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Photo: #6659

Macnair H, Pte, Glasgow Scots Guards Ex Seaforths

Private H. Macnair

Date of Paper: 09.02.1917
Surname: Macnair
First Name(s): H.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Scots Guards
Home Address: Glasgow

A ROSS-SHIRE SCOTS GUARD

Pte. H. Macnair, an old 4th Seaforth, joined the Scots Guards on mobilisation. In civil life he was a policeman in Glasgow. He is still at the front. His photograph appears above.

Photo: #6738

Macrae Ewan, Gunner, Beauly

Gunner Ewen Macrae

Paper: 25.10.1918
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Ewen
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Ardochy, Beauly

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF BEAULY

As recently reported, Mrs Macrae, Ardochy, Beauly, lost the youngest of her three sons which she had serving with the Army, portraits of all of whom appear today.

The late Private Roderick Macrae, Scots Guards, was 25 years of age, and a fine specimen of a man and a Guardsman. He was a member of the Edinburgh Constabulary before joining the Forces, and he had seen much stiff fighting with the famous Division to which he belonged. The Guards are a crack Corps. They demand from every man a standard of efficiency which exacts most rigorous training, and requires high courage and discipline. That a finely human spirit pervades all ranks is borne out by the letters of sympathy which have been received by Mrs Macrae, conveying the sad intelligence and offering kindly consolation. A sister in No. 19 Casualty Clearing Station, intimating that Corpl. Macrae had succumbed to mustard gas poisoning on the 19th September, mentions that Pte. Macrae did not know the end was so near. “He was talking of his home,” she says, “and sent his love to you. He did not suffer much pain.”

His company officer, Capt. Dundas, says, “I find it difficult to express my sorrow at this cruel blow to you, for he was one of my best men, and a true Scots Guardsman, if ever there was one. He had been out long enough to show what a real loss his death is to the company.” “His comrades would like to say (the Chaplain writes) how much they will miss him, and they ask me to convey to you their deep and respectful sympathy with you in your great sorrow. Surely with the lad all is well. And we pray you may find consolation in the thought of his noble gift of himself, that men, and women, and children, after him may walk in righteousness and love all the days of their life.” A copy of the battalion funeral service accompanied that letter.

Gunner Ewen Macrae, the eldest son, is 39 years of age. A member of the Derbyshire Constabulary from 1901, he joined the Army early in 1915, and has been on the Western Front, and has been the witness of much of the German methods, for the last three years. Excepting when twice on leave – he visited his old home in the North the other week – he has not been off duty since he first crossed the Channel. Married, his wife resides in Derbyshire.

Private William Macrae, the second son, is 35 years of age. He served nine years in the Territorial Force, and retired in 1913. In 1915 he joined the Lovat Scouts, and when his regiment moved off to the East he went with them. Subsequently he saw service at Suvla Bay, and in fact formed part of the rearguard at the famous evacuation. In a machine gun section, he was among the last to leave this sector of the Peninsula. Subsequently he was transferred to Egypt, and saw much work in the Desert before proceeding to Salonica, where he was attached to a line regiment. Later, some time last year, he came to the Western Front, and about two months ago had his first leave since 1915. The Turk, he agrees with most men from the East, is a fine soldier and a good shot, qualities which he is loth to attribute to the Bulgar. Even after experiences on the Western Front, Pte. Macrae still speaks of the greater hardships which men in the East were called upon to sustain. Before joining the Army, Pte. Macrae assisted his mother on the farm of Ardochy.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6743

Macrae Roderick, Pte, Beauly

Private Roderick Macrae

Paper: 25.10.1918
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Scots Guards
Home Address: Ardochy, Beauly

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF BEAULY

As recently reported, Mrs Macrae, Ardochy, Beauly, lost the youngest of her three sons which she had serving with the Army, portraits of all of whom appear today.

The late Private Roderick Macrae, Scots Guards, was 25 years of age, and a fine specimen of a man and a Guardsman. He was a member of the Edinburgh Constabulary before joining the Forces, and he had seen much stiff fighting with the famous Division to which he belonged. The Guards are a crack Corps. They demand from every man a standard of efficiency which exacts most rigorous training, and requires high courage and discipline. That a finely human spirit pervades all ranks is borne out by the letters of sympathy which have been received by Mrs Macrae, conveying the sad intelligence and offering kindly consolation. A sister in No. 19 Casualty Clearing Station, intimating that Corpl. Macrae had succumbed to mustard gas poisoning on the 19th September, mentions that Pte. Macrae did not know the end was so near. “He was talking of his home,” she says, “and sent his love to you. He did not suffer much pain.”

His company officer, Capt. Dundas, says, “I find it difficult to express my sorrow at this cruel blow to you, for he was one of my best men, and a true Scots Guardsman, if ever there was one. He had been out long enough to show what a real loss his death is to the company.” “His comrades would like to say (the Chaplain writes) how much they will miss him, and they ask me to convey to you their deep and respectful sympathy with you in your great sorrow. Surely with the lad all is well. And we pray you may find consolation in the thought of his noble gift of himself, that men, and women, and children, after him may walk in righteousness and love all the days of their life.” A copy of the battalion funeral service accompanied that letter.

Gunner Ewen Macrae, the eldest son, is 39 years of age. A member of the Derbyshire Constabulary from 1901, he joined the Army early in 1915, and has been on the Western Front, and has been the witness of much of the German methods, for the last three years. Excepting when twice on leave – he visited his old home in the North the other week – he has not been off duty since he first crossed the Channel. Married, his wife resides in Derbyshire.

Private William Macrae, the second son, is 35 years of age. He served nine years in the Territorial Force, and retired in 1913. In 1915 he joined the Lovat Scouts, and when his regiment moved off to the East he went with them. Subsequently he saw service at Suvla Bay, and in fact formed part of the rearguard at the famous evacuation. In a machine gun section, he was among the last to leave this sector of the Peninsula. Subsequently he was transferred to Egypt, and saw much work in the Desert before proceeding to Salonica, where he was attached to a line regiment. Later, some time last year, he came to the Western Front, and about two months ago had his first leave since 1915. The Turk, he agrees with most men from the East, is a fine soldier and a good shot, qualities which he is loth to attribute to the Bulgar. Even after experiences on the Western Front, Pte. Macrae still speaks of the greater hardships which men in the East were called upon to sustain. Before joining the Army, Pte. Macrae assisted his mother on the farm of Ardochy.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6745

Macrae William, Pte, Beauly

Private william Macrae

Paper: 25.10.1918
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Ardochy, Beauly

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF BEAULY

As recently reported, Mrs Macrae, Ardochy, Beauly, lost the youngest of her three sons which she had serving with the Army, portraits of all of whom appear today.

The late Private Roderick Macrae, Scots Guards, was 25 years of age, and a fine specimen of a man and a Guardsman. He was a member of the Edinburgh Constabulary before joining the Forces, and he had seen much stiff fighting with the famous Division to which he belonged. The Guards are a crack Corps. They demand from every man a standard of efficiency which exacts most rigorous training, and requires high courage and discipline. That a finely human spirit pervades all ranks is borne out by the letters of sympathy which have been received by Mrs Macrae, conveying the sad intelligence and offering kindly consolation. A sister in No. 19 Casualty Clearing Station, intimating that Corpl. Macrae had succumbed to mustard gas poisoning on the 19th September, mentions that Pte. Macrae did not know the end was so near. “He was talking of his home,” she says, “and sent his love to you. He did not suffer much pain.”

His company officer, Capt. Dundas, says, “I find it difficult to express my sorrow at this cruel blow to you, for he was one of my best men, and a true Scots Guardsman, if ever there was one. He had been out long enough to show what a real loss his death is to the company.” “His comrades would like to say (the Chaplain writes) how much they will miss him, and they ask me to convey to you their deep and respectful sympathy with you in your great sorrow. Surely with the lad all is well. And we pray you may find consolation in the thought of his noble gift of himself, that men, and women, and children, after him may walk in righteousness and love all the days of their life.” A copy of the battalion funeral service accompanied that letter.

Gunner Ewen Macrae, the eldest son, is 39 years of age. A member of the Derbyshire Constabulary from 1901, he joined the Army early in 1915, and has been on the Western Front, and has been the witness of much of the German methods, for the last three years. Excepting when twice on leave – he visited his old home in the North the other week – he has not been off duty since he first crossed the Channel. Married, his wife resides in Derbyshire.

Private William Macrae, the second son, is 35 years of age. He served nine years in the Territorial Force, and retired in 1913. In 1915 he joined the Lovat Scouts, and when his regiment moved off to the East he went with them. Subsequently he saw service at Suvla Bay, and in fact formed part of the rearguard at the famous evacuation. In a machine gun section, he was among the last to leave this sector of the Peninsula. Subsequently he was transferred to Egypt, and saw much work in the Desert before proceeding to Salonica, where he was attached to a line regiment. Later, some time last year, he came to the Western Front, and about two months ago had his first leave since 1915. The Turk, he agrees with most men from the East, is a fine soldier and a good shot, qualities which he is loth to attribute to the Bulgar. Even after experiences on the Western Front, Pte. Macrae still speaks of the greater hardships which men in the East were called upon to sustain. Before joining the Army, Pte. Macrae assisted his mother on the farm of Ardochy.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6706

Mason-Macfarlane Quentin, Col, Edinburgh

Colonel Quentin Mason-Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 28.03.1919
Surname: Mason-Macfarlane
First Name(s): Quentin
Rank: Colonel
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: North British Hotel Edinburgh ?

[Obliterated} to take his battalion ……… Quentin and after ……… seriously ill and had to ….. On recovering he was appointed ……. Major to the C.R.A. of ……. During August 1918 he was awarded a second bar to his Military Medal for carrying a wounded stretcher bearer off under machine gun fire. In September, 1918, General Lecky was appointed Inspector General of R.H. and R.F. Artillery in India and he made Major Mason-Macfarlane his staff officer. Shortly before sailing for India, Major Mason-Macfarlane married Miss Islay Pitman, youngest daughter of Mr F. I. Pitman of Braymead, Bray

Major Mason-Macfarlane is a keen [remainder missing].

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6721

Mason-Macfarlane Noel, Major, Edinburgh

Major Noel Mason-Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 28.03.1919
Surname: Mason-Macfarlane
First Name(s): Noel
Rank: Major
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: North British Hotel, Edinburgh ?

[Obliterated} to take his battalion ……… Quentin and after ……… seriously ill and had to ….. On recovering he was appointed ……. Major to the C.R.A. of ……. During August 1918 he was awarded a second bar to his Military Medal for carrying a wounded stretcher bearer off under machine gun fire. In September, 1918, General Lecky was appointed Inspector General of R.H. and R.F. Artillery in India and he made Major Mason-Macfarlane his staff officer. Shortly before sailing for India, Major Mason-Macfarlane married Miss Islay Pitman, youngest daughter of Mr F. I. Pitman of Braymead, Bray

Major Mason-Macfarlane is a keen [remainder missing].

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6705

Mason-Macfarlane W C, Capt, Edinburgh

Captain W.C. Mason-Macfarlane

Date of Paper: 28.03.1919
Surname: Mason-Macfarlane
First Name(s): W. C.
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: North British Hotel, Edinburgh?.

[Obliterated} to take his battalion ……… Quentin and after ……… seriously ill and had to ….. On recovering he was appointed ……. Major to the C.R.A. of ……. During August 1918 he was awarded a second bar to his Military Medal for carrying a wounded stretcher bearer off under machine gun fire. In September, 1918, General Lecky was appointed Inspector General of R.H. and R.F. Artillery in India and he made Major Mason-Macfarlane his staff officer. Shortly before sailing for India, Major Mason-Macfarlane married Miss Islay Pitman, youngest daughter of Mr F. I. Pitman of Braymead, Bray

Major Mason-Macfarlane is a keen [remainder missing].

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6724

Morrison Alick, Pte, Canada Ex Lewis

Private Alick Morrison

Date of Paper: 03.11.1916
Surname: Morrison
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Vancouver Battalion
Home Address: Canada (formerly Morvig, Lochs, Lewis)

LOCHS CANADIAN KILLED

Private Alick Morrison, Vancouver Battalion, Canadian Contingent, killed on 16th September, 1916, was aged 42 years, and belonged to Morvig, Lochs, Lewis. He had seen service in India and Africa.
A photograph of Private Morrison appears in these columns..

Photo: #6717

Munro Robert, L Corp, Bonar Bridge Cameron Highlanders

Lance Corporal Robert Munro

Date of Paper: 29.09.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Bonar Bridge

THE LATE LANCE CORPORAL ROBERT MUNRO, BONAR BRIDGE

The above is a photograph of Lance-Corporal Robert Munro, the only son of Mr George Munro, draper, Bonar Bridge, killed in France in July. After finishing his education in Bonar Bridge School – in the secondary department – he served his apprenticeship as a civil engineer in Inverness. He then got a lucrative appointment as engineer in South America, where he worked for about five years. When the war broke out he resigned, returned to this country at his own expense, and joined the Cameron Highlanders. After a few months training in Invergordon, he was sent to France, where he was somewhat seriously wounded in the early summer of 1915. After some time in a French hospital he was taken to this country to a hospital in England, and then to Aberdeen, where he underwent an operation. Having recovered, he rejoined the Camerons at Invergordon. In the spring of this year he was sent to France again. On the fatal night in July he was slightly wounded in the trenches and, though urged to retire to the dressing station, brave soldier as he was, he refused. In less than two hours after he was instantaneously killed by a shell which burst near him. That night he was buried by his comrades, who greatly lamented the death of one of the bravest of soldiers, who willingly fought and died for his country.

No photo available

Despatch Rider Adam Rae

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Rae
First Name(s): Adam
Rank: Despatch Rider
Regiment: Not known
Home Address: Castle Douglas

2/Lt. James Rae, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, who was reported missing from October 4th, 1917, is now posted as “killed in action or died of wounds on or shortly after that date, and buried November 17, 1917”. He was the eldest son of the late Provost Rae of Castle Douglas, and was in business for himself in Huddersfield. The family is connected by marriage with Ross-shire, a sister being the wife of Dr Gair, Johnstone, who is a nephew of Mr Gair, Alness. Joining the Artists’ Rifles O.T.C. in November, 1916, he was transferred to Gailes Cadet School the following month, and in April, 1917, was gazetted to the Seaforths. After being stationed at Cromarty for a short time, he left in June for France, where he served with the 2nd Seaforths till the end came. Lt. Rae married in April, 1913, Winifred, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs Furness of Monkswood, Kirkstall, Leeds, who survives him. At the time he was posted as missing the Chaplain wrote: “Lt. Rae was a great favourite here and was beloved by his men. He made an excellent officer, and the Colonel, officers and men join in sincerest condolences”.

The three brothers of deceased are serving.

2/Lt. John G. Rae is also with the Seaforths. By coincidence he succeeded to his brother’s platoon, joining just after the latter was posted missing. 2/Lt. John Rae was commissioned to the Seaforths in April, 1915, and served with the regiment in Mesopotamia for about a year, when he was invalided home, returning in February of last year, and after recuperating proceeded to the Western Front.
Another brother, Mr Adam Rae, is a motor despatch rider in East Africa, and the youngest brother, Lt. Archibald G. Rae, joined the 3rd Hussars early in August, 1914, received a commission for services in the field in January, 1916, and at his own request was posted to the Seaforths. He was wounded on the Somme in July, 1916.

See entry below for details of his brother Archibald G. Rae

No photo available

Lieutenant Archibald G. Rae

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Rae
First Name(s): Archibald G.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: 3rd Hussars
Home Address: Castle Douglas

2/Lt. James Rae, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, who was reported missing from October 4th, 1917, is now posted as “killed in action or died of wounds on or shortly after that date, and buried November 17, 1917”. He was the eldest son of the late Provost Rae of Castle Douglas, and was in business for himself in Huddersfield. The family is connected by marriage with Ross-shire, a sister being the wife of Dr Gair, Johnstone, who is a nephew of Mr Gair, Alness. Joining the Artists’ Rifles O.T.C. in November, 1916, he was transferred to Gailes Cadet School the following month, and in April, 1917, was gazetted to the Seaforths. After being stationed at Cromarty for a short time, he left in June for France, where he served with the 2nd Seaforths till the end came. Lt. Rae married in April, 1913, Winifred, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs Furness of Monkswood, Kirkstall, Leeds, who survives him. At the time he was posted as missing the Chaplain wrote: “Lt. Rae was a great favourite here and was beloved by his men. He made an excellent officer, and the Colonel, officers and men join in sincerest condolences”.

The three brothers of deceased are serving.

2/Lt. John G. Rae is also with the Seaforths. By coincidence he succeeded to his brother’s platoon, joining just after the latter was posted missing. 2/Lt. John Rae was commissioned to the Seaforths in April, 1915, and served with the regiment in Mesopotamia for about a year, when he was invalided home, returning in February of last year, and after recuperating proceeded to the Western Front.
Another brother, Mr Adam Rae, is a motor despatch rider in East Africa, and the youngest brother, Lt. Archibald G. Rae, joined the 3rd Hussars early in August, 1914, received a commission for services in the field in January, 1916, and at his own request was posted to the Seaforths. He was wounded on the Somme in July, 1916.

See entry above for details of his brother Adam Rae

No photo available

Private Alistair Ross

Date of Paper: 30.08.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Alistair
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Fusiliers
Home Address: Struy Mains, Beauly

GALLANT ACT BY EASTER ROSS ROYAL FUSILIER

A photograph is reproduced to-day of Pte. Alistair Ross, 77558, Royal Fusiliers, who has just been home on three weeks’ leave from the Western Front, which leave was given him in recognition of his gallant act in giving a pint of his blood which was infused into that of an H.L.I. soldier in hospital, whose condition demanded such help. Pte. Ross’s father resides at Struy Mains, Beauly, but his connections are all with Easter Ross. He is a grandson of Mrs Ross, Millers’s Place, Fendom, Tain, and a nephew of Mr and Mrs Munro, Balcherry, Fendom, Tain. He is only 19 years of age. When he joined up he was apprenticed as a engineer with Messrs Macrae & Dick, Inverness. A fine stamp of soldier, he has suffered little for his gallant act. He readily volunteered to submit to the ordeal when the circumstances were made known to him, and has, other things apart, the extreme satisfaction in knowing that what he submitted to was the means of saving the life of another.

No photo available

Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Ross

Date of Paper: 08.11.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Not known

Lt.Col. Hugh A. Ross, D.S.O., killed October 27th 1918.

Photo: #6728

Shaw Donald Angus, Pte, Skye Camerons

Private Donald Angus Shaw

Date of paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Shaw
First Name(s): Donald Angus
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Skeabost, Skye

SKYE CAMERON FALLS IN ACTION

Pte. Donald Angus Shaw, Camerons, whose photograph is reproduced-to-day, was killed in action on 11th April. Twenty-five years of age, his parents, Mr Angus Shaw, mason, and Mrs Shaw, reside at Skeabost, Skye, where a brother is an assistant to Mr Campbell at Inchbae, Ross-shire. Deceased joined up in June of last year, before which he was employed as a mason.

Photo: #6702

Souter John James, 2nd Engineer, Birkenhead ex Ross-Shire

Second Engineer John James Souter

Date of paper: 30.08.1918
Surname: Souter
First Name(s): John James
Rank: Second Engineer
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: 24, Speedwell Road, Birkenhead

ROSS-SHIRE ENGINEER DROWNED AT SEA

There is reproduced to-day a photo of the late Second Engineer John James (Jack) Souter, who was drowned at sea about the 10th May. Deceased was one of the heroes of the crew of a Leyland liner, who was decorated by the King at Buckingham Palace in recognition of meritorious service in rescuing passengers and crew of the steamer Volturno of London, which was abandoned in the North Atlantic Ocean, through a fire which broke out, on October 9th, 1913. To commemorate this same act of bravery the Leyland Coy. presented him with a gold watch and chain suitably inscribed.. He was the eldest son of Mrs Mackenzie, 24 Speedwell Road, Birkenhead, and was in his 27th year. Much sympathy is felt for his mother in her loss by many friends in Ross-shire.

Photo: #6742

Tulloch E T, Pte, Beauly

Private E. T. Tulloch

Date of Paper: 14.06.1916
Surname: Tulloch
First Name(s): E. T.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Aigas, Beauly

BEAULY CAMERON ESCAPES

Pte. E. T. Tulloch, Cameron, who belongs to Aigas, in the Beauly district, and whose portrait appears to-day, was captured by the Germans in recent operations but pluckily made good his escape and reports himself hale and hearty.

Pte. Ainslie Wood, Camerons, who has arrived at his home at Bridge of Brown, near Grantown-on-Spey, was held prisoner by the enemy for five weeks, tells the following story: “On the morning of March 23, I, along with Pte. Tulloch, Beauly, Pte. Macpherson, and a few others, was surrounded by the Germans and had to surrender, after sticking to our trench mortars until the supply of shells had been exhausted. With the two men named, I was compelled to carry shells to one of his guns, after digging it into position. Then we were directed to convey one of our own wounded to a German dressing station. Our next task was the carrying of German wounded for a distance of about five kilometres to meet the Red Cross wagons – poorly equipped they are when compared with our ambulances. About 4 p.m. we were marched to the rear – over 8 kilometres – shoved into a cage like dogs and told to sleep. Cold and wet and without any shelter, we found sleep impossible. For 48 weary hours we remained in the cage, our only food being a piece of black bread and a drink of coffee without milk or sugar. Then the march was resumed for two days and we were accommodated in a large shed for a week. Great was our relief when we left it. I can only describe the food as terrible – it was really unfit for human beings. Our next halting place was the France village of Courcelette, where we were kept for three weeks unloading stone barges on the canal. The food we got was insufficient to maintain our strength. If a man ceased working he was struck by some of the sentries with the butt-end of their rifles. The majority of our men had neither a wash nor shave, and had no change of clothing during those weeks, of which I speak from bitter experience.

At a camp south of Douai, Pte. Tulloch and Macpherson and I made up our minds to attempt to escape. One dark night, unseen by the sentries, we cut our way through the wire and struck off in the direction of Arras. Next day we lay in a shell hole, donning German uniforms a night. Two sentries challenged us as we were crossing their line but we hurried on and they opened fire. We reached the Scarpe Canal. I was unable to swim, but my two comrades assisted me. As we approached the other side, the Canadians, mistaking us for Germans, fired, wounding Private Macpherson in the right shoulder. He is now in hospital in Manchester, reflecting like all three of us on his providential escape from the Huns.