Maryburgh WW I page 3

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Photo: #6365

Stewart Angus, Sapper, Maryburgh

Sapper Angus Stewart

Date of paper: 14.02.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Angus
Rank: Sapper
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Home Address: Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH SOLDIERS

Above we reproduce the photographs of three Maryburgh boys, sons of Mr and Mrs Stewart, Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh.

Sapper Angus Stewart, R.E., 28 years of age, and the eldest son, enlisted in the Army six years ago and went over to France immediately hostilities broke out, in 1914. About two years ago he was wounded, but soon recovered and returned to the Front. Late in October he was again wounded, and, unfortunately, these proved fatal, and he died on 18th October, last, three weeks before the Armistice was signed. Prior to enlisting he was employed with Messrs Fraser Brothers, fleshers, Dingwall.

Private John Stewart is an old 4th Seaforth. While employed in Conon Bridge he was a keen Territorial, and like many others he was mobilised in 1914, and went to France in November of the same year. He was through many battles with the famous Ross-shire “Terriers,” and is now the proud wearer of the Mons Star.

Private Kenneth Stewart, West Surreys, was a footman in the employment of the Duchess of Buckingham prior to enlisting. For him the end of the war came timeously, and he was never required to go on active service.

See entries below for details of his brothers John & Kenneth Stewart

Photo: #6362

Stewart John, Pte, Maryburgh

Private John Stewart

Date of paper: 14.02.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH SOLDIERS

Above we reproduce the photographs of three Maryburgh boys, sons of Mr and Mrs Stewart, Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh.

Sapper Angus Stewart, R.E., 28 years of age, and the eldest son, enlisted in the Army six years ago and went over to France immediately hostilities broke out, in 1914. About two years ago he was wounded, but soon recovered and returned to the Front. Late in October he was again wounded, and, unfortunately, these proved fatal, and he died on 18th October, last, three weeks before the Armistice was signed. Prior to enlisting he was employed with Messrs Fraser Brothers, fleshers, Dingwall.

Private John Stewart is an old 4th Seaforth. While employed in Conon Bridge he was a keen Territorial, and like many others he was mobilised in 1914, and went to France in November of the same year. He was through many battles with the famous Ross-shire “Terriers,” and is now the proud wearer of the Mons Star.

Private Kenneth Stewart, West Surreys, was a footman in the employment of the Duchess of Buckingham prior to enlisting. For him the end of the war came timeously, and he was never required to go on active service.

See entry above for details of his brother Angus and below for his brother Kenneth Stewart

Photo: #6363

Stewart Kenneth, Pte, Maryburgh

Private Kenneth Stewart

Date of paper: 14.02.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: West Surreys
Home Address: Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH SOLDIERS

Above we reproduce the photographs of three Maryburgh boys, sons of Mr and Mrs Stewart, Cameron’s Buildings, Maryburgh.

Sapper Angus Stewart, R.E., 28 years of age, and the eldest son, enlisted in the Army six years ago and went over to France immediately hostilities broke out, in 1914. About two years ago he was wounded, but soon recovered and returned to the Front. Late in October he was again wounded, and, unfortunately, these proved fatal, and he died on 18th October, last, three weeks before the Armistice was signed. Prior to enlisting he was employed with Messrs Fraser Brothers, fleshers, Dingwall.

Private John Stewart is an old 4th Seaforth. While employed in Conon Bridge he was a keen Territorial, and like many others he was mobilised in 1914, and went to France in November of the same year. He was through many battles with the famous Ross-shire “Terriers,” and is now the proud wearer of the Mons Star.

Private Kenneth Stewart, West Surreys, was a footman in the employment of the Duchess of Buckingham prior to enlisting. For him the end of the war came timeously, and he was never required to go on active service.

See entries above for details of his brothers Angus & John Stewart

Photo: #6356

Strachan Allan, Pte, Maryburgh

Private Allan Strachan

Date of Paper: 01.03.1918 and 14.02.1919
Surname: Strachan
First Name(s): Allan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Yeomanry
Home Address: Post Office, Maryburgh

There is reproduced today portraits of ex-Sergt.-Major James Strachan and four sons who, along with him, joined up during the war. Sergt.-Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan reside at Maryburgh, Ross-shire, where he retired a number of years ago on leaving the Regular Army, taking over the village Post Office and a general merchant’s business. When he retired Sergt.-Major Strachan had a long period of service at home and abroad behind him. A native of Sheriffmuir, Bridge of Allan, he went to sea early in life, and, a deep sea sailor in the heyday of windjammers, he was round the world more than once. In October 1876, when in London, he enlisted in the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, then at Edinburgh Castle. He was in Malta in 1877, Cyprus in 1878, Gibraltar in 1879, Edinburgh 1880, and India the same year. In 1885 he returned from India to the Depot at Fort George, then holding the rank of colour-sergeant. In 1887 he joined th staff of the 3rd Seaforth Militia, and 1899 became instructor to Brahan Company, 4th Seaforths, later on becoming Sergt.-Major of the battalion, and settling in Dingwall, retiring in 1902, after 26 years’ service.

On the outbreak of war, Sergt.-Major Strachan rejoined the Depot at Fort George, but after three months’ work his health compelled him to resign. Particulars of his four gallant sons, one of whom fell at Neuve Chapelle, and another has recently received the Military Medal, are given below.

Sergt. Robert Strachan (28), Tank Corps, joined a Cycle Battalion in 1916, and transferred to the Tank Corps in 1917, getting his sergeant’s stripes within eleven months after enlistment. He is meantime in England. He returned from Canada in the year of the war, and was employed in the Post Office at Conon Bridge when he joined up.

Corpl. Kenneth J. Strachan (26), Royal Engineers, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist, to take his place. He went to France in November, 1914, and wears the 1914 Star ribbon. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers when trained chemists were called for, and has since served with a special branch of this unit. Corpl. Strachan began his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay in Dingwall.

The late Corpl. Archibald Strachan, Seaforths, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths when 20 years of age went to France in November, 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. Going out to bring in a wounded man named Miller, belonging to Invergordon, he was shot through the head by a sniper. Before the war, Corporal Strachan was a clerk with Mr Dewar, Town Clerk, Dingwall.

Pte. Allan Strachan, Yeomanry, attached Aberdeen Gordons, as recently reported, has received the congratulations of the Major-General commanding the Division on the gallantry displayed by him on 21st November, 1917, on the Western Front. Pte. Strachan has also been awarded the Military Medal. On the occasion in question he was battalion runner. Particulars of his work may not yet be published, but it is known that Pte. Strachan’s conduct on that day evoked the highest admiration of his officers. Pte. Strachan, who is 19 years of age, joined up in April, 1917, and has been out since October last year. He was a clerk with Mr W. Makenzie, procurator-fiscal, before joining up.

See entries below for details of his father and three brothers

Photo: #6342

Strachan Archibald, Corp, Maryburgh

Corporal Archibald Strachan

Date of Paper: 01.03.1918 and 14.02.1919
Surname: Strachan
First Name(s): Archibald
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Post Office, Maryburgh

There is reproduced today portraits of ex-Sergt.-Major James Strachan and four sons who, along with him, joined up during the war. Sergt.-Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan reside at Maryburgh, Ross-shire, where he retired a number of years ago on leaving the Regular Army, taking over the village Post Office and a general merchant’s business. When he retired Sergt.-Major Strachan had a long period of service at home and abroad behind him. A native of Sheriffmuir, Bridge of Allan, he went to sea early in life, and, a deep sea sailor in the heyday of windjammers, he was round the world more than once. In October 1876, when in London, he enlisted in the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, then at Edinburgh Castle. He was in Malta in 1877, Cyprus in 1878, Gibraltar in 1879, Edinburgh 1880, and India the same year. In 1885 he returned from India to the Depot at Fort George, then holding the rank of colour-sergeant. In 1887 he joined th staff of the 3rd Seaforth Militia, and 1899 became instructor to Brahan Company, 4th Seaforths, later on becoming Sergt.-Major of the battalion, and settling in Dingwall, retiring in 1902, after 26 years’ service.

On the outbreak of war, Sergt.-Major Strachan rejoined the Depot at Fort George, but after three months’ work his health compelled him to resign. Particulars of his four gallant sons, one of whom fell at Neuve Chapelle, and another has recently received the Military Medal, are given below.

Sergt. Robert Strachan (28), Tank Corps, joined a Cycle Battalion in 1916, and transferred to the Tank Corps in 1917, getting his sergeant’s stripes within eleven months after enlistment. He is meantime in England. He returned from Canada in the year of the war, and was employed in the Post Office at Conon Bridge when he joined up.

Corpl. Kenneth J. Strachan (26), Royal Engineers, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist, to take his place. He went to France in November, 1914, and wears the 1914 Star ribbon. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers when trained chemists were called for, and has since served with a special branch of this unit. Corpl. Strachan began his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay in Dingwall.

The late Corpl. Archibald Strachan, Seaforths, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths when 20 years of age went to France in November, 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. Going out to bring in a wounded man named Miller, belonging to Invergordon, he was shot through the head by a sniper. Before the war, Corporal Strachan was a clerk with Mr Dewar, Town Clerk, Dingwall.

Pte. Allan Strachan, Yeomanry, attached Aberdeen Gordons, as recently reported, has received the congratulations of the Major-General commanding the Division on the gallantry displayed by him on 21st November, 1917, on the Western Front. Pte. Strachan has also been awarded the Military Medal. On the occasion in question he was battalion runner. Particulars of his work may not yet be published, but it is known that Pte. Strachan’s conduct on that day evoked the highest admiration of his officers. Pte. Strachan, who is 19 years of age, joined up in April, 1917, and has been out since October last year. He was a clerk with Mr W. Makenzie, procurator-fiscal, before joining up.

See entries above for his brother Allan and below for his father and other two brothers

Photo: #6346

Strachan James, exCSM, Maryburgh

ex-Company Sergeant Major James Strachan

Date of Paper: 01.03.1918 and 14.02.1919
Surname: Strachan
First Name(s): James
Rank: ex-Company Sergeant Major
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Post Office, Maryburgh

There is reproduced today portraits of ex-Sergt.-Major James Strachan and four sons who, along with him, joined up during the war. Sergt.-Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan reside at Maryburgh, Ross-shire, where he retired a number of years ago on leaving the Regular Army, taking over the village Post Office and a general merchant’s business. When he retired Sergt.-Major Strachan had a long period of service at home and abroad behind him. A native of Sheriffmuir, Bridge of Allan, he went to sea early in life, and, a deep sea sailor in the heyday of windjammers, he was round the world more than once. In October 1876, when in London, he enlisted in the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, then at Edinburgh Castle. He was in Malta in 1877, Cyprus in 1878, Gibraltar in 1879, Edinburgh 1880, and India the same year. In 1885 he returned from India to the Depot at Fort George, then holding the rank of colour-sergeant. In 1887 he joined th staff of the 3rd Seaforth Militia, and 1899 became instructor to Brahan Company, 4th Seaforths, later on becoming Sergt.-Major of the battalion, and settling in Dingwall, retiring in 1902, after 26 years’ service.

On the outbreak of war, Sergt.-Major Strachan rejoined the Depot at Fort George, but after three months’ work his health compelled him to resign. Particulars of his four gallant sons, one of whom fell at Neuve Chapelle, and another has recently received the Military Medal, are given below.

Sergt. Robert Strachan (28), Tank Corps, joined a Cycle Battalion in 1916, and transferred to the Tank Corps in 1917, getting his sergeant’s stripes within eleven months after enlistment. He is meantime in England. He returned from Canada in the year of the war, and was employed in the Post Office at Conon Bridge when he joined up.

Corpl. Kenneth J. Strachan (26), Royal Engineers, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist, to take his place. He went to France in November, 1914, and wears the 1914 Star ribbon. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers when trained chemists were called for, and has since served with a special branch of this unit. Corpl. Strachan began his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay in Dingwall.

The late Corpl. Archibald Strachan, Seaforths, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths when 20 years of age went to France in November, 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. Going out to bring in a wounded man named Miller, belonging to Invergordon, he was shot through the head by a sniper. Before the war, Corporal Strachan was a clerk with Mr Dewar, Town Clerk, Dingwall.

Pte. Allan Strachan, Yeomanry, attached Aberdeen Gordons, as recently reported, has received the congratulations of the Major-General commanding the Division on the gallantry displayed by him on 21st November, 1917, on the Western Front. Pte. Strachan has also been awarded the Military Medal. On the occasion in question he was battalion runner. Particulars of his work may not yet be published, but it is known that Pte. Strachan’s conduct on that day evoked the highest admiration of his officers. Pte. Strachan, who is 19 years of age, joined up in April, 1917, and has been out since October last year. He was a clerk with Mr W. Makenzie, procurator-fiscal, before joining up.

See entries above for two of his sons and below for his other two sons

Photo: #6343

Strachan Kenneth J, Corp, Maryburgh

Corporal Kenneth Strachan

Date of Paper: 01.03.1918 and 14.02.1919
Surname: Strachan
First Name(s): Kenneth J
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Home Address: Post Office, Maryburgh

There is reproduced today portraits of ex-Sergt.-Major James Strachan and four sons who, along with him, joined up during the war. Sergt.-Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan reside at Maryburgh, Ross-shire, where he retired a number of years ago on leaving the Regular Army, taking over the village Post Office and a general merchant’s business. When he retired Sergt.-Major Strachan had a long period of service at home and abroad behind him. A native of Sheriffmuir, Bridge of Allan, he went to sea early in life, and, a deep sea sailor in the heyday of windjammers, he was round the world more than once. In October 1876, when in London, he enlisted in the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, then at Edinburgh Castle. He was in Malta in 1877, Cyprus in 1878, Gibraltar in 1879, Edinburgh 1880, and India the same year. In 1885 he returned from India to the Depot at Fort George, then holding the rank of colour-sergeant. In 1887 he joined th staff of the 3rd Seaforth Militia, and 1899 became instructor to Brahan Company, 4th Seaforths, later on becoming Sergt.-Major of the battalion, and settling in Dingwall, retiring in 1902, after 26 years’ service.

On the outbreak of war, Sergt.-Major Strachan rejoined the Depot at Fort George, but after three months’ work his health compelled him to resign. Particulars of his four gallant sons, one of whom fell at Neuve Chapelle, and another has recently received the Military Medal, are given below.

Sergt. Robert Strachan (28), Tank Corps, joined a Cycle Battalion in 1916, and transferred to the Tank Corps in 1917, getting his sergeant’s stripes within eleven months after enlistment. He is meantime in England. He returned from Canada in the year of the war, and was employed in the Post Office at Conon Bridge when he joined up.

Corpl. Kenneth J. Strachan (26), Royal Engineers, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist, to take his place. He went to France in November, 1914, and wears the 1914 Star ribbon. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers when trained chemists were called for, and has since served with a special branch of this unit. Corpl. Strachan began his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay in Dingwall.

The late Corpl. Archibald Strachan, Seaforths, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths when 20 years of age went to France in November, 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. Going out to bring in a wounded man named Miller, belonging to Invergordon, he was shot through the head by a sniper. Before the war, Corporal Strachan was a clerk with Mr Dewar, Town Clerk, Dingwall.

Pte. Allan Strachan, Yeomanry, attached Aberdeen Gordons, as recently reported, has received the congratulations of the Major-General commanding the Division on the gallantry displayed by him on 21st November, 1917, on the Western Front. Pte. Strachan has also been awarded the Military Medal. On the occasion in question he was battalion runner. Particulars of his work may not yet be published, but it is known that Pte. Strachan’s conduct on that day evoked the highest admiration of his officers. Pte. Strachan, who is 19 years of age, joined up in April, 1917, and has been out since October last year. He was a clerk with Mr W. Makenzie, procurator-fiscal, before joining up.

Photo: #6344

Strachan Kenneth J, Corp, Maryburgh

Date of Paper: 14.02.1919

THE LATE CORPL. K. J. STRACHAN, MARYBURGH

It is with profound regret that the announcement will be read of the death of Corporal Kenneth James Strachan son of Sergt Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan, post office, Maryburgh, which took place at his home on Sunday morning. Corporal Strachan arrived home about a fortnight ago, after being demobilised and while at the funeral of a colleague from which developed pneumonia. This serious attack he repulsed, and on Friday he took a turn for the better, but a weakened heart, coupled with the fact that he had been gassed while on service in France, proved his undoing and he passed away as stated. Deceased was in his 27th year, and, following a few days’ sojourn at home it was his intention to resume his pre-war occupation as a chemist next week. The late Corporal Strachan mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist with Messrs T. & H. Smith, to take his place in the county battalion. He went to France in November, 1914, for which he received the Mons Medal. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers, when trained chemists were called for, and since then he served with a special branch of this unit.

Corporal Strachan served his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay, chemists, Dingwall. Much sympathy will be felt for the sorrowing father and mother and sisters and bothers. Sergt Major Strachan, himself an old Seaforth who saw 26 years service in the Regulars, and who also served in the Great War, has sent four sons to the Colours. The late Corporal Archibald Strachan, 4th Seaforths, along with the deceased went out with the county Territorials in 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915 at Neuve Chapelle. He was shot through the head by a sniper while trying to rescue a wounded comrade.

Sergt. Robert Strachan, Tank Crops returned from Canada during 1915 and immediately enlisted in a Cyclist Battalion before he eventually was transferred to his present unit. Private Allan Strachan, Gordons, enlisted when he came of military age. In the German offensive in March, 1918, he had the misfortune to be captured. He was repatriated at the end of the last year, and is now waiting to be demoblilised.

A photograph of the late Corpl. Strachan is published to-day. The funeral took place yesterday to the Dingwall Cemetery and was very largely attended.

See entries above for two of his brothers and father & below for his other brother

Photo: #6369

Strachan Robert, Sgt, Maryburgh

Sergeant Robert Strachan

Date of Paper: 01.03.1918 and 14.02.1919
Surname: Strachan
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Tank Corps
Home Address: Post Office, Maryburgh

There is reproduced today portraits of ex-Sergt.-Major James Strachan and four sons who, along with him, joined up during the war. Sergt.-Major Strachan and Mrs Strachan reside at Maryburgh, Ross-shire, where he retired a number of years ago on leaving the Regular Army, taking over the village Post Office and a general merchant’s business. When he retired Sergt.-Major Strachan had a long period of service at home and abroad behind him. A native of Sheriffmuir, Bridge of Allan, he went to sea early in life, and, a deep sea sailor in the heyday of windjammers, he was round the world more than once. In October 1876, when in London, he enlisted in the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, then at Edinburgh Castle. He was in Malta in 1877, Cyprus in 1878, Gibraltar in 1879, Edinburgh 1880, and India the same year. In 1885 he returned from India to the Depot at Fort George, then holding the rank of colour-sergeant. In 1887 he joined th staff of the 3rd Seaforth Militia, and 1899 became instructor to Brahan Company, 4th Seaforths, later on becoming Sergt.-Major of the battalion, and settling in Dingwall, retiring in 1902, after 26 years’ service.

On the outbreak of war, Sergt.-Major Strachan rejoined the Depot at Fort George, but after three months’ work his health compelled him to resign. Particulars of his four gallant sons, one of whom fell at Neuve Chapelle, and another has recently received the Military Medal, are given below.

Sergt. Robert Strachan (28), Tank Corps, joined a Cycle Battalion in 1916, and transferred to the Tank Corps in 1917, getting his sergeant’s stripes within eleven months after enlistment. He is meantime in England. He returned from Canada in the year of the war, and was employed in the Post Office at Conon Bridge when he joined up.

Corpl. Kenneth J. Strachan (26), Royal Engineers, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths in 1914, returning from Edinburgh, where he was employed as a chemist, to take his place. He went to France in November, 1914, and wears the 1914 Star ribbon. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle, he subsequently, in 1915, transferred to the Royal Engineers when trained chemists were called for, and has since served with a special branch of this unit. Corpl. Strachan began his apprenticeship with Messrs Dewar & Hay in Dingwall.

The late Corpl. Archibald Strachan, Seaforths, mobilised with the Ross-shire Seaforths when 20 years of age went to France in November, 1914, and was killed on the morning of 11th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. Going out to bring in a wounded man named Miller, belonging to Invergordon, he was shot through the head by a sniper. Before the war, Corporal Strachan was a clerk with Mr Dewar, Town Clerk, Dingwall.

Pte. Allan Strachan, Yeomanry, attached Aberdeen Gordons, as recently reported, has received the congratulations of the Major-General commanding the Division on the gallantry displayed by him on 21st November, 1917, on the Western Front. Pte. Strachan has also been awarded the Military Medal. On the occasion in question he was battalion runner. Particulars of his work may not yet be published, but it is known that Pte. Strachan’s conduct on that day evoked the highest admiration of his officers. Pte. Strachan, who is 19 years of age, joined up in April, 1917, and has been out since October last year. He was a clerk with Mr W. Makenzie, procurator-fiscal, before joining up.

See entries above for details of his father and three brothers

Photo: #6351

Urquhart George, Lieut, Australia ex Maryburgh

Lieutenant George Urquhart

Date of Paper: 14.01.1916
Surname: Urquhart
First Name(s): George
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Australian Contingent
Home Address: Queensland, Australia (formerly Maryburgh)

Mr George Urquhart, Queensland, Australia, who joined the Australian Contingent as a private, has been granted a commision in his regiment. Lieutenant Urquhart is a son of the late Mr D. Urquhart, sawmiller, Maryburgh, and of the late Mrs Urquhart, Lawson Cottage, Maryburgh, where his sister, Miss Dolly Urquhart, still resides. Lieutenant Urquhart was at one time a pupil teacher in the Maryburgh Public School, under the late Mr Mackenzie, headmaster. Over 25 years ago he left this country and settled in Queensland, where he took up the profession of stockbroker, and was a member of the firm of of A. MacCallum and Co., sharebrokers and mining agents, Charters Towers. A man of considerable literary ability, he founded and edited the North Queensland Telegraph which he conducted with considerable success. Lieutenant Urquhart was an ardent golfer, and took a leading part in resuscitating the Charters Towers Golf Club, and, previous to his leaving to join his corps, the members of the Club met and entertained him. Many comlimentary remarks were made, most of the speakers stating that while they admired his action in joining the army as a private they regretted it. One of the speakers said he felt resentful that a man of Mr Urquhart’s time of life should have to go and rough it as a private, although it showed a fine spirit of sacrifice. Lieutenant Urquhart, in acknowledging the kind words, said he had joined the army of his own accord. He was physically fit, and irrespective of his age, he felt it was his duty to go. He had had a little military training in the old country, having joined when he was about 14 years of age and two inches under height. As regards rifle shooting he did not think he would be far behind the others when he got into the trenches.

Some years ago Lieutenant Urquhart, along with his wife, paid a visit to his native village, where he received a warm welcome.

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