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Photo: #6602

Cameron Donald, Pte, Ullapool

Private D. Cameron

Date of Paper: 22.06.1917
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Pulteney Street, Ullapool

THE LATE PTE. D. CAMERON, SEAFORTHS

Pte. D. Cameron, Seaforths, 40128, killed in action, was the son of Mr John Cameron, Pulteney Street, Ullapool. Joining the battalion at mobilisation, and, after training, for over a year he was on the Administrative Staff working as a tailor at the Depot at Dingwall. A quiet, modest, unassuming lad, he was much respected at home in Ullapool, in Dingwall, and by his comrades in arms. In his 21st year, he was an only son.

Pte. Cameron was transferred to a Seaforth Service battalion on going to the Front. His officer, Lt. A. R. Stewart Grant, in a letter to the father, writes: “It is with the deepest regret I write to inform you of the death of your son, Pte. D. Cameron, 40128. He was killed on April 7th by a shell whilst fetching rations to his platoon. The officers, n.c.o.’s and men of the company mourn his death, and join with me hoping that God will give you courage to bear his loss. He was buried behind the line in a military cemetery with full funeral rites.”

Photo: #6594

Campbell John, Corp, Ullapool

Corporal John Campbell

Date of Paper: 11.08.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): John
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Morefield, Ullapool

ULLAPOOL SEAFORTH WOUNDED

Above we reproduce the photograph of 2998, Corporal John Campbell, E (Ullapool) Coy., 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders, whom we reported in our last issue as having been wounded on the 15th inst. He is a son of Mrs Campbell Morefield, Ullapool. A tailor to trade, previous to the war Corporal Campbell worked in the Lochbroom Tweed Mills, before which he was employed in Glasgow.

Date of Paper: Undated

MILITARY AWARDS TO AN ULLAPOOL SEAFORTH

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of 200785 (2998) Sergt. John Campbell, Seaforths, an Ullapool man, who, as already recorded, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and Medal Militaire for conspicuous bravery in the field at the battle of Arras in April last. Sergt. Campbell, it will be recalled, single-handed, attacked a German machine gun and team which were holding up the attack in the sector, and put them out of action. “It was a grand piece of work,” an officer wrote, “not unworthy of a higher honour.” An officer, writing to Sergt. Campbell’s sister, who at present resides at Skelmorlie, Ayrshire, says:- Your brother has been awarded the D.C.M. and Medaille Militaire [remainder obliterated]

Handwritten notes: “June 29/1917 – D.C.M. Feb. 15/1918 – Bar to D.C.M. Wounded 21.3.1918 and 14.4.1918”

Photo: #6592

Fowler John, Capt Sir, Ullapool

Captain Sir John Fowler

Date of Paper: Illegible
Surname: Fowler
First Name(s): John
Rank: Captain
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Lochbroom

The Late Sir John Fowler, Bart.

Killed In Action

Captain Sir John Fowler, whose death while serving with the 1/4th Seaforths in France took place on Tuesday morning, June 22nd, was the grandson of the eminent engineer who made his name by the designing and carrying out of the London Underground Railway and the construction of the Forth Bridge.

Sir John’s father, the late Sir Arthur Fowler, died in March 1899 and it was not till seven years later that young Sir John attained his majority.

Like his father and grandfather, he had a strong predilection for the sea and wished to enter the Navy as a profession but defective eyesight prevented this course from being adopted. He was therefore educated at Harrow in the late Mr H. O. Davidson’s house and rose rapidly to the Sixth, or top form, passing at 18 direct into Sandhurst from Harrow, and having also qualified for Woolwich.
The lessons learnt from the Boer War in the early years of this century had led the military authorities to adopt a much higher standard of efficiency and discipline for cadets at Sandhurst than had been sufficient in the past. Colonel Kitson, who commanded the Military College in 1903, inaugurated the new regime with great ability and energy, and it was fortunate for Sir John Fowler and his brother that they passed through Sandhurst during Colonel Kitson’s administration.
Sir John Fowler was the first cadet to be offered a commision under the new rules by Colonel Kitson. The commision was in one of the best known cavalry regiments about to proceed to India. Sir John was also given the opportunity of entering two of the Guards regiments, but, acting upon the advice of eminent and experienced officers, he decided to wait for a vacancy in the Seaforth Highlanders, the regiment so closely connected with Ross-shire.

Having received his commission in the 78th Highlanders, he joined the Battalion in Dublin, and was subsequently stationed at Aldershot, the Castle, Edinburgh, and Fort George, and finally at Shorncliffe.

In October 1913 he was appointed to the adjutancy of the 4th Seaforths (Territorial Battalion), and was in consequence able to spend most of his weekends on his property in Lochbroom on which he had been born and brought up.

His tastes were all for country life, and he passed many happy autumn days stalking and shooting. But his greatest enjoyment was always a day spent on the waters of the Moray Firth or of Lochbroom in a small open motor boat.

While stationed at Edinburgh in 1907 and 1908 he twice acted as aide-de-camp to the Lord High Commisioner (at that time Lord Kinnaird) during the latter’s residence at Holyrood, for the fortnight in May for the meetings of the General Assembly.

As an officer of the Royal Company of Archers he acted as one of the King’s Bodyguard on the occasion of His Majesty’s visit to Holyrood in 1911 and he shortly afterwards received the Coronation Medal.

Though baptised and brought up Church of England, he and his brother were regular attendants at the Parish Church of Lochbroom, there being no Episcopalian Church within 35 miles of their home. Both brothers thus acquired a great love for the Scottish Psalms unaccompanied by any musical instrument. When superintending regimental services Sir John never favoured the introduction of many hymns, and, writing from France, he spoke of the grand effect of the old Scotch Psalm tunes at the open air services, held sometimes within sound of the guns, with friendly and hostile aeroplanes circling overhead.

He saw many of his Battalion laid to rest among the blossoming fruit trees of the cemetery at Vielle Chapelle, and, in speaking of some of the engagements in which many of his best friends fell, he said: “The charge of the Light Brigade fades into nothing compared with what we have witnessed in the present war.”

Within the last two months three officers who held in succession the post of Adjutant to the 4th Seaforths have laid down their lives for their King and Country, namely: Major Arbuthnot with the 2nd Battalion; Captain Davidson with the 1st Battalion; and Sir John Fowler with the 4th Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders.

And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers
And the temples of his gods.

Photo: #6324

Macaskill Alexander, Sgt, Leckmelm

Sergeant Alick Macaskill

Date of Paper: 17.11.1916
Surname: Macaskill
Forename: Alexander
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths / Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Leckmelm, Lochbroom

LOCHBROOM SEAFORTH MISSING, BELIEVED KILLED

Sergt. Alick Macaskill, Seaforths, missing, believed killed on 16th October, was a son of Captain D. Macaskill and Mrs Macaskill, late of Leckmelm, Lochbroom, and now residing with their daughter, Mrs Webster, Police Chambers, Greenock. Sergeant Macaskill, who was 31 years of age, enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders on 14th November 1914, and was trained at Cromarty and Nigg. He was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in November 1915, and in the following February proceeded to France. A typical Highlander, and a brave soldier, he was popular with his men.

In a letter to Mrs Macaskill, Sergeant Macaskill’s officer writes: “It is with the greatest regret that I have to inform you that your son is missing, believed killed, on September 16th. It is very terrible for you, but I feel sure you will wish to know the facts of the case, and I will tell you them as far as I know. Your son was under my senior officer, and was with several others in a shell hole on the morning of the 16th. He was firing his gun, and my officer had gone to visit another gun. Just as he was returning a shell burst, blowing the gun to pieces and also two of the men in the shell hole. There was nothing to identify the men, bur from their build it appears that one of them must have been your son. I have purposely delayed writing in order to see if anything should come through from the hospitals, as there is just the possibility even now that he may be only wounded, though in my heart of hearts I am afraid your gallant son has died on the field of battle. It has been a most terrible shock to me, as your son and I have always associated ever since this company was formed. Always popular with all ranks, and ever cheerful, he was at the same time a man with a stern sense of duty. I feel that I have lost one of my best friends, as friends we were many times in the trenches. We have talked over old times and our respective doings. Your son was one of the finest men it has ever been my privilege to meet. Madam, in your hours of sorrow reflect one moment what more glorious end could a man wish for: to die on the field of battle while dealing out death to the accursed race that is at this very moment falling headlong to its doom. Officers and men of the 61st Company, and especially the few remaining out of his own section, join with me in expressing to you and all his loved ones our most heartfelt sympathy in your terrible loss.

P.S. I had already recommended your son for the D.C.M., but as posthumous rewards are not granted, I shall recommend that he be mentioned in dispatches.”

Photo: #6597

Macdonald Ewan N, L Corp, Ullapool

Lance Corporal Ewan N. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 08.09.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Ewan N.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Inverlael Farm, Ullapool

No Headline

Mr William Macdonald, late of Loggie and Kildonan, Lochbroom, has received intimation that his son, Mr Ewan N. Macdonald, Inverlael Farm, has been killed in action on the 18th inst in France. When war broke out he was a joint tenant with his brother in the farm of Inverlael. After the battle of Loos, when the outlook did not seem too bright, Ewan could not resist the call of King and country; leaving the farm in charge of his brother, he enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders.
A typical Highlander, physically robust, and of a very cheerful disposition, he was a general favourite; having got through his training quickly, he was attached to a draft sent to fill the gaps in the regiment at the front, where he was continually until the end. His mother, who died some years ago, was the only daughter of the late Mr John Stewart, tacksman of Drumchork and Little Gruinard Farms, and sister of Mr Stewart, Zetville, Aultbea. The sympathy of the community is extended to Mr Macdonald and family in their sudden bereavement.

Captain Gray, the officer commanding, in writing to Mr Macdonald, says “We are all feeling deeply the loss of your son, as he was always cheerful and happy, and a great big favourite with us all, I can only offer you sincere sympathy in your great loss, and I would like to let you know that Ewan’s comrades also wish me to inform you how much they feel for you.”

Photo: #5875

Macgregor Duncan, Pte, Badcaul

Private Duncan McGregor

Date of Paper: 08.03.1918
Surname: Macgregor
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Badcaul

No Headline

A photograph is reproduced today of Pte. Duncan McGregor, Machine Gun Corps, who died lately in Sheffield Hospital of pneumonia. Before answering his country’s call, Pte. McGregor was road contractor on the Garve to Ullapool road, where he had many hard fights with the elements, when snows blocked his section. When freed for military service, he joined the 4th Seaforths. An excellent marksman, after training he was sent for a special course with the Machine Gun Corps in Nottinghamshire. Contracting measles, pneumonia supervened. During his last days, his father, Mr Rod. McGregor, Badcaul, was sent for, and reached his son a few hours before the end. The remains of deceased were brought home, and laid to rest in the family burying ground at Gruinard. Great sympathy is felt for his parents and other members of the family, four of whom, two brothers and sisters, are in British Columbia. Pte. McGregor is deeply regretted in the scenes of his boyhood, as well as by those who knew him on the Dheirie road, and his cheery manner and kindly ways will long be remembered.

Photo: #6610

Mackenzie Alexander, Sgt, Ullapool

Sergeant Alexander Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 24.03.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Craigmore House, Shore Street, Ullapool

Two 1/4th Seaforths who have “done their bit” and are now home on furlough time-expired, are Sergt. A. Mackenzie, D.C.M., and Sergt. Wm. Mackenzie, of E (Ullapool) Coy., and sons of Mr and Mrs Wm. Mackenzie, Craigmore House, Shore Street, Ullapool. Sergt. Mackenzie, who is a tailor to trade, was a Territorial previous to the war, and was a private on mobilisation. He rose rapidly in the ranks, and he has been through every engagement in which the 1/4th have taken part. At the battle of Loos on 25th September he had the misfortune to be gassed, but made a good recovery. Sergt. Mackenzie has been honoured with the Croix de Guerre from the French Republic in recognition of his courage. Sergt. Wm. Mackenzie has also been with the 1/4ths since mobilisation, and has been wounded on three occasions.

Date of Paper: 18.08.1916

ROSS-SHIRE D.C.M. and C. de G.

We reproduce today a portrait of Sergeant Alexander Mackenzie, 4th Seaforths, Ullapool, who was recently presented at Invergordon, at the hands of General Sir W. T. C. Lindsay, with the Distinguished Conduct Medal and Croix de Guerre. The portrait reproduced last week was that of his brother, Sergeant Wm. Mackenzie, also of the 4th Seaforths.

See entry below for details of his brother William Mackenzie

Photo: #6611

Mackenzie William, Sgt, Ullapool

Sergeant William Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 24.03.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): William
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Craigmore House, Shore Street, Ullapool

Two 1/4th Seaforths who have “done their bit” and are now home on furlough time-expired, are Sergt. A. Mackenzie, D.C.M., and Sergt. Wm. Mackenzie, of E (Ullapool) Coy., and sons of Mr and Mrs Wm. Mackenzie, Craigmore House, Shore Street, Ullapool. Sergt. Mackenzie, who is a tailor to trade, was a Territorial previous to the war, and was a private on mobilisation. He rose rapidly in the ranks, and he has been through every engagement in which the 1/4th have taken part. At the battle of Loos on 25th September he had the misfortune to be gassed, but made a good recovery. Sergt. Mackenzie has been honoured with the Croix de Guerre from the French Republic in recognition of his courage. Sergt. Wm. Mackenzie has also been with the 1/4ths since mobilisation, and has been wounded on three occasions.

Date of Paper: 18.08.1916

ROSS-SHIRE D.C.M. and C. de G.

We reproduce today a portrait of Sergeant Alexander Mackenzie, 4th Seaforths, Ullapool, who was recently presented at Invergordon, at the hands of General Sir W. T. C. Lindsay, with the Distinguished Conduct Medal and Croix de Guerre. The portrait reproduced last week was that of his brother, Sergeant Wm. Mackenzie, also of the 4th Seaforths.

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Mackenzie

Photo: #6490

Mackenzie Alick, Corp, Scorraig

Corporal Alick Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.12.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Scots Fusiliers
Home Address: 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell

LATE CORPORAL A. MACKENZIE, SCORRAIG

We reproduce in these columns photographs of the late Corporal Alick Mackenzie, Royal Scots Fusiliers, and 2nd Air Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie, Royal Flying Corps, sons of Mr A. Mackenzie, 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell. The late Corpl. Mackenzie, on leaving school, entered the service of Messrs MacBrayne’s Steamship Coy., Glasgow. After being nine years with the firm he was appointed chief steward. He was greatly esteemed on the whole line, his cheerful and pleasant manner making him a great favourite. With the object of gaining further experience he went to New York, and joined the Clyde Steamship Coy., Santo Domingo Line, and subsequently became chief steward on the S.S. Algoquin, running between New York and the West Indies. When the war broke out his sense of duty was strong, and notwithstanding the pressure put upon him by his employers to stay, he threw up everything, left New York, and came to Scotland on 15th February last. While he was at home he lost a brother, which was a sore blow to the family. In March the deceased went to Glasgow and joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and received his training at Fort Matilda. He took an great interest in his work, and received rapid promotion. In seven weeks time he received his first strip, and before leaving for France he was promoted Corporal. He was only three weeks on the Western front, when in the battle of the Somme, on 30th July, he fell in action. At first he was reported missing, but subsequently he was officially reported killed. Deceased was in his 27th year.
Air-Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie is a ship carpenter to trade, and for the past two and a half years was sailing on the City of Bristol which runs between New York and Russia. He was so keen to join the Army that he last June joined the Royal Engineers in Glasgow. Since then he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and is now training somewhere in England.

Another brother, Murdo, is a shipwright to trade and is engaged in naval work. He joined the colours, but was retained by the Admiralty.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6489

Mackenzie Kenneth, Air Mechanic, Scorraig

Air Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.12.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Air Mechanic
Regiment: Royal Flying Corps
Home Address: 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell

LATE CORPORAL A. MACKENZIE, SCORRAIG

We reproduce in these columns photographs of the late Corporal Alick Mackenzie, Royal Scots Fusiliers, and 2nd Air Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie, Royal Flying Corps, sons of Mr A. Mackenzie, 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell. The late Corpl. Mackenzie, on leaving school, entered the service of Messrs MacBrayne’s Steamship Coy., Glasgow. After being nine years with the firm he was appointed chief steward. He was greatly esteemed on the whole line, his cheerful and pleasant manner making him a great favourite. With the object of gaining further experience he went to New York, and joined the Clyde Steamship Coy., Santo Domingo Line, and subsequently became chief steward on the S.S. Algoquin, running between New York and the West Indies. When the war broke out his sense of duty was strong, and notwithstanding the pressure put upon him by his employers to stay, he threw up everything, left New York, and came to Scotland on 15th February last. While he was at home he lost a brother, which was a sore blow to the family. In March the deceased went to Glasgow and joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and received his training at Fort Matilda. He took an great interest in his work, and received rapid promotion. In seven weeks time he received his first strip, and before leaving for France he was promoted Corporal. He was only three weeks on the Western front, when in the battle of the Somme, on 30th July, he fell in action. At first he was reported missing, but subsequently he was officially reported killed. Deceased was in his 27th year.
Air-Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie is a ship carpenter to trade, and for the past two and a half years was sailing on the City of Bristol which runs between New York and Russia. He was so keen to join the Army that he last June joined the Royal Engineers in Glasgow. Since then he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and is now training somewhere in England.

Another brother, Murdo, is a shipwright to trade and is engaged in naval work. He joined the colours, but was retained by the Admiralty.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Murdo Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 15.12.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank:
Regiment: The Admiralty
Home Address: 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell

LATE CORPORAL A. MACKENZIE, SCORRAIG

We reproduce in these columns photographs of the late Corporal Alick Mackenzie, Royal Scots Fusiliers, and 2nd Air Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie, Royal Flying Corps, sons of Mr A. Mackenzie, 3 Lots, Scorraig, Dundonnell. The late Corpl. Mackenzie, on leaving school, entered the service of Messrs MacBrayne’s Steamship Coy., Glasgow. After being nine years with the firm he was appointed chief steward. He was greatly esteemed on the whole line, his cheerful and pleasant manner making him a great favourite. With the object of gaining further experience he went to New York, and joined the Clyde Steamship Coy., Santo Domingo Line, and subsequently became chief steward on the S.S. Algoquin, running between New York and the West Indies. When the war broke out his sense of duty was strong, and notwithstanding the pressure put upon him by his employers to stay, he threw up everything, left New York, and came to Scotland on 15th February last. While he was at home he lost a brother, which was a sore blow to the family. In March the deceased went to Glasgow and joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and received his training at Fort Matilda. He took an great interest in his work, and received rapid promotion. In seven weeks time he received his first strip, and before leaving for France he was promoted Corporal. He was only three weeks on the Western front, when in the battle of the Somme, on 30th July, he fell in action. At first he was reported missing, but subsequently he was officially reported killed. Deceased was in his 27th year.
Air-Mechanic Kenneth Mackenzie is a ship carpenter to trade, and for the past two and a half years was sailing on the City of Bristol which runs between New York and Russia. He was so keen to join the Army that he last June joined the Royal Engineers in Glasgow. Since then he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and is now training somewhere in England.

Another brother, Murdo, is a shipwright to trade and is engaged in naval work. He joined the colours, but was retained by the Admiralty.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6492

Mackenzie Duncan, Pte, Scorraig

Private Duncan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: 9th Seaforths
Home Address: Little Scorraig, Dundonnell

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entries below for details of his four brothers and sister

Photo: #6495

Mackenzie Finlay, Sgt, Scorraig

Sergeant Finlay Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Finlay
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 9th Seaforths
Home Address: Little Scorraig, Dundonnell

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers and sister

Photo: #6491

Mackenzie James, Corp, Scorraig

Corporal James Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): James
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Mechanical Transport, Army Service Corps
Home Address: Little Scorraig (Dundonnell)

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entries above and entries below for details of his four brothers and sister

Photo: #6493

Mackenzie John, Pte, Scorraig

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: B Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Little Scorraig, Dundonnell

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entries above and entries below for details of his four brothers and sister

No photo available

Telephone Clerk Margaret Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): (Miss) Margaret
Rank: Telephone Clerk
Regiment: Admiralty
Home Address: Little Scorraig, Dundonnell

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entries above and entry below for details of her five brothers

Photo: #6494

Mackenzie Peter, Pte, Scorraig

Private Peter Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.05.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Peter
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Little Scorraig, Dundonnell

No Headline

The family of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Little Scorraig, Dundonnell, is one of the many in Ross-shire who showed an excellent example to the country in the European War. Five sons and one daughter have assisted King and Country, a record which both parents and children have every reason to be proud of. Unfortunately this has not been done without sacrifice, and the parents found their “cup of sorrow” full when they learned that in the Battle of Loos, on 25th September, 1915, their son, 8657 Private John Mackenzie, B. Company, 10th Highland Light Infantry, had been killed in action. Pte. Mackenzie, who was 30 years of age, previous to the war was employed at the British Aluminium Works, Kinlochleven, where he had been for nine years. A young man of sterling worth, he started at the bottom of the ladder, and in a short space of time he was appointed foreman of the works, a position of trust which he filled with satisfaction to his employers.

Pte. Duncan and Sergt. Finlay were pioneers with the 9th Seaforths in France, while Corpl. James was with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. Before hostilities broke out these three brothers were blacksmiths to trade, and all served their apprenticeship with Messrs W. Park & Sons, van and lorry builders, Commerce Street, Glasgow, and were still with the same firm when they enlisted.
The youngest boy, Peter, served with the 2/2nd Lovat Scouts somewhere in England. He was the helper on the croft at home, but could not resist the call, and enlisted.

Miss Margaret Mackenzie, a sister, who lived at home, was in the employment of the Admiralty as a telephone clerk.

Photographs of the five sons are reproduced today.

See entries above for details of his four brothers and sister