Seaforths WW I page 2

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Photo: #6670

Deane Reginald S, Pte, Leeds Seaforths

Private Reginald S. Deane

Date of Paper: 18.04.1919
Surname: Deane
First Name(s): Reginald S.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: 34 Wellclose Mount, Leeds

PTE. R. S. DEANE, 4th SEAFORTHS

Pte. Reginald S. Deane, 4th Seaforths, whose portrait is reproduced, is one of many English lads who were so proud to wear the Seaforth colours. Enlisting at Leeds in 1915, where he resided at 34 Wellclose Mount, he did his training at Ripon, and proceeded to France on 16th March, 1916. After a period at the famous (or infamous) “bull ring” at Etaples, he joined the 4th at Roclincourt, where “Fritz” was generally busy with his “Minnies” and mines. Private Deane was at High Wood on the Somme, Armentiers, Plug Street, Hooplines Courcellette, and Beaumont Hamel, where the 51st Division distinguished itself. He took in the Arras offensive and on 19th April, 1917, he was severely wounded. He was removed to England where it was found that he had two wounds on the left knee, one on the right leg from the knee to the hip, one on the thigh 7ins. long, and one on the leg above the ankle. The result is that the right leg is about 2ins. short. A useless finger is also a souvenir of the battle. He was ultimately discharged on the 20th September, 1918. Pte Deane experienced good treatment in the hospitals, while, as regards his time in France, he writes: “I had not a bad time considering we were in a state of war.”

Photo: #6684

Dennis G H, Sgt, London Seaforths

Sergeant G. H. Dennis

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Dennis
First Name(s): G. H.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: (Brahan) Coy., Seaforths
Home Address: 11, Rutland Gardens, Harringay, London.

No Headline

Dennis, Sergt. G., 2430, H (Brahan) Coy., wounded 10th March, died of wounds 11th March,1915. Engaged in insurance. Went out with first draft 19th Feb., 1915. Survived by widow, 11, Rutland Gardens, Harringay London.

Photo: #7414

Dent Paxton M, Private,

Private Paxton M. Dent

Date of Paper: 05.05.1916
Surname: Dent
First Name(s): Paxton M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Hill Lodge, Enfield

THE LATE PRIVATE P. M. DENT

2083 Private Paxton M. Dent, No 2 Company, 1/4th Seaforths, killed in action on April 28th, 1915, whose portrait is reproduced, was the fourth surviving son of Mr J. M. Dent, publisher, Hill Lodge Enfield. When war broke out he gave up his position in the firm, and joined the Seaforth Highlanders as a private. Aged 24 years, deceased was educated at Mill Hill School, and Worcester College, Oxford. He was of a loving and energetic disposition. He worked hard in his spare time with the Boy Scouts in Enfield, and on Sunday afternoons he played the played the piano or organ for the Sunday School children of St Paul’s Presbyterian Church, of which he was a member.
Private Dent was the elder son of J. M. Dent’s second marriage, and his brother, Sergt. Austen C. Dent, R.A.M.C., when he heard of his death, wrote home from Gallipoli: “I don’t know what my life will be without dear old Pat.” But Austen only survived his brother three months. He was wounded on his 23rd birthday, July 19th, and died next day.

Photo: #6619

Downie-Leslie E V, 2 Lieut, London Seaforths

Second Lieutenant E. V. Downie-Leslie

Date of Paper: 11.5.1917
Surname: Downie-Leslie
First Name(s): E. V.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Hayton, Westbury Road, Woodside Park, London N12.

THE LATE 2/LT. DOWNIE-LESLIE

2/Lt. E. V. Downie-Leslie, Seaforths, who was killed at Arras on the 9th April was the youngest son of the late Robert Downie-Leslie, advocate in Aberdeen, and Mrs Downie-Leslie, Hayton, Westbury Road, Woodside Park, London, N12. He was educated at Clifton Bank, St Andrews, and Blundell’s, Devonshire. He received his commission in July [obliterated] year, and went to France in J[obliterated]. He was in his 20th year [obliterated] … was training …and was … dear … [remainder obliterated].

Photo: #6679

Ellington V S, Pte, Edinburgh Seaforths

Private V.S. Ellington

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Ellington
First Name(s): V. S.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rosetta, Dalkeith St, Joppa, Edinburgh.

No Headline

Mrs Ellington, Rosetta, Dalkeith Street, Joppa, Edinburgh, will be glad to receive any information concerning her husband, 266930, Private V.S. Ellington, 6th Platoon, B. Co. Seaforths (Service), B.E.F., reported missing on August 22nd, 1917, apparently under circumstances similar to those stated in another paragraph published to-day enquiring about another Seaforth named Anderson.
Pte. Ellington had been out about five months, and was twice slightly wounded.

Readers can communicate direct with Mrs Ellington or with the Editor.

Photo: #6665

Galbraith J, Pte, Seaforths

Private J. Galbraith

Date of Paper: 11.02.1916
Surname: Galbraith
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:

No Headline

No entry

No photo available

Sergeant J. G. Gardiner

Date of Paper: 13.09.1918
Surname: Gardiner
First Name(s): J G
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Dundee

War Honours to Seaforths DCM Incidents of Battle 202664 Sgt J G Gardiner, MM, Dundee

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In severe fighting and many rearguard actions, the great gallantry displayed by this NCO was a conspicuous example to the men of his company, of which he took charge when all the officers were either killed or wounded, leading them many times against superior numbers of the enemy. While the wounded of another battalion were being evacuated from a position from which our troops were being withdrawn he remained behind, and by his conduct enabled them to be safely removed.

Photo: #6636

Grace William, L Corp, Kent Seaforths

Lance Corporal William Grace

Date of Paper: 10.12.1915
Surname: Grace
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 36, St Augustine’s Road, Belvedere, Kent.

No Headline

The above is a photo of 2108 Lance Corporal William Grace, No. 2 Company, who was killed in action on 26th May, 1915. The deceased, who only celebrated his coming of age in France on 12th December last, belonged to Kent, where he resided at 36 St Augustine’s Road, Belvedere. On 4th June his people received letters from the deceased which he wrote the night before he was killed, and in which he told of his promotion to Lance Corporal. Grace was very proud of his regiment, and he was very popular with the men of No. 2 Coy., to which he belonged. He joined the battalion in September 1914, and after two months training proceeded to France with the battalion in November 1914. With the exception of two “leaves” of 24 hours’ duration he was with the battalion from the moment he enlisted till the day he was killed. He lies beside many of his comrades in the Military Cemetery at Neuve Chapelle.

Rev. J. Macleod, chaplain, in a letter to his home, writes: “He was one of our bravest [text missing] son was a dear and brave lad; he was a favourite among us, and we deeply regret his death.”
An interesting letter with regard to the death of Lance Corpl. Grace was received by the parents from Private Fred Humphreys, 1/4th Seaforths. This we published at the time, and we offer no apology for reproducing it. Private Humphreys writes: “Willie Grace was killed on the 26th. I was in the telephone dug-out in the trench about 15 yards away at the time. Apparently two or three of them were having a few shots at a sniper at the time. I think the last thing he said was to a fellow just by him, ‘Watch where this one goes to’ and as he fired he fell back dead with a bullet through his head. Poor chap, I was ever so sorry. He was a jolly plucky fellow, and has done some very good things while he was with us. By the way, he had just been promoted lance corporal in C Company, and was quite happy about it. He told me during the night previous, and of course I congratulated him and told him I was jolly glad he had got his stripe. I knew he was keen. His body was brought away from the trenches, and I believe has been buried in a military cemetery at Vielle Chapelle. One thing I would like to tell you about him. That is the splendid way in which he behaved during our attack in the battle of Aubers Ridge, on the 9th. He was one of the five out of forty that left the trench in our platoon that returned. After the rush, and it was realised how hopeless it was to push ahead at the time, and lying out in ‘No man’s land’ (between ours and the German trenches) he helped a badly wounded fellow into a shell-hole, where he stuck by him all day and did all he could for him, under a hail of shells which you [text missing].

Photo: #6517

Grant F P, L Corp, Salisbury Ex Strathpeffer

Lance Corporal F. P. Grant

Date of Paper: 13.12.1918
Surname: Grant
First Name(s): F. P.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: The Rest, Oldstock, Salisbury

FORMER STRATHPEFFER 1/4th SEAFORTH

A photo is reproduced today of Lance Corporal F. P. Grant, 1/4th Seaforths, a son of Mr Joseph Grant, The Rest, Oldstock, Salisbury, and, before joining up at mobilisation, chauffeur to Dr Kaye, Eaglestone, Strathpeffer. Lance Corporal Grant is now at Glencorse. Trained at Bedford with the battalion, he went to France in November 1914, went through the trench warfare for the first weary and trying winter of war in the mud, and, in March 1915, fought at Neuve Chapelle, where he was wounded in the head and the leg. He was sent to England and was treated in various hospitals. In September following he returned to the Western Front, and fought with the 51st Division at Beaumont Hamel, where he was again wounded. He took part in the fighting at Arras in 1917, and was wounded at the Vimy Ridge. In the great battle at Cambrai in November following he was once more in the line, but later on developed severe inflammation in the legs and thighs and was returned to Blighty. He was a considerable time in the hospitals, but ultimately, unfit for overseas service, was posted to the 4th (Res.) Seaforths at Ripon, and from there to Glencorse. Since then he has been engaged more or less on the instructional staff of the unit. L/Cpl. Grant is 26 years of age.
He has one brother serving in India, L/Sergt. E. C. Grant, M.T., A.S.C.

Another brother, Pte. Joseph Grant, Black Watch, was killed at Aubers Ridge in 1915, aged 19 years.

Photo: #6668

Hamilton Peter, Pte, Glasgow Seaforths

Private Peter Hamilton

Date of Paper: 19.02.1915
Surname: Hamilton
First Name(s): Peter
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforth
Home Address: 137, Rose Street, South Side, Glasgow

No Headline

Private Peter Hamilton (2340), D Company, 4th Seaforths, who was killed by a sniper behind the trenches on the 4th inst., was a Clydesdale man. He joined the 4th Seaforths from Glasgow on 20th September, and was trained at Dingwall, leaving here with the last draft that went to Bedford a day or two before the Battalion moved off to France.

As stated elsewhere, deceased met his death by exposing himself without due precautions when out of the billet gathering vegetables.

Deceased resided at 137 Rose Street, South Side, Glasgow, with his mother, who, in addition to a letter from a companion, has received a very sympathetic message from Captain Gilbert W. Fraser (son of Mr John Fraser, ironmonger, Dingwall). Captain Fraser says that Private Hamilton was a great favourite in the company and in the battalion. He was buried with all honours in a quiet little churchyard, under the shadow of a church much ruined by German fire and shells, and not far behind the firing line, being laid to rest beside another fallen comrade.

The Rev. John Macleod, C.T. (minister of Urray Free Church, Ross-shire), conducted a touching service at the graveside. The men of the Battalion were present, as also were Colonel D. Mason Macfarlane, commanding

No photo available

Sergeant James Hay

Date of Paper: 12.05.1918
Surname: Hay
First Name(s): James
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Not specified

No Headline

No entry recorded, apart from “wounded”

Photo: #6661

Heath Harry H, Pte, Manchester Seaforths

Private Harry H. Heath

Date of Paper: 01.10.1915
Surname: Heath
First Name(s): Harry H.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 9, Brighton Road, C-on-M, Manchester

No Headline

As will be seen from our list of casualties published today, 2854 Private Harry H. Heath, No. 1 Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, was killed in action on 17th August. Deceased, whose photograph we reproduce above, was the son of Mr and Mrs J. Heath, 9 Brighton Road, C-on-M, Manchester. On 4th January last he reached his majority, and ten days later he joined the 4th Seaforth Highlanders, who were training at Bedford. He proceeded to France with a draft in April, and was through the battle of Festubert without being hit. Previous to his connecting himself with the 4th Seaforths he was employed by a fancy slipper manufacturer in Manchester. He was well liked by his fellow workers and popular with his mates in the trenches. An affectionate and considerate son, the loss to his parents is irreparable, and deep sympathy is extended to them by the men at the front and by many people in Ross-shire, who know what it is to suffer.

Photo: #6686

Henderson John Harry, Sgt, Leeds Seaforths

Sergeant John Harry Henderson

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: Henderson
First Name(s): John Harry
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 3/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 26, Potternewton Lane, Leeds

THE LATE SGT. JOHN H. HENDERSON, SEAFORTHS

Sergeant John Harry Henderson, Seaforths, who was killed in action in France on Easter Monday, was a native of Lockerbie, and went to Leeds about five years ago, acting as police constable in Chapeltown district, and resided at 26 Potternewton Lane, Leeds. Mr W. Macdonald, Leeds, writes: “I met Mr J. H. Henderson on the first Sabbath he came to our city. He came to Trinity Presbyterian Church, where he worshipped regularly. I was greatly impressed by his quiet and unassuming manner. He enlisted in the 3/4th Seaforths towards the end of May 1915, and was so ardent a supporter of the Seaforths that 16 other lads from Chapel Allerton, Leeds, enlisted in that famous unit at the same period, and went North to Fort George along with him. Sergt. Henderson was very popular, not only with his men, but with everyone he came in contact.” Much sympathy is felt by his many friends in Leeds for his mother and sisters in the great loss they have sustained by the death of so brave and gallant a son and brother.

His mother resides at Lockerbie, Dumfries-shire. A photograph appears today.

Photo: #6625

Henderson L D, Capt, Bedfordshire Seaforths

Captain L D. Henderson

Date of Paper: 16.06.1916
Surname: Henderson
First Name(s): L. D.
Rank: Captain
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Dunstable, Bedfordshire

CAPTAIN HENDERSON

Captain L D. Henderson, Seaforth Highlanders, awarded the Military Cross on the King’s birthday, belongs to Dunstable, Bedfordshire, where he was educated at the Grammar School. As his name implies, he is of Scottish descent. A highly efficient and popular officer, he joined the battalion from the London Scottish after the outbreak of war, and went out to France in November 1914. He is one of three or possibly four officers remaining with the Battalion who marched out of Bedford when it proceeded overseas.

A fellow officer writes: “Captain L. D. Henderson, Seaforth Highlanders, has just received the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in the field, and all who know Capt. Henderson will rejoice over the fact. Capt. Henderson, known to his friends as ‘Jock’, is the most popular officer in the Battalion. He came from the London Scottish at the outbreak of war, and went to France in November 5th 1914. He went through all the hardships of that first winter in the trenches, was at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, March 1915, where, for good work, he was promoted Captain. It was he who built the now famous ‘Duck’s Bill’ under heavy fire. He has been through May 9th, 1915, September 25th, and October 13th ‘shows’, in fact he has never left the Battalion since joining, and has endeared himself to every officer and man who served under him. He is still with the Battalion. May he one day come home with the Battalion after gaining further honours. Good old Jock.”

Photo: #6623

Hogg C G, Capt, Elgin Seaforths

Captain C. G. Hogg

Paper: 16.03.1917
Surname: Hogg
First Name(s): C. G.
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Elgin

No Headline

Second-Lieiut. David A. Hogg, Highland Light Infantry, youngest son of Mr A Hogg, road surveyor, Elgin, and Mrs Hogg, who, as we reported a fortnight ago, was killed in action on Feb. 9th, enlisted in the autumn of 1915 in the Sportsmen’s Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, and in that unit he rose to the tank of sergeant. For distinguished service during the attack of Delville Wood he received a commission, and at the end of several months’ training in France was gazetted to the H.L.I., only taking up his new duties on January 13, when he returned to the front after a short visit home. Lieut. Hogg served his apprenticeship as an architect in the office of Mr C. C. Doig, Elgin, and at the time of his enlistment was road surveyor of the county of Zetland. A lover of games, he was well known in cricket and football fields, while his musical abilities were often at the disposal of concerts and social gatherings.

We also reproduce a photo of Captain C. G. Hogg, Seaforths, who recently received an appointment as a surveyor of roads in France. Captain Hogg is well-known in Ross-shire, where he was road surveyor to the Mid Ross District Committee. A keen Territorial, he was in command of the Brahan Company when he was mobilised.

See entry below for details of his brother David A. Hogg

Photo: #6618

Hogg David A, 2 Lieut, Elgin Highland Light Infantry

Second Lieutenant David A. Hogg

Paper: 16.03.1917
Surname: Hogg
First Name(s): David A.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Elgin

No Headline

Second-Lieut. David A. Hogg, Highland Light Infantry, youngest son of Mr A Hogg, road surveyor, Elgin, and Mrs Hogg, who, as we reported a fortnight ago, was killed in action on Feb. 9th, enlisted in the autumn of 1915 in the Sportsmen’s Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, and in that unit he rose to the tank of sergeant. For distinguished service during the attack of Delville Wood he received a commission, and at the end of several months’ training in France was gazetted to the H.L.I., only taking up his new duties on January 13, when he returned to the front after a short visit home. Lieut. Hogg served his apprenticeship as an architect in the office of Mr C. C. Doig, Elgin, and at the time of his enlistment was road surveyor of the county of Zetland. A lover of games, he was well known in cricket and football fields, while his musical abilities were often at the disposal of concerts and social gatherings.

We also reproduce a photo of Captain C. G. Hogg, Seaforths, who recently received an appointment as a surveyor of roads in France. Captain Hogg is well-known in Ross-shire, where he was road surveyor to the Mid Ross District Committee. A keen Territorial, he was in command of the Brahan Company when he was mobilised.

See entry above for details of his brother C. G. Hogg

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