Seaforths WW I page 3

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Photo: #6662

Hunter Hugh, Pte, London Seaforths

Private Hugh Hunter

Paper: 12.04.1018
Surname: Hunter
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 16 Durand Gardens, London, SW19

No Headline

There is reproduced today a photograph of one of the gallant young Englishmen who in the early days of the war joined their fortunes with the Seaforths, and who made the supreme sacrifice in the first battle in which the Ross-shires took part. Pte. Hugh Hunter, No. 2000, A Coy., 1/4th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders, was the third surviving son of the late Robert Hunter, of Chester, member of the Society of Engineers, and Mrs A. M. Hunter, 16 Durand Gardens, London, SW19. Born at Whitefriars, Chester, on 21st June, 1892, and educated at Christ’s Hospital, Horsham, Sussex, where he was L./Cpl. in the Cadet Corps, he afterwards became engaged in motor engineering, and was associated with patent agents in London. At the outbreak of war he volunteered, and joined the Seaforths in September, 1914. After training at Bedford for two months, he left with the battalion for the Front in November of that year. Pte. Hunter met his death while acting as observer to Captain Truslove in the advance on Neuve Chapelle, in the early morning of 11th March, 1915, and died of his wounds before reaching the dressing station. His grave has been located in the garden of a house at Neuve Chapelle (EdgewareRoad), S.5. d. 3. 5. He was a very promising engineer and popular with his comrades in private life and in his regiment. Capt. R. W. Hunter, 12th Batt. London Regiment (“The Rangers”); 2/Lt. Malcolm Hunter, London Scottish; and Pte. Maurice M. Hunter, 9th Batt. Australian Imperial Force, are his three surviving brothers on active service.

Photo: #6643

Jenkins James T, Lieut, Burghead Seaforths

Second Lieutenant James T. Jenkins

Date of Paper: 26.10.1917
Surname: Jenkins
First Name(s): James T.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Burghead

No Headline

To-day there is reproduced the photograph of 2/Lieut. J. T. Jenkins, Seaforths, who, as already reported, was killed in the great advance of 20th September, 1917, while leading his platoon against the German lines. The deceased officer, as a Territorial, was well-known in the Reserve Battalion in England, and was very closely associated in the field and otherwise with the Ross-shires, and his death is sincerely mourned while deep sympathy goes out to his aged father, ex-Provost Jenkins, Burghead. 2/Lieut. James T. Jenkins was a partner in the well-known herring curing firm of Thomas Jenkins, Aberdeen, and elsewhere. At an early age he entered the Aberdeen University, and in due time graduated M.A. During his University course he was well-known in golfing circles, and for some time was secretary to the University Golf Club. Later on he was for a considerable time captain of the Burghead Golf Club, and was also well-known in golfing circles in Morayshire. He was trained in the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps, and ultimately got his commission in the Seaforths. He was in France about five months before his death. He was twice wounded on the morning of the 20th September, and was later on killed by a shell when making his way to the field dressing station. Lieut Jenkins was 30 years old, and unmarried.

A Private’s Tribute
Pte. Dane Anderson, Wick, batman to the late Lt. Jenkins, in a letter to Captain Paterson, harbourmaster, says: “I regret very much to tell you that I have lost my best friend and officer, Lieut Jenkins, the curer from Burghead. I was along with him when we went over. Five minutes before we made the start he was wounded in the hand and when only sixty yards ahead, when leading his company forward, he was again wounded in the left wrist. I lost touch with him, and as duty called I rushed forward to help my ‘pals’ to beat the Germans, which we did and gave it to them heavy; very likely you have seen about it in the papers. After all our objectives had been taken and held, I went back to look for Lieut. Jenkins, but was unsuccessful, and not until our Captain gave me permission to go back to our starting point did I come across him. I fairly burst out in tears to think that brave Jenkins had to make the supreme sacrifice. He was going back to the dressing station when he got killed by a shell bursting close by him: he was killed by the concussion, and his elbow was shattered. He was one of the best – a hero and a gentleman. I saw my officer carried away, and I have a note of his grave and the place where he sleeps his last sleep.”

Photo: #6652

Kirk, Padre, Dunbar Seaforths

Padre Kirk

Date of Paper : 17.05.1918
Surname: Kirk
First Name(s): Not stated
Rank: Padre
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: The Manse, Dunbar

No newspaper article

Photo: #6750

Macdonald Donald, L Corp, Lentran

Lance Corporal Donald Macdonald

Date of Paper: 12.07.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lentran

No Headline

Mrs Macdonald, Lentran, widow of the late Mr Simon Macdonald, banker, Dingwall and Inverness, received unofficially last week intimation that her only son, Lance Corporal Donald Macdonald, Seaforths, was killed in action on the Western Front on Friday, June 28, at 7.30 a.m. The information was to the effect that a shell had landed upon the post in which, as signaller, he was engaged on special duty, and that he was killed more by concussion than by direct wounds, of which there was hardly a trace. Donald Macdonald was a splendidly set up, stalwart type of Highlander. Nineteen years of age in February last, his training in the Army had greatly developed his physique as it had broadened his outlook on life. He joined the Service from Oxford University, where he was studying forestry, and at the outset his army training in the graduate stage was directed towards commissioned rank. Under new regulations it was required that he should serve abroad and hold non-commissioned rank, and, these conditions having been fulfilled, his papers for a commission were on the way to him when he fell in action. Trained in the south of Scotland, he was transferred to Cromarty, from whence he proceeded to France soon after the beginning of the German offensive. He shared in the first battles on the Flanders front, reaching the line in time to take part in the great defensive actions which successfully held for a time and place the German attempt to reach the Channel ports. Since then, with brief periods of rest, he had been in the line. “Donald,” wrote a companion, who conveyed the sad news to the mother, “was an exceptionally fine fellow, of outstanding qualities and great capabilities, and a better chum could not be found anywhere.” A native of Beauly district, Lance Corporal Macdonald was educated at Beauly, Dingwall Academy, and Inverness College. On completing his education at Inverness, and after being a short time in the Bank there, under his late father, he proceeded to Oxford, where he was making excellent progress with his studies when relieved for military service. Old for his years, he was a fine type of manly boy when a pupil at Dingwall, and among those who will mourn his loss and who feel inexpressible sympathy for the widowed mother, no one will do so more than his former school companions. Mrs Macdonald, whose husband passed away in February, 1917, has two daughters.

Date of Paper: 09.08.1918

There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Lance Corporal Donald Macdonald, Seaforths, son of the late Mr Simon Macdonald, banker, and Mrs Macdonald, Lentran who, as recently reported, was killed in action in France on June 28th last. Deceased was a promising young lad of 19 years of age, who left his College at Cambridge, where he was studying forestry, to join the colours. He had completed the period and attained the rank necessary for admission to a cadet course, the papers for which were on the way to him when he was killed. Donald Macdonald’s death is much mourned by many former school associates. He is well remembered as a pupil at Dingwall Academy.

Photo: #6613

Macfarlane, CSM, Glasgow Ex Urray

Company Sergeant Major Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name(s): Not known
Rank: Company Sergeant Major
Regiment: Home Defence Corps
Home Address: 29, Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow

4202 Private J. G. Macfarlane, No. 2 Coy., who was gassed on 25th September, is in hospital in Beds., England, and is progressing favourably. Previous to the war, Private Macfarlane, who is 18 years of age, was a seaman to trade, and was employed on one of the Donaldson liners. He was an enthusiastic territorial, and was a member of the 5th Highland Light Infantry, but he transferred to the 4th Seaforths, in which battalion his father is a company sergt.-major.

Pte. Macfarlane’s home address is 29 Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow, and sympathy is extended to his mother in her anxiety.

Company Sergeant Major Macfarlane, the father of Private Macfarlane, was 12 months in the Home Defence Corps during the Boer War. Previous to August 1914, he was a yarn storeman with Mr John Clachann, Ingram Street, Glasgow, and was employed in the G.P.O. at nights.

See entry below for details of his son J. G. Macfarlane

Photo: #6616

Macfarlane J G, Pte, Glasgow Ex Urray

Private J. G. Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Macfarlane
First Name(s): J. G.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: 29, Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow

4202 Private J. G. Macfarlane, No. 2 Coy., who was gassed on 25th September, is in hospital in Beds., England, and is progressing favourably. Previous to the war, Private Macfarlane, who is 18 years of age, was a seaman to trade, and was employed on one of the Donaldson liners. He was an enthusiastic territorial, and was a member of the 5th Highland Light Infantry, but he transferred to the 4th Seaforths, in which battalion his father is a company sergt.-major.

Pte. Macfarlane’s home address is 29 Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow, and sympathy is extended to his mother in her anxiety.

Company Sergeant Major Macfarlane, the father of Private Macfarlane, was 12 months in the Home Defence Corps during the Boer War. Previous to August 1914, he was a yarn storeman with Mr John Clachann, Ingram Street, Glasgow, and was employed in the G.P.O. at nights.

See entry above for details of his father CSM Macfarlane

Photo: #6655

Macintyre Donald, Pte, Glasgow Seaforths

Private Donald Macintyre

Date of Paper: 05.11.1915
Surname: Macintyre
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 148, Salamanca Street, Parkhead, Glasgow

3328 Private Donald Macintyre, 1/4th Seaforths, wounded 20th August, 1915, died at No. 13 General Hospital, Boulogne, 20th September, 1915, buried at Boulogne, grave number 2660. He was 29 years of age, a miner to trade, and lived at 148 Salamanca Street, Parkhead, Glasgow. He enlisted in the 4th Seaforths in March, 1915, and joined the battalion in France in June.

He is survived by a widow and four young children.

Photo: #6737

Mackenzie Alexander, Gunner, Beauly

Gunner Alexander Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 08.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Artillery
Home Address: Rheindown, Beauly

A RHEINDOWN WIDOW'S THREE SOLDIER SONS

There is reproduced today photographs of three soldier sons of Widow Mackenzie, Rheindown, Beauly.
L./Cpl. D. Mackenzie, Seaforths, the eldest son, went out with the Ross-shire battalion in 1914, and thus earned the famous Star of the First Seven Divisions. He was wounded at Aubers Ridge in May 1915. In 1916 he was invalided home. Later on he went out to Mesopotamia to join the premier Seaforth battalion, and is now somewhere on the banks of the Tigris. Before the war he was a policeman in Glasgow.

Gnr. Alex. Mackenzie, R.A., the second son, is on active service in France. Before the war he was employed with Messrs Macdonald & Co., Ltd., timber merchants, Inverness.

Pte. Ronald Mackenzie, Seaforths, is the youngest son. He is with a regular battalion in France. Before the war he was a watchmaker with Messrs Medlock & Craik, Inverness.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6740

Mackenzie D, L Corp, Beauly

Lance Corporal D. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 08.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rheindown, Beauly

A RHEINDOWN WIDOW'S THREE SOLDIER SONS

There is reproduced today photographs of three soldier sons of Widow Mackenzie, Rheindown, Beauly.
L./Cpl. D. Mackenzie, Seaforths, the eldest son, went out with the Ross-shire battalion in 1914, and thus earned the famous Star of the First Seven Divisions. He was wounded at Aubers Ridge in May 1915. In 1916 he was invalided home. Later on he went out to Mesopotamia to join the premier Seaforth battalion, and is now somewhere on the banks of the Tigris. Before the war he was a policeman in Glasgow.

Gnr. Alex. Mackenzie, R.A., the second son, is on active service in France. Before the war he was employed with Messrs Macdonald & Co., Ltd., timber merchants, Inverness.

Pte. Ronald Mackenzie, Seaforths, is the youngest son. He is with a regular battalion in France. Before the war he was a watchmaker with Messrs Medlock & Craik, Inverness.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6744

Mackenzie Ronald, Pte, Beauly

Private Ronald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 08.02.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Ronald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rheindown, Beauly

A RHEINDOWN WIDOW'S THREE SOLDIER SONS

There is reproduced today photographs of three soldier sons of Widow Mackenzie, Rheindown, Beauly.
L./Cpl. D. Mackenzie, Seaforths, the eldest son, went out with the Ross-shire battalion in 1914, and thus earned the famous Star of the First Seven Divisions. He was wounded at Aubers Ridge in May 1915. In 1916 he was invalided home. Later on he went out to Mesopotamia to join the premier Seaforth battalion, and is now somewhere on the banks of the Tigris. Before the war he was a policeman in Glasgow.

Gnr. Alex. Mackenzie, R.A., the second son, is on active service in France. Before the war he was employed with Messrs Macdonald & Co., Ltd., timber merchants, Inverness.

Pte. Ronald Mackenzie, Seaforths, is the youngest son. He is with a regular battalion in France. Before the war he was a watchmaker with Messrs Medlock & Craik, Inverness.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6748

Mackenzie Donald, Pte, Dullatur

Private Donald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 05.07.1018
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Burnside Terrace, Dullatur

SEAFORTH NOT DEAD AS REPORTED

The Rev. John Ogilvie, Cumbernauld, has received intimation through the Red Cross Society that Private Donald Mackenzie, Seaforths, who had been missing, and was officially reported to have died of wounds received in action on July 31st, 1917, is a prisoner of war at Frankfurt-on-Main, Germany, and is in good health. Although direct word has not been received from the soldier, Mr Ogilvie had always been confident that Pte. Mackenzie was alive. In his efforts to trace him, inquiries got mixed up with another Donald Mackenzie from Stornoway, who was in the same regiment, and had a number varying only in one figure. Strange to say, Donald is a prisoner in the same camp.

Private Donald Mackenzie was formerly employed at Kilsyth, Falkirk, and Grahamston railway stations, when he enlisted. He is a son of Alex. Mackenzie, railwayman, Burnside Terrace, Dullatur, and grandson of the late Alex. Mackenzie, tailor, Garve, Ross-shire. Donald’s young brother is in France in the Gordon Highlanders.

A photograph appears today.

Photo: #6632

Mackenzie Duncan, L Corp, Inverness brother of Sgt Evan Mackenzie both Seaforths

Lance Corporal Duncan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.03.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths
Home Address: 35, Charles Street, Inverness

TWO GALLANT 4th SEAFORTHS

Mrs Duncan Mackenzie (late of Holm Mills), 35 Charles Street, Inverness, has just received the Military Medal awarded to her son, Sgt. Evan Mackenzie, 4th Seaforth Highlanders, who was killed on April 11th, 1918. He went to France early in 1916 and took part in all the severe fighting, he being one of the famous 51st Division. The deceased won his honour in September 1917, and not being decorated with it before his death, his mother was asked just now to attend a military parade and have her son’s medal presented. She preferred not to attend the parade, and accordingly the medal was sent privately to her. Sergt. Mackenzie was well-known in Ross-shire, where he worked on the Pollo Estate, Delny.

A second son, L./Cpl. Duncan Mackenzie, M.M., 266569, 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths, had been awarded the same honour, and was decorated by the Duke of Connaught in 1917. He was severely wounded but recovered, and returned to France for his second time in March 1918, when, on July 20th of the same year, he was reported as “missing”. Information of any kind regarding him will be gladly received by his mother. L./Cpl. Mackenzie, before joining up, worked in the accountant’s office, Highland Railway, Inverness.

Both sons were splendid types of the true Highland soldier, and much sympathy is extended to Mrs Mackenzie in her great loss and suspense.

See entry below for details of his brother Evan Mackenzie

Photo: #6683

Mackenzie Evan, Sgt, Inverness Seaforths

Sergeant Evan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.03.1919
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Evan
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 4th Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: 35, Charles Street, Inverness

TWO GALLANT 4th SEAFORTHS

Mrs Duncan Mackenzie (late of Holm Mills), 35 Charles Street, Inverness, has just received the Military Medal awarded to her son, Sgt. Evan Mackenzie, 4th Seaforth Highlanders, who was killed on April 11th, 1918. He went to France early in 1916 and took part in all the severe fighting, he being one of the famous 51st Division. The deceased won his honour in September 1917, and not being decorated with it before his death, his mother was asked just now to attend a military parade and have her son’s medal presented. She preferred not to attend the parade, and accordingly the medal was sent privately to her. Sergt. Mackenzie was well-known in Ross-shire, where he worked on the Pollo Estate, Delny.

A second son, L./Cpl. Duncan Mackenzie, M.M., 266569, 2nd Coy., 8th Platoon, 4th Seaforths, had been awarded the same honour, and was decorated by the Duke of Connaught in 1917. He was severely wounded but recovered, and returned to France for his second time in March 1918, when, on July 20th of the same year, he was reported as “missing”. Information of any kind regarding him will be gladly received by his mother. L./Cpl. Mackenzie, before joining up, worked in the accountant’s office, Highland Railway, Inverness.

Both sons were splendid types of the true Highland soldier, and much sympathy is extended to Mrs Mackenzie in her great loss and suspense.

See entry above for details of his brother Duncan Mackenzie

Photo: #6642

Mackenzie James A, Lieut, Grantown Seaforths

Lieutenant James A. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 26.10.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): James A.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Grantown

There is reproduced today a photograph of Lt. James A. Mackenzie, Seaforths, another of those splendid Territorial officers who made the supreme sacrifice on September 20. Lt. Mackenzie is lamented both in the Morayshires, with whom he served as a ranker, and in the Ross-shires, with whom he was associated as an officer.

He was assisting his father, Mr. Mackenzie, plumber, Grantown, when the Territorials mobilised. He went with the Morayshires to France in May 1915 and, being a keen, intelligent soldier, he soon attained the rank of sergeant. He showed a fine spirit of fortitude throughout the long and nerve-wracking periods of duty in the trenches, and his companions often testified to the cheerfulness with which the brave, steadfast young man carried out every task assigned to him. His promotion was well earned, and in the sister battalion he continued to show the same soldierly qualities.

A field officer writes, “Poor Mackenzie was one of the best.” Lt. Mackenzie passed safely through the battle of Arras and was then granted a brief furlough. He returned to France. His fine moral character and manly bearing left an impress on the minds of his associates, many of whom will recall the happier days when he was the mainstay of local football and a popular figure in athletic circles.

In their great sorrow Mr and Mrs Mackenzie and family have the sympathy of a wide community.
The officer commanding Lieut. Mackenzie’s company (Capt. Ray Macdonald), wrote to his parents as follows: “I desire to express to you how grieved everyone left in the company and battalion is to have lost one of the bravest and most competent officers we have ever had. He took my company into action on the morning of 20th September. I was on another job, but was with him shortly before he went over the top. He was very cheery and confident. He was killed just as our first objective was being taken. His death was caused by a piece of shell which struck him on the forehead, killing him instantaneously. I personally saw to the burial of your son and other officers, who lie side by side in a cemetery within the ground they won for us by terrible fighting and paid for with their lives.”

Photo: #7415

Mackenzie J, Pte, Kirkintilloch

Private John Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 25.08.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Seaforths
Home Address: Novar, Kirkintilloch

KIRKINTILLOCH SEAFORTH DIES IN INDIA

Mr Alex. Mackenzie, clothier, Novar, Kirkintilloch, received official intimation that his eldest son, Private John Mackenzie, 1st Seaforth Highlanders, had died of enteric fever in Cumballa Hospital, Bombay. Private Mackenzie joined the Seaforths on 2nd August 1915, and, after training at Cromarty, proceeded to Mesopotamia in April last, having a few days’ furlough before leaving. He occupied the rank of signaller, and also qualified well up in musketry. Fully a fortnight ago word was received that he was dangerously ill from heat stroke, but later news was more reassuring. He was taken to India, and there the fever developed which carried him off. He was 22 years of age.

A younger brother, William, is on service as a driver in the Royal Engineers, and is at present in Essex. John Mackenzie was well and favourably known in Kirkintilloch. He worked for some years with his father, and at the time of his enlistment was enlarging his experience with Messrs J. & J. Borland Bros., the well-known city tailors of West George Street, Glasgow. In virtue of being the son of a Mason, he joined the “Athole” Lodge at the age of 18, and for two years had filled the office of secretary. He was also for a year or two secretary of the Guild of St David’s Parish Church, and had been connected with the YMCA since his boyhood. He took early to golf, in which he attained such proficiency that he was reckoned to be the leading player of the Kirkintilloch Club, and stood plus 2 on the handicap list. With his father, who was a native of Evanton, he took part frequently in national competitions, and for many years in succession spent his holidays in the Novar district. He was well-known in golfing circles in the North and in Dingwall. His manner was exceptionally open and frank, and formed for him a large circle of friends, who now learn of his death with deep regret. Much sympathy is felt for his father and mother in their bereavement.

Photo: #6649

Mackenzie William Sinclair, Lieut, St Andrews Seaforths

Lieutenant William Sinclair Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.09.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): William Sinclair
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Killock Cottage, Strathkinness, St. Andrews

We reproduce above the photograph of the late Lieut. William Sinclair Mackenzie, D.S.O., a gallant Seaforth Highlander, who gave his life for his country on April 21st, 1917, when he was killed in action. Lieut. Mackenzie was the youngest son of Mr Angus Mackenzie, Well Brae, Stanley, Perthshire, and was born at Mains of Craig Isla, Glen Isla, Perthshire, on 10th May, 1887. No less than three time he was recommended on the field of battle. In the first instance he was promoted Second Lieutenant, secondly he was awarded the D.S.O., and on 14th April last he was mentioned in Sir Stanley Maude’s dispatches. A bold and intrepid soldier, he was an all-round fine fellow – one of nature’s gentlemen. His widow, to whom deep sympathy is extended, resides at Killock Cottage, Strathkinness, St. Andrews. The photograph reproduced above shows Lt. Mackenzie prior to receiving his commission.

By special request we reproduce In Memoriam verses written on the late Lieut. Mackenzie, and which we published three months ago. It is as follows:

He sleeps afar, and we who loved him well,
No flower upon his resting place can lay;
They buried him not far from where he fell –
Another soldier stricken in the fray.
Although our eyes so fain the spot would see,
And o’er it tears of true affection shed:
Alas! too well we know it cannot be,
The distant field of battle holds our dead.
Words spoken ere he left we oft recall,
For sorrow’s ache they seem to soothe and still;
He said, “Even if in death my body fall
No enemy has power my soul to kill.”
Oh, gallant heart! No knight of old renown
Who fought for truth and justice to the end,
A better, purer life than thine laid down –
Fond husband, son, and brother; faithful friend.
He loved his native land, its hills and dales
Oft called to him when he was far away;
His poet’s mind fed on its glorious tales
Before he joined the ranks of Caber Feidh.
Modest in mien, yet bravest of the brave,
He cannot wear the honours he has won;
But as he sleeps within his far-off grave
His country may be proud to call him son.
In hearts that loved him he can never die,
Whilst memory lasts he’ll hold a sacred place;
The winning smile, the merry beaming eye,
The sunny nature shining in his face.
Fondly remembered. Though the distant grave
May hold his body, that brave soul set free;
When he his life for others freely gave,
Passed on to fill a higher destiny.

Rachel S. Robertson

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