915.

See entry below for details of his brother William Macrae

Photo: #6537

Macrae William, L Corp, Stromeferry

Lance Corporal William Macrae

Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 2nd Seaforths
Home Address: Fernaig Shore, Stromeferry

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late L./Corpl. William Macrae, Seaforths (Regulars), who was killed in action during severe fighting on the Western Front of October 4, 1917. Before enlisting, deceased, who was 30 years of age, was employed on the Highland Railway at Achnasheen. A native of Stromeferry, he was of a quiet disposition, and held in much esteem by all who knew him. His death will be much regretted in the West.

A brother, Mr Donald Macrae, resides at Old Kilpatrick.

Paper: 24.03.1919

THREE STROMEFERRY HEROES

Reproduced today are the photographs of three members of a well-known Stromeferry family, who have made the supreme sacrifice in the war.
Lance Corporal William Macrae, 2nd Seaforths, was killed in action during the severe fighting on the Western Front on October 4th, 1917. Before enlisting in the Regulars, deceased, who was 30 years of age, was employed on the Highland Railway at Achnasheen.
Private Donald J. Macrae was a unit of the American Infantry. He was killed in action on 6th October 1918, just one year after his brother, William.

Both were sons of the late Mr Duncan Macrae, Fernaig Shore, Stromeferry, and brothers of Mrs C. J. Mackay, Shore, Stromeferry.

The third member of the family to fall was Sapper Donald Ross Mackay, eldest son of Mrs Mackay, and the late Mr George Mackay, Portaskaig Hotel, Islay. Sapper Mackay was in the Royal Engineers, and he died of wounds at 25th Casualty Clearing Station, Salonica, on 28th November, 1918. Quite a young boy, he joined the forces in the spring of 1915.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Macrae

Photo: #6333

Macrae Murdo, L Corp, Lochcarron

Lance Corporal Murdo Macrae

Paper: 08.11.1918
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Gordon Highlanders
Home Address: Grove Cottage, Lochcarron

No Headline

Previously reported wounded, Lce.-Cpl. Murdo Macrae, Gordon Highlanders, has now been reported killed in action on August 23rd, 1918. The second youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Macrae, Grove Cottage, Lochcarron, deceased, whose photograph appears today, was just in his 20th year. The Chaplain of his regiment, the Rev. D. Conacher, writes to the mother: “I am very sorry indeed to have to inform you that your son was killed in action on the date on which he was reported to us as wounded. I do not know how the error arose, except that we are in the midst of terrible fighting, and living with overburdened minds at very great pressure. I grieve exceedingly for you in your anxiety, especially now that the news which I send you is the worst. Your son is one of many who have given their lives in this war, but that does not lessen your grief, for the sharp blow comes now to your heart and home. Your son lived his life as a young man and performed his duty as a soldier in a manner of which you might well be proud. He received promotion and well he earned it, for he was active and eager and efficient in the service. He was cool and courageous in the face of danger, and out at rest he was willing and capable for all that was asked of him. He possessed the high opinion and goodwill of his officers, and no less was he esteemed by his comrades. One and all had the kindly thought and word of him. We sympathise with you deeply in your sorrow.”

L-Cpl. Macrae had been on active service on the Western Front for over a year, and had shared in many battles, taking part in the strenuous offensive in the autumn of last year, helping repel the German onrush in the spring of this year and sharing in the more heartening, if strenuous, victorious push which followed the defeat of the German plans. He was a very fine manly lad, a great favourite in the district, and well beloved at home. Deep sympathy is felt with the parents and family. Deceased was a gardener at Achnashellach when he joined up.

Mr and Mrs Macrae have given other three sons to the Army. Two are still serving, and one who came over from New Zealand with the Expeditionary Force, was wounded at the Dardanelles, is now discharged, and has returned to New Zealand.

Photo: #5794

Michie David, Pte, Achnashellach

Private David Michie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Michie
First Name(s): David
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealand Infantry
Home Address: Achashellach

ACHNASHELLACH NEW ZEALANDER WOUNDED

Private David Michie, New Zealand Infantry, who was wounded in action on 4th June, is a son of the late Mr Alex. Michie, who for over 40 years was head gamekeeper at Achnashellach. Pte. Michie served under Botha in South Africa, and afterwards went to New Zealand, where, for the second time, he answered the call and came to France with a contingent in 1916.

His brother, William, who came over with the Australian Infantry made the supreme sacrifice at the Gallipoli landing.
Another brother, Donald who was wounded in the beginning of the war, whilst serving with General Botha, has now recovcred, and is fighting in East Africa.

A photograph of Pte. D. Michie appears to-day.

Photo: #6338

Michie J, Sgt, Lochcarron

Sergeant J. Michie

Date of Paper: 25.05.1917
Surname: Michie
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Lochcarron

THE LATE SGT. MICHIE, LOCHCARRON

Deep reget has been caused in Lochcarron by the death in action of 11158 Sergeant J. Michie, H.L.I., who was killed in action on the 9th April. He was a gallant soldier, and well liked by young and old who knew him. He joined the Regulars 9 years ago, and three of those he served as drill instructor. He was wounded in the early days of the war. Getting a short leave in February of this year from Edinburgh, where he was drill instructor for some time, he visited his parents, but little did they think it would be his last visit to see them. He was a dutiful son, and will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him. Much sympathy is extended to the parents in their great loss.

A photograph apears to-day.

Photo: #6334

Murchison Murdoch, Lieut, Lochcarron

Lieutenant Murdoch Murchison

Date of Paper: 28.06.1918
Surname: Murchison
First Name(s): Murdoch
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Royal Naval Reserve
Home Address: Edinburgh (formerly Auchintraid, Kishorn, Lochcarron)

A GALLANT LOCHCARRON OFFICER

The photo is reproduced today of Lt. Murdoch Murchison, R.N.R., son of Mrs Murchison, Auchintraid, Kishorn, Lochcarron, who has received the D.S.C. for action against the enemy at sea. Prior to the war Lieut. Murchison was a captain in the Mercantile Marine.
Mrs Murchison, his wife, who is an Australian lady, and child, at present reside in Edinburgh. Lieut. Murchison was decorated by the King in London last month.

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