Seaforths WW I page 5

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Photo: #6629

Ross William, CSM, Ardersier Seaforths

Company Sergeant-Major William Ross

Date of Paper: 20.10.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): William
Rank: Company Sergeant Major
Regiment: 8th Seaforths
Home Address: Murray House, Ardersier

ROSS-SHIRE 8th SEAFORTH WOUNDED

Company Sergeant-Major William Ross, No. 1935, 8th Seaforths, who is reported wounded at the battle of Loos on 25th September, has not been heard of since, and his wife, Mrs Ross, Murray House, Ardersier, asks for information. Company Sergt-Major Ross, whose portrait we give above, was an ex-soldier with 18 years’ service to his credit, 10 of which were completed abroad. During his service he was awarded the Relief of Chitral Medal (1895) and is the Long Service and good Conduct decorations. A colour-sergeant at the time of his retirement, on rejoining he was promoted. He is the youngest son of the late Mr Hugh Ross, for upwards of 33 years on the Invergordon Ferry. His mother and sister reside at Fettes, Redcastle, Killearnan.

Captain Murray tells Mrs Ross that her husband was one of the first to cross the parapet at the taking of Hill 70, and that after being wounded he could get no further account of Sergt. Ross, who, he says, was a gallant soldier and well liked by his men. Captain Murray was one of the few officers of the 8th Seaforths left after the advance.

Much sympathy will be expressed with Mrs Ross in her anxiety.

Date of Paper: 13.11.1916

ROSS-SHIRE SEAFORTH WHO FELL AT LOOS

Mrs Ross, Murray House, Ardersier, has now been informed that her husband, Coy. Sergt-Major Wm. Ross, Seaforths, who was reported wounded and missing at Loos, on 25th September, 1914, is now presumed by the Army Council to be dead. A message of sympathy from the King has been sent by Mr D. Lloyd George.

Company Sergt.-Major Ross, whose portrait we give above, was an ex-soldier with 18 years’ service to his credit, 10 of which were completed abroad. During his service he was awarded the Relief of Chitral Medal (1895) and also the Long Service and Good Conduct [remainder obliterated].

Photo: #6666

Rowerth J, Pte, Manchester Seaforths

Private J. Rowerth

Date of Paper: 24.12.1915
Surname: Rowerth
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 23, Gordon Road, Menton, Eccles, Manchester

2836 Private J. Rowerth, A (Tain) Company, killed on 9th May, was the son of Mrs Rowerth, 23 Gordon Road, Menton, Eccles, Manchester. He was reported wounded on 9th May, but no trace of him could be subsequently found, and on 20th June he was reported missing, believed killed. The Record Office have now intimated that he was killed. Private Rowerth joined the 4th Seaforths on 12th January, 1915, and after training in Bedford went out with a draft on 18th April. He died for his country within three weeks, and after having been in the army for 16 weeks only. He reached his majority in the trenches six days before he met his fate. He was an assistant pawnbroker to trade, and was employed in Salford.

Photo: #6697

Russell Peter, Sgt, Glasgow Seaforths

Sergeant Peter Russell

Date of Paper: 05.10.1917
Surname: Russell
First Name(s): Peter
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Glasgow

Sergt. Peter Russell, M.M., Seaforths, who was killed on 31st July and whose photograph appears today, belonged to Glasgow, where his mother resides. Sergt. Russell enlisted early in August 1914, and went through all the battles fought in the early part of the war. In September 1915 he was wounded at Loos, but recovered, and returned to the trenches. In April last Sergt. Russell was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. At the same time he was offered a commission, but he declined, preferring to remain in the ranks. He was popular with his men, all of whom extend deep sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.

In a letter to Mrs Russell, the Chaplain writes: “The news will have reached you. The sad news of your son’s death in action, Sergt. P. Russell, Seaforths. It is a personal grief of no light character to a great many of us. Peter was one of the men we thought was coming through this war. He had come through so much already and had so many escapes. He was, besides, such a splendid fellow. The life and soul of his platoon, all of whom will never forget him for his consideration and the example he showed. He was brave as any, and one of the coolest men in danger. He was worthy of the decoration he wore, and the regiment is proud of him. He was one of the first men to be hit in the attack which opened on the 31st July near Ypres. He was advancing with his platoon – behaving in the most gallant manner and leading them into action when he fell. He did not live more than a few minutes. His words were: ‘Goodbye lads, carry on’. A stretcher-bearer was left with him, but his assistance was not needed. He had finished his course. None showed such endurance and cheerful courage. I shall miss him, so shall many of them. There is scarcely another that I knew so well, for the regiment had undergone many changes, but while we mourn the loss of one of the cheeriest of comrades, you will grieve the loss of a dear son.”

Photo: #6682

Sewell William Fane Dalziel Dalrymple, Pte, London Seaforths

Private William F. D. D. Sewell

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Sewell
First Name(s): William Fane Dalziel Dalrymple
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 20, Balcombe Street, London, N.W.

Sewell, Private William Fane Dalziel Dalrymple, 2053. B (Dingwal) Coy., killed in action 11th March, 1915; only son of Mr W. G. Dalrymple Sewell, 20 Balcombe Street, London, N.W. Born on 24 March, 1896. Grandson of the late Colonel H. Fane H. Sewell, H.M. Indian Army, and great-grandson of the late General Sir William Henry Sewell, K.C.B., 79th Cameron Highlanders.

No photo available

Lieutenant A. Sharp

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Sharp
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Horsham

As recently reported, news has reached Horsham of the death in action on the Western Front of Sergt. (acting S.M.) John Sharp, Seaforths. The youngest son of Mr and Mrs J Sharp, Culross Farm, Horsham, the late Sergt. Sharp (whose photograph appears today) was a native of Logie Parish, near Stirling, and went to England with his parents when eight years of age. After finishing his education at Horsham Grammar School, he served an apprenticeship in the workshops of Messrs. Rice Bros., motor engineers, Horsham. He was engaged in the engineering shop when he joined up early in September, 1914, along with his brother, now Lieut. A. Sharp, Seaforths. He went to France with his battalion in November 1914, and passed uninjured through the earlier engagements in which the battalion took part. He was slightly wounded in the Somme fighting of July, 1916. After a rapid recovery and a short time with the Reserves at home, he rejoined his old comrades early in the present year, to fall on November 22nd. Of a fine type physically, his loss is much regretted by a wide circle of friends. An enthusiastic member of the Horsham Caledonian Society, he was celebrated for miles around as a brilliant step dancer, securing the Society’s championship medal for the sword dance and Highland fling three years out of four. In the county battalion Sergt. Sharp was greatly respected, and old comrades, reading with sorrow of his having “gone West” will feel deep sympathy with his bereaved relatives.

Lt. A. Sharp, Seaforths, deceased’s brother, was educated at the Polytechnic, Regent St., London, where he passed his examinations with distinction, taking honours. Subsequently he was employed as a technical teacher at the Polytechnic. On the outbreak of war he joined up with his brother in September 1914, and went to France with the battalion in November of the same year to join the First Seven Divisions. He received his commission in May, 1915.

See entry below for details of his brother John Sharp

Photo: #6694

Sharp John, Sgt, Horsham Seaforths

Sergeant John Sharp

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Sharp
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Horsham

As recently reported, news has reached Horsham of the death in action on the Western Front of Sergt. (acting S.M.) John Sharp, Seaforths. The youngest son of Mr and Mrs J Sharp, Culross Farm, Horsham, the late Sergt. Sharp (whose photograph appears today) was a native of Logie Parish, near Stirling, and went to England with his parents when eight years of age. After finishing his education at Horsham Grammar School, he served an apprenticeship in the workshops of Messrs. Rice Bros., motor engineers, Horsham. He was engaged in the engineering shop when he joined up early in September, 1914, along with his brother, now Lieut. A. Sharp, Seaforths. He went to France with his battalion in November 1914, and passed uninjured through the earlier engagements in which the battalion took part. He was slightly wounded in the Somme fighting of July, 1916. After a rapid recovery and a short time with the Reserves at home, he rejoined his old comrades early in the present year, to fall on November 22nd. Of a fine type physically, his loss is much regretted by a wide circle of friends. An enthusiastic member of the Horsham Caledonian Society, he was celebrated for miles around as a brilliant step dancer, securing the Society’s championship medal for the sword dance and Highland fling three years out of four. In the county battalion Sergt. Sharp was greatly respected, and old comrades, reading with sorrow of his having “gone West” will feel deep sympathy with his bereaved relatives.

Lt. A. Sharp, Seaforths, deceased’s brother, was educated at the Polytechnic, Regent St., London, where he passed his examinations with distinction, taking honours. Subsequently he was employed as a technical teacher at the Polytechnic. On the outbreak of war he joined up with his brother in September 1914, and went to France with the battalion in November of the same year to join the First Seven Divisions. He received his commission in May, 1915.

See entry above for details of his brother A. Sharp

Photo: #6631

Shaw A L, L Corp, Grantham Seaforths

Lance Corporal A. L. Shaw

Date of paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Shaw
First Name(s): A. L.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Bridge Street, Grantham

Shaw, Lance-Corpl. A. L., 2062, and Pte Stanley Shaw, 2066, belonged to one of the best known Grantham families. They were sons of Mr and Mrs A. J. Shaw of Bridge Street, and grandsons of the late Mr John Shaw, J.P. Both were educated at the King’s School, Grantham, “Loo”afterwards entering the firm of Messrs A. & J. Shaw, leather dressers, Grantham, an extensive business established by his grandfather and great-uncle, whilst Stanley chose engineering as a profession, and was employed by Messrs R. Hornsby & Sons Ltd., the world-famed agricultural and general engineers of Grantham. “Loo” was a keen sportsman, being a prominent member of the Grantham Golf Club, and an ardent and daring motor cyclist, but Stanley was of a quiet studious nature. They, with their brother Arthur, were the tallest men in the 4th Seaforths, averaging 6ft 4 inches each, and were known as the “19 ft. of Shaws”. They were as good and brave as they were big, jovial, generous and staunch pals, and they are still greatly missed in Grantham.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

No photo available

Arthur Shaw

Date of paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Shaw
First Name(s): Arthur
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Bridge Street, Grantham

Shaw, Lance-Corpl. A. L., 2062, and Pte Stanley Shaw, 2066, belonged to one of the best known Grantham families. They were sons of Mr and Mrs A. J. Shaw of Bridge Street, and grandsons of the late Mr John Shaw, J.P. Both were educated at the King’s School, Grantham, “Loo”afterwards entering the firm of Messrs A. & J. Shaw, leather dressers, Grantham, an extensive business established by his grandfather and great-uncle, whilst Stanley chose engineering as a profession, and was employed by Messrs R. Hornsby & Sons Ltd., the world-famed agricultural and general engineers of Grantham. “Loo” was a keen sportsman, being a prominent member of the Grantham Golf Club, and an ardent and daring motor cyclist, but Stanley was of a quiet studious nature. They, with their brother Arthur, were the tallest men in the 4th Seaforths, averaging 6ft 4 inches each, and were known as the “19 ft. of Shaws”. They were as good and brave as they were big, jovial, generous and staunch pals, and they are still greatly missed in Grantham.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6674

Shaw Stanley, Pte, Grantham Seaforths

Private Stanley Shaw

Date of paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Shaw
First Name(s): Stanley
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Bridge Street, Grantham

Shaw, Lance-Corpl. A. L., 2062, and Pte Stanley Shaw, 2066, belonged to one of the best known Grantham families. They were sons of Mr and Mrs A. J. Shaw of Bridge Street, and grandsons of the late Mr John Shaw, J.P. Both were educated at the King’s School, Grantham, “Loo”afterwards entering the firm of Messrs A. & J. Shaw, leather dressers, Grantham, an extensive business established by his grandfather and great-uncle, whilst Stanley chose engineering as a profession, and was employed by Messrs R. Hornsby & Sons Ltd., the world-famed agricultural and general engineers of Grantham. “Loo” was a keen sportsman, being a prominent member of the Grantham Golf Club, and an ardent and daring motor cyclist, but Stanley was of a quiet studious nature. They, with their brother Arthur, were the tallest men in the 4th Seaforths, averaging 6ft 4 inches each, and were known as the “19 ft. of Shaws”. They were as good and brave as they were big, jovial, generous and staunch pals, and they are still greatly missed in Grantham.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6673

Smart Pte, Oxford Seaforths

Private Smart

Date of Paper: 03.03.1916
Surname: Smart
First Name(s): Not stated
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 39, Canal Street, St. Barnabas, Oxford

Private Smart is a son of Mrs Smart, 39 Canal Street, St Barnabas, Oxford

Photo: #6667

Smith John Dodds, Pte, Selkirk Seaforths

Private John Dodds Smith

Date of paper: 09.08.1918
Surname: Smith
First Name(s): John Dodds
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 58. Back Row, Selkirk

MISSING 4TH SEAFORTH

There is reproduced to-day a photo of Pte. John Dodds Smith, 203057, 4th Seaforths, who has been missing since the battle of Cambria in November, 1917, and about whom his mother, Mrs Smith, 58 Back Row, Selkirk, is anxious to receive any information.. Further than a statement by a man that Pte. Smith was captured, nothing has been heard of him since the battle. Pte. Smith, it may be mentioned – the fact may recall him to Seaforths – frequently signed his name as Ian Gow, a Celtic rendering of the name. The mother is confident in the hope that her son will turn up, and, believing that there are silent camps in Germany, she is anxious by more definite information from men of the regiment to confirm her own view. Anyone able to help her should write direct.

Photo: #6639

Stewart Algernon Bingham Anstruther, Lieut Colonel, South Kensington Seaforths

Lieut.-Colonel Algernon Bingham Anstruther Stewart

Date of Paper: 16.06.1916
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Algernon Bingham Anstruther
Rank: Lieut.-Colonel
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 51, Redcliffe Square, South Kensington

THE LATE LIEUT.-COLONEL STEWART, D.S.O.

Lieut.-Colonel Algernon Bingham Anstruther Stewart, D.S.O., commanding Seaforth Highlanders, who was killed in France, on May 23rd, was the eldest son of the late Colonel Charles Edward Stewart, C.B., C.M.G., C.I.E., Indian Staff Corps and Consul-General at Odessa, Russia, and Mrs Stewart (nee Anne Nairne Anstruther) of Ornockenoch, Kirkcudbrightshire, and 51 Redcliffe Square, South Kensington.

Lieut.-Colonel Stewart was born at sea in the Persian Gulf on December 6th, 1869, near the port of Bunder Abas. He was educated at Haileybury College, after which he became proficient in French at Neuchatel, Switzerland.

In 1899, he served one training with the 3rd Battalion (Militia) Seaforth Highlanders.
On leaving Sandhurst, he passed out high in Military Law, and, being in the Musical Ride which gave him his choice of regiment, he selected the Seaforths, being great-great-grandson of Francis, Lord Seaforth, who raised the 78th Highlanders, and whose relative raised the 72nd Highlanders, now linked together, formed the Seaforth Highlanders. Colonel Algernon Stewart, was the first descendant of Lord Seaforth to enter the regiment. He was soon followed by Major Kenneth Arbuthnot, killed near Ypres on April 25th, 1915, and later by Mr Andrew Arbuthnot (Militia Battalion) and Captain Archibald Midddleton, also killed near Ypres, April 25th, 1915, and still later by Captain Malcolm Arbuthnot, who was wounded at the same palace and date.

Before Colonel Stewart was gazetted, he attended unofficially a great Prussian review at Breslau in 1890. After a short period at Odessa, acquiring something of the Russian language, he was gazetted as from October, 1890, to the 2nd Battalion (78th) Seaforths, and joined that regiment in India, where to his chagrin he was only allowed to relieve the next senior officer who went on to the battalion on active service on the Black Mountain Expedition.

He served on the Chitral Campaign in1895, being present at the battle of Mamgai and at the relief of Chitral, obtaining the Indian Medal with clasp.

He passed both the Higher Hindustani and Persian test examinations. Obtained his Captaincy in 1899, and went out in the early days of the Boer War (October 1899), being present at the battles of Magersfontein, Paardeburg, Dreifontein, and was mentioned in despatches for his brilliant defence of Fawersmith, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. In was here, with the able assistance of his kinsman, now Major Philip Anstruther, that he was able, with some 200 men, to resist 600 Boers.

His plan for the defence of a small town was issued by the Military Authorities as an instructive paper to many officers. For this campaign he received the Queen’s Medal with five clasps and the King’ Medal with two clasps.

During the advance at Paardeburg he twice carried ammunition across the bullet-swept plain of some 1500 yards when his company were getting short, and later an officer of a Yorkshire regiment in hospital asked a Seaforth officer whether he had survived, as he said it was the pluckiest thing he had ever seen.

He was sent home with drafts to represent the various Highland regiments serving in South Africa to be present at King Edward’s Coronation.

In 1903 he was appointed Adjutant to the Militia Battalion until 1907, when he attained his majority and went out to India, and joined the 1st Battalion.

During November and December, 1914, he was present at two unnamed engagements in Flanders, in which the Battalion lost 30 per cent. and 15 per cent. of its numbers; he was mentioned in dispatches. Later, at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, where the losses were between 20 and 25 per cent., he got concussion from the bursting of a German shell, was invalided home for some six months, after which he was G.S.O. No 2 at Aldershot for six months.

In April he went out to command a Seaforth Battalion in France, of the physique of whose men, and their cheerfulness he was full of praise.

Colonel Algernon Stewart was married in November, 1911, to Evelyn Vivian, a daughter of Sir Arthur Vivian of Borshan, and Lady Jane Vivian, daughter of Lord Stair. He leaves issue, twin daughters, Sheila Anne and Barbara Jean, born 1915.

The following tributes to his services have been received: from their Majesties, the King and Queen – “Deeply regret the loss you and Army have sustained by the death of your husband in the service of his country. Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow.” Lord Kitchener also telegraphed to express his regret. His Brigadier, General S—-, writes in the very highest terms of the way he threw himself into the work of his new command.

Photo: #6628

Strickland CSM, Glasgow Seaforths

Company Sergeant Major Strickland

Date of Paper: 23.03.1917
Surname: Strickland
First Name(s): Not stated
Rank: Company Sergeant Major
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Glasgow

Company Sergeant Major Strickland came from Burma to join the Seaforths. He served in France for over a year, but died from wounds received in action. Later he was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s dispatches.

Photo: #6654

Thomson Alexander, Pte, Lewis Seaforths

Private Alexander Thomson

Date of Paper: 03.12.1915
Surname: Thomson
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: D (Gairloch) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Tong, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis

2399 Private Alex, Thomson, D (Gairloch) Coy., whose portrait appears above, was one of the first of the 1/4th Seaforths to receive the D.C.M. Private Thomson is a son of Mr Thomson, merchant, and Mrs Thomson, Tong Stornway, Lewis, of which place he is a native. He received his early education at Tong Public School, and afterwards attended the Nicolson Institute, Stornway. From there he proceeded to Aberdeen, where he completed his course of training as a certificated teacher, and as such he entered the service of the Glasgow School Board. Shortly after the outbreak of war he requested leave of absence to enlist and he joined the county territorial regiment. While in Aberdeen he had been a member of the 4th Gordons (T.F.), with the result that he soon completed his training, and was able to proceed with the battalion to France in November, 1914. Once at the front Private Thomson was attached to the bomb-throwing section, and in this novel form of warface he soon became an expert. He took part in the battle of Neuve Chapelle and here he distinguished himself for his coolness and courage, in recognition of which he was awarded the D.C.M. The special bit quoted in the Gazette was “for going to the rescue of a wounded member of the Black Watch and bringing him in under heavy fire”. Private Thomson was slightly wounded in this battle, but soon recovered and returned to the firing line. In September he received seven days’ furlough, which he spent with his people at Tong. On the 9th September he was honoured by the inhabitants of the island, when in the Town Hall, Stornoway, at a large meeting, over which Provost Mackenize presided, Rear-Admiral Tupper pinned the well earned decoration to Private Thomson’s breast. Pte Thomson is now back in the trenches, and took his share in the battle of Loos, through which he came without a scratch.

Photo: #6650

Thomson William, Lieut, Roxburghshire Seaforths

Lieutenant William Thomson

Date of Paper: 15.06.1917
Surname: Thomson
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Alma Cottage, St Boswells, Roxburghshire

2nd/LT. WM. THOMSON, SEAFORTHS, ST.BOSWELLS

2nd/ Lieut. Wm. Thomson, 4th Seaforths, who received his discharge in February last consequent on wounds received in action, belongs to St. Boswells, Roxburghshire, where, at Alma Cottage, he is meantime resident with his people, but expects soon to go to London. Lt. Thomson joined what may now be called “the old” 2/4th Seaforths at Bedford on 23rd December, 1915, and went out as a private to the parent battalion just after its strenuous conflict at Neuve Chapelle in March, 1915. He was one of the earliest batches of men to come home for commissioned rank.

On 12th July, 1915, he returned to France, and on 12th October in the same year, along with other two officers, he was wounded by shell fire. Indeed so serious were his wounds – the base of the skull was fractured – that grave anxiety was felt as to his chances of pulling through. He was brought home, and remained unconscious till visited at the Empire Hospital, London, by his sister in December. Twelve months after being wounded – in October last year – he reported to Ripon, and was posted to his earliest unit somewhere on the coast on the second anniversary of his joining up. In Februray, 1917, he received his discharge, and regrets greatly his inability to be once more with the boys. He sends to all his kindliest greetings and best wishes for their good luck.

Photo: #6653

Veryard A W, Pte, Essex Seaforths

Private A. W. Veryard

Date of Paper: 12.11.1915
Surname: Veryard
First Name(s): A. W.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 26, Percy Road, Leytonstone, Essex

Private A. W. Veryard, 1/4th Seaforths, wounded on 25th May, 1915, died of wounds 26th May, 1915. He was a son of Mr Veryard, 26 Percy Road, Leytonstone, Essex, and was a clerk at Somerset House. He joined the 4th Seaforths on 5th September, 1914, and went to France with the Battalion in November. He was in the firing line early in December, and went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle. He spent his 20th birthday in the trenches.

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