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Photo: #6452

Campbell Donald, Pte, Edinburgh Ex Plockton

Private Donald Campbell

Date of Paper: 06.10.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: 5, Argyle Park Terrace, Edinburgh.

No Headline

Pte. Donald Campbell, who was brought up by his grandmother, Mrs Macrae, Bank St., Plockton, and whose mother resides with her family at 5 Argyle Park Terrace, Edinburgh, was the son of Mr R. J. Campbell, late of the General Post-Office, Edinburgh. He was in the Rural Workers’ Insurance Office, Edinburgh, when he joined the Royal Scots. He took cheerfully to the great task of defending his country. He was killed in action in France on the 3rd August. His brother William, is also with the Forces.

Photo: #6213

Campbell John M, Pte, Glenshiel

Private John Millar

Date of Paper: 02.02.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): John Millar
Rank: Private
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders (Lovat Scouts)
Home Address: Glenshiel

THE LATE PTE. J. M. CAMPBELL, GLENSHIEL

Pte. John Millar Campbell, Cameron Highlanders (Lovat Scouts), killed in France on 10th January, was the eldest son of Mr Colin Campbell, estate manager, Glenshiel. His company officer communicated the intelligence to his parents in very sympathetic terms, assuring them the remains were interred close behind the front line with all the ceremonial due to a British hero so far as the circumstances would permit. He was a most lovable young man, a favourite with all, a whole-hearted patriotic Highland soldier, and his death has touched the hearts of young and old in the district. He joined the Lovat Scouts when he was 17 years of age, and saw service with them in Gallipoli, where he came through many hairbreadth dangers. A younger brother is with the Inverness R.H.A., presently in Egypt.

A photograph of Pte. Campbell appears above.

Photo: #6319

Finlayson Donald, Pte, Kishorn

Private Donald Finlayson

Date of Paper: 26.07.1918
Surname: Finlayson
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

KISHORN SEAFORTH'S DEATH

Pte. Donald Finlayson, Seaforths, who died at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, on 23rd June, 1918, from wounds received in action was the third son of the late Mr Malcolm Finlayson and Mrs Finlayson, Seafield Farm, Kishorn, Strathcarron. Twenty-eight years of age, before the war he was employed on Lochcarron estate, and was a member of Ross Mountain Battery, with which he mobilised at the outbreak of war. Time-expired two years ago, he rejoined for the duration of the war, but transferred to the 4th Seaforths, with which battalion he was trained in Scotland and at Ripon. He proceeded to France to be wounded very soon after, and was invalided home. He returned to the line again in 1917, in time to share in the battle of Arras in April,1917, and again severely wounded, he was invalided home.

In March last he returned to the Western Front for the third time, and shared in the great defensive actions. Mortally wounded on 22nd June, he passed away as stated, on 23rd June. Deceased has left behind him very pleasant memories. A happy, joyous, obliging lad, when he reached man’s estate he maintained the respect and esteem of all, and, besides his widowed mother and brothers and sisters, he leaves many friends who sincerely mourn his loss, and who will long recall the place he filled in the life of the district in those far off days of peace, and the nobility of his end.

Two brothers are serving with the Forces. Gunner M. A. Finlayson is in the New Zealand Field Artillery, and Corporal J. Finlayson is in the United States Signal Corps. in France.
A photo. of Private D. Finlayson appears in to-day’s paper.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Corporal J. Finlayson

Date of Paper: 26.07.1918
Surname: Finlayson
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: United States Signal Corps
Home Address: Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

KISHORN SEAFORTH'S DEATH

Pte. Donald Finlayson, Seaforths, who died at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, on 23rd June, 1918, from wounds received in action was the third son of the late Mr Malcolm Finlayson and Mrs Finlayson, Seafield Farm, Kishorn, Strathcarron. Twenty-eight years of age, before the war he was employed on Lochcarron estate, and was a member of Ross Mountain Battery, with which he mobilised at the outbreak of war. Time-expired two years ago, he rejoined for the duration of the war, but transferred to the 4th Seaforths, with which battalion he was trained in Scotland and at Ripon. He proceeded to France to be wounded very soon after, and was invalided home. He returned to the line again in 1917, in time to share in the battle of Arras in April,1917, and again severely wounded, he was invalided home.

In March last he returned to the Western Front for the third time, and shared in the great defensive actions. Mortally wounded on 22nd June, he passed away as stated, on 23rd June. Deceased has left behind him very pleasant memories. A happy, joyous, obliging lad, when he reached man’s estate he maintained the respect and esteem of all, and, besides his widowed mother and brothers and sisters, he leaves many friends who sincerely mourn his loss, and who will long recall the place he filled in the life of the district in those far off days of peace, and the nobility of his end.

Two brothers are serving with the Forces. Gunner M. A. Finlayson is in the New Zealand Field Artillery, and Corporal J. Finlayson is in the United States Signal Corps. in France.

A photo. of Private D. Finlayson appears in to-day’s paper.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Gunner M. A. Finlayson

Date of Paper: 26.07.1918
Surname: Finlayson
First Name(s): M. A.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: New Zealand Field Artillery
Home Address: Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

KISHORN SEAFORTH'S DEATH

Pte. Donald Finlayson, Seaforths, who died at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, on 23rd June, 1918, from wounds received in action was the third son of the late Mr Malcolm Finlayson and Mrs Finlayson, Seafield Farm, Kishorn, Strathcarron. Twenty-eight years of age, before the war he was employed on Lochcarron estate, and was a member of Ross Mountain Battery, with which he mobilised at the outbreak of war. Time-expired two years ago, he rejoined for the duration of the war, but transferred to the 4th Seaforths, with which battalion he was trained in Scotland and at Ripon. He proceeded to France to be wounded very soon after, and was invalided home. He returned to the line again in 1917, in time to share in the battle of Arras in April,1917, and again severely wounded, he was invalided home.

In March last he returned to the Western Front for the third time, and shared in the great defensive actions. Mortally wounded on 22nd June, he passed away as stated, on 23rd June. Deceased has left behind him very pleasant memories. A happy, joyous, obliging lad, when he reached man’s estate he maintained the respect and esteem of all, and, besides his widowed mother and brothers and sisters, he leaves many friends who sincerely mourn his loss, and who will long recall the place he filled in the life of the district in those far off days of peace, and the nobility of his end.

Two brothers are serving with the Forces. Gunner M. A. Finlayson is in the New Zealand Field Artillery, and Corporal J. Finlayson is in the United States Signal Corps. in France.
A photo. of Private D. Finlayson appears in to-day’s paper.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6320

Finlayson William, Sgt, Kishorn

Lance Sergeant William Finlayson

Date of Paper: 18.08.1916
Surname: Finlayson
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance-Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ardarroch, Kishorn.

THE LATE LCE.-SERGT. W. FINLAYSON

Above we reproduce the portrait of Lance-Sergt. Wm. Finlayson, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 26th July.

A son of Mr and Mrs Wm. Finlayson, Ardarroch, Kishorn, Sergt. Finlayson enlisted in December, 1914, shortly after his brother, Sergt. M. Finlayson, 2nd Seaforths, had been killed in action. After four months’ training at Bedford, including three weeks at Chesea School of Instruction, he proceeded to France with the second draft in April, 1915. He was present in the trenches at Aubers Ridge on May 9th, and had been on the Western front ever since, except for ten days’ leave at home in January last. He received his sergeant’s stripes after a course of instruction in bomb-throwing, etc., in France, having previously given up his corporal stripes in order to get to the front.
He was 26 years of age.

Photo: #6329

Fraser T, Gunner, Lochcarron

Gunner T. Fraser

Date of Paper: 24.12.1915
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): T.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Tullich, Lochcarron

No Headline

4189 Gunner T. Fraser, Ross Mountain Battery, who died at Malta on the 25th November, was a member of the Ross Mountain Battery at the time of his mobilisation. He served since with his Battery, leaving Bedford with the first contingent. In private life he was a farm hand on the Tullich farm.

He leaves a widow Mrs Fraser, Tullich, Lochcarron and four children. The oldest child is ten years and the youngest two years.

Photo: #6328

Kennedy Alexander, Gunner, Lochcarron

Gunner Alexander Kennedy

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Field Artillery
Home Address: Lochcarron

No Headline

True patriotism overcomes all selfishness, and whatever sacrifice it may involve. This was shown by 104984 Gunner Alexander Kennedy, Royal Field Artillery (the figure at the top), son of the late Mr Duncan Kennedy, Lochcarron, who in last August came all the way from Argentine Republic to enlist, and is now undergoing the necessary training in the R.F.A. at Salisbury plain. He was employed in Santa Cruz Territory by a well-known sheep farming company, where he was getting on prosperously.

Another of the family is Lance-Corporal John Kennedy, E. Coy., 3rd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. Prior to enlistment he was in the Edinburgh Police Force.
The Lochcarron district has reason to be proud of the manner in which its young men have responded to the Nation’s call.

See entry below for details of his brother John Kennedy

Photo: #6332

Kennedy John, L Corp, Lochcarron

Lance Corporal John Kennedy

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): John
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 3rd Seaforths
Home Address: Lochcarron

True patriotism overcomes all selfishness, and whatever sacrifice it may involve. This was shown by 104984 Gunner Alexander Kennedy, Royal Field Artillery (the figure at the top), son of the late Mr Duncan Kennedy, Lochcarron, who in last August came all the way from Argentine Republic to enlist, and is now undergoing the necessary training in the R.F.A. at Salisbury plain. He was employed in Santa Cruz Territory by a well-known sheep farming company, where he was getting on prosperously.

Another of the family is Lance-Corporal John Kennedy, E. Coy., 3rd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. Prior to enlistment he was in the Edinburgh Police Force.
The Lochcarron district has reason to be proud of the manner in which its young men have responded to the Nation’s call.

Date of Paper: 23.06.1916

THE LATE LANCE-CORPL. J. KENNEDY

8871 Lance-Corporal John Kennedy, 3rd Seaforths, a native of Lochcarron, whose death we chronicled in our issue of last week, was, prior to the war, for some years in the city of Edinburgh police force. He was discharged from the army last December owing to the breakdown of his health. He improved after getting the rest and comfort of home, and many of his friends believed that he would get better. Beyond getting so far as to be able to take short walks, however, he never recovered, and he himself expressed no hope of recovery. Uncomplainingly he passed the time. There was none who took greater interest in the war, and there were few in Strathcarron who understood and could piece together the various items of the war news.

A brother of the deceased is in France with his regiment. He came from South America and enlisted at Liverpool when he landed.

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Kennedy

Photo: #6337

Kennedy J M, Sgt, Lochcarron

Sergeant J. M. Kennedy

Date of Paper: 30.05.1919
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): J. M.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 6th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Arinackaig, Strathcarron

No Headline

Sergt J. M. Kennedy, R.A.V.C., Arinackaig, Strathcarron, enlisted on 21st December, 1915. He received his training at the Highland Divisional Veterinary Hospital, Melton Ernest, Beds, and was subsequently attached as veterinary sergeant to various artillery units. He was for a time with the 64th Divisional Mobile Veterinary Section in Norfolk. He went to France with the 6th Battalion M.G.C. and was there when the Armistice was signed.

He was demobilised in January this year, and has returned to the Lews, where he is a county organiser under the North of Scotland College of Agriculture.

Photo: #6335

Little James, Pte, Lochcarron

Private James Little

Date of Paper: 20.12.1918
Surname: Little
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: Seaview, Lochcarron

No Headline

Mrs Little, Seaview, Lochcarron, has recived intimation that her husband, Pte. Jas. Little, 1/9th Royal Scots, was killed in action on the 1st of August last during the heavy figting near Buzancy. In a letter from his Coy-Qr.-M. Sergt., it is stated that the losses of the Royal Scots were very heavy, but the sacrifices then made were largely responsible for the overwhelming success of Genral Mangin’s attack. The letter is as follows:

“France 30/10/18.
“Dear Mrs Little – Your husband, Pte. Jas. Little, was killed on the 1st of August at a place near Buzancy, in the Soissons district. You may have read in the newspaper about the good work done there by our Division, which took the key position that made General Mangin’s attack there so successful. Our own battalion had a very difficult task during the operations, and in the attack on 1st of August we lost very very heavily. In D Coy. alone we had 52 men killed. It will relieve you to know that your husband did not suffer. He was shot through the heart, and death was instantaneous. The task set the Company was well-nigh an impossible one, and the men were exposed to very heavy machine gun fire. They were all buried on the field, in a place well known, I believe, as the Quarry Cemetery, about 4 kilometres south of Buzancy. The French have erected a monument to the memory of the Scottish soldiers who fell there. It was a black day for the battalion, but the success of the operations was due in great part to the sacrifices made by the men. This is a very bald statement of the facts as I know them. Those of us who are still left with the Company sympathise with you in your bereavement.

“Pte. Little was a good soldier, and was well liked by his comrades. Most of his friends, indeed nearly all his platoon, were killed, and he himself had gone further forward than them all, only to make the supreme sacrifice in the end.

“I am, your sincerely, L. Y Wilson, C.-Q.-M. Sgt”.

No photo available

Alick Macdonald

Date of Paper: 26.05.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron

THE LATE PTE. WM. MACDONALD, STRATHCARRON

News was received on 4th May, 1916, by his mother that her son, Pte. Wm. M. Macdonald, No. 47028, 1st Canadian Contingent, died of severe wounds in a clearing station in France on 29th April. Deceased was the youngest son of the late Wm. Macdonald, road surveyor, and Mrs Macdonald, Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron, Ross-shire. Deceased served his time in the old Caledonian Bank at Lochcarron, after which he was transferred to the head office at Inverness. He left there to take up an appointment in the branch of the Argentine Bank in London and River Plate Bank at Buenos Aires. He then emigrated to Canada, and on the outbreak of war enlisted in the 48th Highlanders of Canada. By a strange coincidence his brother, Alick, joined the same regiment, but neither was aware of the fact until they accidentally met in the trenches. His regiment went to France about eighteen months ago, and has been through some severe fighting, but up to the time he was fatally wounded he came through without a scratch, although by his letters he had many narrow escapes. He was the youngest of eleven of a family, was over 6 ft. in height, and his death is the first break in the family. Much sympathy is felt for his mother, sisters and brothers.

See entry below for details of his brother William Macdonald

Photo: #6501

Macdonald William, Pte, Strathcarron

Private William M. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 26.05.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): William M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron

THE LATE PTE. WM. MACDONALD, STRATHCARRON

News was received on 4th May, 1916, by his mother that her son, Pte. Wm. M. Macdonald, No. 47028, 1st Canadian Contingent, died of severe wounds in a clearing station in France on 29th April. Deceased was the youngest son of the late Wm. Macdonald, road surveyor, and Mrs Macdonald, Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron, Ross-shire. Deceased served his time in the old Caledonian Bank at Lochcarron, after which he was transferred to the head office at Inverness. He left there to take up an appointment in the branch of the Argentine Bank in London and River Plate Bank at Buenos Aires. He then emigrated to Canada, and on the outbreak of war enlisted in the 48th Highlanders of Canada. By a strange coincidence his brother, Alick, joined the same regiment, but neither was aware of the fact until they accidentally met in the trenches. His regiment went to France about eighteen months ago, and has been through some severe fighting, but up to the time he was fatally wounded he came through without a scratch, although by his letters he had many narrow escapes. He was the youngest of eleven of a family, was over 6 ft. in height, and his death is the first break in the family. Much sympathy is felt for his mother, sisters and brothers.

See entry above for details of his brother Alick Macdonald

Photo: #6453

Macdonald Kenneth N, Seaman, Plockton

Seaman Kenneth Norman Macdonald

Date of Paper: 07.09.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Kenneth Norman
Rank: Seaman
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: Yorke Cottage, Plockton

No Headline

We reproduce in this week’s issue a portrait of Kenneth Norman Macdonald, elder son of Mrs Macdonald, Yorke Cottage, Plockton, who lost his life while on duty in one of H.M. ships on war service. Only 20 years of age, Norman, as he was always familiarly called, was one of the most promising of all the talented boys who have passed through the Plockton Higher Grade School.

Gifted by nature with faculties of the highest order, endowed with an innate thirst for knowledge, carefully watched over and guided by loving parents, his mental powers developed at an abnormal rate. Though Norman could easily have passed the examination for the immediate certificate at the age of 13, his teachers thought 14 early enough to present him. He passed 6 subjects, and also gained a bursary under the Highlands and Islands Trust. In the following year, when he was 15, he was presented and passed in 5 subjects of the Higher Grade at the leaving certificate examination. Being considered too young to enter a University, he attended the Grammar School, Aberdeen, for a year, where he was amongst the first prizemen in all his classes, and gained a bursary of £30 for 5 years, tenable at Aberdeen University. He then proceeded to the University, his intention being to graduate M.A., and then go in for medicine. At the University also in his classes he was first or amongst the first in the subjects taken, and had passed the degree examination in these; but he was burning to do his bit, and, as soon as he was of age to join H.M. Forces, he offered his services; not however, before obtaining the consent of his father and mother.

Norman, like many other gifted persons, was one of the meekest of mortals; nothing displeased him more than to hear any of his friends talk of his attainments or of his successes. Not only was Norman one of the most, talented, and one of the humblest, he was one of the best of lads. His headmaster has said of him: “Never during all Norman’s school career, as far as I remember, have I ever had cause to say an unkind, an unpleasant word to him either for lessons or for conduct.” He was a noble boy and right nobly has he given his life for his country.

Photo: #6540

Mackay John, Sapper, Canada Ex Stromeferry

Sapper John Mackay

Date of Paper: 03.05.1918
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sapper
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Portachullin, Stromeferry

HONOUR TO LOCHALSH CANADIAN

Sapper John Mackay, Canadians, who enlisted in Vancouver, B.C., and came overseas at the beginning of the war, has received the French Croix de Guerre. He has been attached to the Royal Navy siege guns in Belgium for two years. He is a native of Portachullin, Stromeferry. A photo appears to-day.

Photo: #6330

Mackenzie A, L Corp, Lochcarron

Lance Corporal A. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 25.05.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lochcarron

MILITARY MEDAL TO LOCHCARRON SEAFORTH

23251 Lance Corporal A. Mackenzie, Seaforths, has won the Military Medal for bravery on the battlefield. He went to France in November 1914 and saw much active service. He escaped so far without a scratch. He is a son of Roderick Mackenzie, mason contractor, Lochcarron. Before the war broke out he was an apprentice blacksmith in Kinlochewe. He joined the Seaforths a year before war was declared, and was called up at mobilisation.

A photograph appears today.

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