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Photo: #6353

Maclennan A A, Pte, Maryburgh

Private A. A. Maclennan

Date of Paper: 17.12.1915
Surname: Maclennan
First Name(s): A. A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: H (Brahan) Company.
Home Address: Bank Cottage, Maryburgh

We reproduce above the photograph of the late Private John M Maclennan, son of Mr Maclennan, who for many years was gamekeeper at Brahan, and who has now retired, and Mrs Maclennan, Bank Cottage, Maryburgh. Private Maclennan was killed on 11th March at Neuve Chapelle, was only 19 years of age, and was a member of H. (Brahan) Company. Previous to the war he was a sawmiller to trade. He was a well-known athlete, and was a prominent prize-winner at the annual games in the county.

Private A. A. Maclennan, a brother of the deceased, who is 21 years of age, is also a member of H. Company. He is a saddler to trade, and was employed with Mr James Mackenzie, saddler, Dingwall. He went out to France with the battalion in November 1914. In the spring he was invalided home, but has now rejoined, and is with the 3/4th Seaforths at Ripon.

See entry below for details of his brother John Maclennan

Photo: #6360

Maclennan John M, Pte, Maryburgh

Private John M Maclennan

Date of Paper: 17.12.1915
Surname: Maclennan
First Name(s): John M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: H (Brahan) Company
Home Address: Bank Cottage, Maryburgh

We reproduce above the photograph of the late Private John M Maclennan, son of Mr Maclennan, who for many years was gamekeeper at Brahan, and who has now retired, and Mrs Maclennan, Bank Cottage, Maryburgh. Private Maclennan was killed on 11th March at Neuve Chapelle, was only 19 years of age, and was a member of H. (Brahan) Company. Previous to the war he was a sawmiller to trade. He was a well-known athlete, and was a prominent prize-winner at the annual games in the county.

Private A. A. Maclennan, a brother of the deceased, who is 21 years of age, is also a member of H. Company. He is a saddler to trade, and was employed with Mr James Mackenzie, saddler, Dingwall. He went out to France with the battalion in November 1914. In the spring he was invalided home, but has now rejoined, and is with the 3/4th Seaforths at Ripon.

See entry above for details of his brother A. A. Maclennan

Photo: #6361

Macphail John, Pte, Brahan

Private John Macphail

Date of Paper: 19.04.1918
Surname: Macphail
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Trench Mortar Battery
Home Address: Tollie of Brahan, Maryburgh

Much sympathy is felt with Mr and Mrs Macphail, Tollie of Brahan, Ross-shire, in the death of their son, Pte. John Macphail, who was killed by the bursting of a shell on 14th March, as already briefly recorded.

A photograph appears today. Pte. Macphail went out with the 4th Seaforths in November 1914, and took part in all the battles which have made the County Regiment famous, subsequently serving with the 5th Seaforths, while about nine months ago was transferred to a Trench Mortar Battery. He was wounded in the High Wood in 1917, and was home on leave about a month ago.

The following letter to his father from his Captain describes the manner of his death. “Dear Mr Macphail – It is with the deepest regret I have to inform you that your son, 242299 Pte. John Macphail, was killed by the bursting of a shell on the night of the 14/15th March. Another officer and myself were about 150 yards to the right at the time, going over the work that had been done. Pte. Macphail had been with this unit for a period of nine months, and his record of service in France is a splendid one. Coming out here in November 1914, he was eligible for the special distinction awarded to those who landed in the country before the 23rd November. Your son was a quiet, unassuming lad, who always did his duty, and he had the confidence of officers and men. By his death this unit has lost one of its number who could always be relied on to carry through the task in hand cheerfully and to the best of his ability. Officers and men of this unit unite with me in offering you our deepest sympathy in your great loss.”

Photo: #6352

Macrae Kenneth, Pte, Lochussie

Private Kenneth Macrae

Paper: 22.12.1916
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lochussie, Conon Bridge

Pte. Ken Macrae (“Chappie”) is a son of Mr Murdo Macrae, Lochussie, Conon Bridge, and went to France with the battalion in November 1914. He has entertained great admiration for the French fair sex, with whom he is a general favourite. Before the outbreak of the war Kenneth was employed on the Brahan Estate. He is in the Transport Section, and endeared by all on account of his comic expressions and old fashioned yarns.

Photo: #7102

Masters H D, Sergt, Dingwall

Staff Sergeant-Saddler Harry D. Masters

Date of Paper: 09.02.1917
Surname: Masters
First Name(s): Harry D.
Rank: Staff Sergeant-Saddler
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Macdonald’s Court, Dingwall (formerly Keithtown, Brahan, Maryburgh)

TWO BRAHAN BOYS WITH THE COLOURS

Above will be found reproduced photographs of two gallant brothers, sons of Mrs Master, Keithtown, Brahan, who are serving with the Colours, and one of whom has been both wounded and gassed.

Staff Sergt.-Saddler Harry D. Masters, Ross Mountain Battery, is 32 years of age, and is an saddler to trade, having been in the employment of Mr James Fraser, saddler, Dingwall, when he was mobilised. Sergt. Masters took a keen interest in the R.M.B. from its initiation, and he was very popular with the boys. He has been in the East with the Battery since they went to the Dardanelles in 1915. His wife and family, a boy and girl, reside in Macdonald’s Court, Dingwall.

Lance-Corpl. William Masters, Black Watch, has not been so fortunate as his brother. He has been on the Western front, and was wounded in the thigh at Loos in September 1915. After recovering he returned to France, and had the misfortune to be gassed some little time ago. He is now in a War Hospital at Bath, and is progressing well. Twenty-five years of age, and a gardener to trade, he served his apprenticeship in the Brahan Gardens, from where he went to Tarbat Gardens. He was in Falkirk when the war started, and immediately volunteered for service. Mrs Masters is to be congratulated on her two soldier sons.

See entry below for details of his brother William Masters

Photo: #6350

Masters William, L Corp, Maryburgh

Lance Corporal William Masters

Date of Paper: 09.02.1917
Surname: Masters
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Black Watch
Home Address: Keithtown, Brahan, Maryburgh

TWO BRAHAN BOYS WITH THE COLOURS

Above will be found reproduced photographs of two gallant brothers, sons of Mrs Master, Keithtown, Brahan, who are serving with the Colours, and one of whom has been both wounded and gassed.

Staff Sergt.-Saddler Harry D. Masters, Ross Mountain Battery, is 32 years of age, and is an saddler to trade, having been in the employment of Mr James Fraser, saddler, Dingwall, when he was mobilised. Sergt. Masters took a keen interest in the R.M.B. from its initiation, and he was very popular with the boys. He has been in the East with the Battery since they went to the Dardanelles in 1915. His wife and family, a boy and girl, reside in Macdonald’s Court, Dingwall.

Lance-Corpl. William Masters, Black Watch, has not been so fortunate as his brother. He has been on the Western front, and was wounded in the thigh at Loos in September 1915. After recovering he returned to France, and had the misfortune to be gassed some little time ago. He is now in a War Hospital at Bath, and is progressing well. Twenty-five years of age, and a gardener to trade, he served his apprenticeship in the Brahan Gardens, from where he went to Tarbat Gardens. He was in Falkirk when the war started, and immediately volunteered for service. Mrs Masters is to be congratulated on her two soldier sons.

See entry above for details of his brother Harry D. Masters

Photo: #6366

Oag Alexander, Sgt, Maryburgh

Sergeant Alexander Oag

Date of Paper: 18.02.1916
Surname: Oag
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Balnain, Maryburgh

Sergt. Alex. Oag, who was a reservist (seven years service) at the outbreak of war, is a native of Aberdeenshire, but has resided for a number of years in Ross-shire. He is well known in the Maryburgh and Conon district, where for six years he was foreman farm servant at Balnain. He has been in France since 1914, and has been through most of the important engagements, which he was fortunate enough to come through without a scratch. He has been twice home on leave to see his wife and his young son, who are resident at Balnain. Sergt. Oag is a capital soldier, and very well liked in his battalion. He is 35 years of age, and was promoted corporal to sergeant very soon after he arrived in France.

Photo: #6345

Stevens Joseph Henry, Engineer, Maryburgh

Engineer Joseph Henry Stevens

Date of paper: 25.01.1918
Surname: Stevens
First Name(s): Joseph Henry
Rank: Engineer
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: 53, Stockland Street, Cardiff

Another promising career cut short as the result of ruthless enemy action at sea, is that of Joseph Henry Stevens, a native of Ross-shire, whose home was in Cardiff. The vessel in which he was serving was torpedoed on December 3rd, 1917, and his friends have been officially informed of his death on that date.

Born at Maryburgh on December 27th, 1886, he was educated at the school there and afterwards at Dingwall Academy. On leaving school he became an apprentice in the engineering firm of Messrs Mackinnon & Coy., Spring Gardens, Aberdeen, taking at the same time the course for applied mechanics at Gordon’s College in that city. At the end of his apprenticeship he chose a seafaring career and in due course passed the Board of Trade examinations at Cardiff as second and first engineer.

In April, 1915, he married the youngest daughter of Mr Evans, 53 Stockland Street, Cardiff, by whom and a baby girl he is survived. His loss is also deeply mourned by his parents and three sisters residing at 72 Gladstone Street, Swindon, Wiltshire. His father, Mr J.M. Stevens, is an Afghan veteran, and ex-Colour-Sergt. of the Seaforths, who acted successively as instructor of the Brahan and Alness Volunteer Coys,. and was for a number of years postmaster at Conon-Bridge.

Photo: #6348

Ross Andrew F, Gunner, Maryburgh

Gunner Andrew F. Ross

Date of Paper: 31.12.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Andrew F.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: R.G.A.
Home Address: St Andrews (formerly Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh)

Mr and Mrs Thomas Ross, Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh, recently celebrated their golden wedding amid manifestations of congratulations. The happy couple were married at Fearn, Ross-shire, by the Rev. Mr Macdonald, on 7th December, 1865. Both Mr and Mrs Ross are natives of Ross, and the last twenty years of their married life have been spent at Dunglass, where Mr Ross was a farm servant up till a couple of years ago. The latter is hale and hearty, and goes about daily, but, unfortunately, Mrs Ross has been a martyr to sciatica for two years. She, however, is able to get about daily, and is always bright and cheerful. The family consists of six sons and four daughters. Three of the latter are married, while the youngest of the girls is at home with the parents. Of the sons four are with the colours, and in addition to giving the portraits of the mother and father, we also reproduce the photographs of the four soldier sons. They are as follows:
John, the eldest son, is a sergeant with a Red Cross Detachment stationed in England. He was a saddler to trade, and has been for years in Aberdeen, where his wife and family now reside.
His eldest son, Matthew, is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the Dardanelles.
Thomas is with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., in Egypt. Previous to the war he was a chauffeur in private service in Glasgow, where his wife resides.
L.-Corpl. Robert W. Ross belongs to the 1/4th Seaforths. He was a farm servant at Dunglass previous to the war, and being an ardent Territorial, he responded heartily to the call when it came in August, 1914. He went to France with his battalion, but was subsequently attached to the A.S.C. section with the 9th Ghurkas. He is at present at home on furlough.
Gunner Andrew F. Ross is with the R.G.A. in Yarmouth. He was a tailor to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr J. W. Macdonald, Conon. A few years ago he went to Glasgow, and two years ago he went to St Andrews, where he held a good post.
Jim, the fourth son, is a cattleman on a home farm in England, and under Lord Derby’s scheme has been attested for service with the Army Veterinary Corps.
Alexander is at Dunglass maintaining the home.
It is an interesting record, of which the happy old couple are justly proud. It is the wish of their many friends that they live to see their sons gain honour and glory, and come back safe and sound.

See entries below for details of his four brothers

No photo available

James Ross

Date of Paper: 31.12.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): James
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Army Veterinary Corps
Home Address: Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Thomas Ross, Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh, recently celebrated their golden wedding amid manifestations of congratulations. The happy couple were married at Fearn, Ross-shire, by the Rev. Mr Macdonald, on 7th December, 1865. Both Mr and Mrs Ross are natives of Ross, and the last twenty years of their married life have been spent at Dunglass, where Mr Ross was a farm servant up till a couple of years ago. The latter is hale and hearty, and goes about daily, but, unfortunately, Mrs Ross has been a martyr to sciatica for two years. She, however, is able to get about daily, and is always bright and cheerful. The family consists of six sons and four daughters. Three of the latter are married, while the youngest of the girls is at home with the parents. Of the sons four are with the colours, and in addition to giving the portraits of the mother and father, we also reproduce the photographs of the four soldier sons. They are as follows:
John, the eldest son, is a sergeant with a Red Cross Detachment stationed in England. He was a saddler to trade, and has been for years in Aberdeen, where his wife and family now reside.
His eldest son, Matthew, is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the Dardanelles.
Thomas is with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., in Egypt. Previous to the war he was a chauffeur in private service in Glasgow, where his wife resides.
L.-Corpl. Robert W. Ross belongs to the 1/4th Seaforths. He was a farm servant at Dunglass previous to the war, and being an ardent Territorial, he responded heartily to the call when it came in August, 1914. He went to France with his battalion, but was subsequently attached to the A.S.C. section with the 9th Ghurkas. He is at present at home on furlough.
Gunner Andrew F. Ross is with the R.G.A. in Yarmouth. He was a tailor to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr J. W. Macdonald, Conon. A few years ago he went to Glasgow, and two years ago he went to St Andrews, where he held a good post.
Jim, the fourth son, is a cattleman on a home farm in England, and under Lord Derby’s scheme has been attested for service with the Army Veterinary Corps.
Alexander is at Dunglass maintaining the home.
It is an interesting record, of which the happy old couple are justly proud. It is the wish of their many friends that they live to see their sons gain honour and glory, and come back safe and sound.

See entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6368

Ross John, Sgt, Maryburgh

Sergeant John Ross

Date of Paper: 31.12.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Red Cross Detachment
Home Address: Aberdeen (formerly Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh)

Mr and Mrs Thomas Ross, Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh, recently celebrated their golden wedding amid manifestations of congratulations. The happy couple were married at Fearn, Ross-shire, by the Rev. Mr Macdonald, on 7th December, 1865. Both Mr and Mrs Ross are natives of Ross, and the last twenty years of their married life have been spent at Dunglass, where Mr Ross was a farm servant up till a couple of years ago. The latter is hale and hearty, and goes about daily, but, unfortunately, Mrs Ross has been a martyr to sciatica for two years. She, however, is able to get about daily, and is always bright and cheerful. The family consists of six sons and four daughters. Three of the latter are married, while the youngest of the girls is at home with the parents. Of the sons four are with the colours, and in addition to giving the portraits of the mother and father, we also reproduce the photographs of the four soldier sons. They are as follows:
John, the eldest son, is a sergeant with a Red Cross Detachment stationed in England. He was a saddler to trade, and has been for years in Aberdeen, where his wife and family now reside.
His eldest son, Matthew, is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the Dardanelles.
Thomas is with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., in Egypt. Previous to the war he was a chauffeur in private service in Glasgow, where his wife resides.
L.-Corpl. Robert W. Ross belongs to the 1/4th Seaforths. He was a farm servant at Dunglass previous to the war, and being an ardent Territorial, he responded heartily to the call when it came in August, 1914. He went to France with his battalion, but was subsequently attached to the A.S.C. section with the 9th Ghurkas. He is at present at home on furlough.
Gunner Andrew F. Ross is with the R.G.A. in Yarmouth. He was a tailor to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr J. W. Macdonald, Conon. A few years ago he went to Glasgow, and two years ago he went to St Andrews, where he held a good post.
Jim, the fourth son, is a cattleman on a home farm in England, and under Lord Derby’s scheme has been attested for service with the Army Veterinary Corps.
Alexander is at Dunglass maintaining the home.
It is an interesting record, of which the happy old couple are justly proud. It is the wish of their many friends that they live to see their sons gain honour and glory, and come back safe and sound.

See entries above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #6349

Ross Robert W, L Corp, Maryburgh

Lance Corporal Robert W. Ross

Date of Paper: 31.12.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Robert W.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: A.S.C. / 9th Ghurkas
Home Address: Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh

Mr and Mrs Thomas Ross, Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh, recently celebrated their golden wedding amid manifestations of congratulations. The happy couple were married at Fearn, Ross-shire, by the Rev. Mr Macdonald, on 7th December, 1865. Both Mr and Mrs Ross are natives of Ross, and the last twenty years of their married life have been spent at Dunglass, where Mr Ross was a farm servant up till a couple of years ago. The latter is hale and hearty, and goes about daily, but, unfortunately, Mrs Ross has been a martyr to sciatica for two years. She, however, is able to get about daily, and is always bright and cheerful. The family consists of six sons and four daughters. Three of the latter are married, while the youngest of the girls is at home with the parents. Of the sons four are with the colours, and in addition to giving the portraits of the mother and father, we also reproduce the photographs of the four soldier sons. They are as follows:
John, the eldest son, is a sergeant with a Red Cross Detachment stationed in England. He was a saddler to trade, and has been for years in Aberdeen, where his wife and family now reside.
His eldest son, Matthew, is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the Dardanelles.
Thomas is with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., in Egypt. Previous to the war he was a chauffeur in private service in Glasgow, where his wife resides.
L.-Corpl. Robert W. Ross belongs to the 1/4th Seaforths. He was a farm servant at Dunglass previous to the war, and being an ardent Territorial, he responded heartily to the call when it came in August, 1914. He went to France with his battalion, but was subsequently attached to the A.S.C. section with the 9th Ghurkas. He is at present at home on furlough.
Gunner Andrew F. Ross is with the R.G.A. in Yarmouth. He was a tailor to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr J. W. Macdonald, Conon. A few years ago he went to Glasgow, and two years ago he went to St Andrews, where he held a good post.
Jim, the fourth son, is a cattleman on a home farm in England, and under Lord Derby’s scheme has been attested for service with the Army Veterinary Corps.
Alexander is at Dunglass maintaining the home.
It is an interesting record, of which the happy old couple are justly proud. It is the wish of their many friends that they live to see their sons gain honour and glory, and come back safe and sound.

See entries above and entry below for details of his four brothers

No photo available

Driver Thomas Ross

Date of Paper: 31.12.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Driver ?
Regiment: Mechanical Transport A.S.C.
Home Address: Glasgow (formerly Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh)

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Thomas Ross, Dunglass Farm, Maryburgh, recently celebrated their golden wedding amid manifestations of congratulations. The happy couple were married at Fearn, Ross-shire, by the Rev. Mr Macdonald, on 7th December, 1865. Both Mr and Mrs Ross are natives of Ross, and the last twenty years of their married life have been spent at Dunglass, where Mr Ross was a farm servant up till a couple of years ago. The latter is hale and hearty, and goes about daily, but, unfortunately, Mrs Ross has been a martyr to sciatica for two years. She, however, is able to get about daily, and is always bright and cheerful. The family consists of six sons and four daughters. Three of the latter are married, while the youngest of the girls is at home with the parents. Of the sons four are with the colours, and in addition to giving the portraits of the mother and father, we also reproduce the photographs of the four soldier sons. They are as follows:
John, the eldest son, is a sergeant with a Red Cross Detachment stationed in England. He was a saddler to trade, and has been for years in Aberdeen, where his wife and family now reside.
His eldest son, Matthew, is serving with the R.A.M.C. at the Dardanelles.
Thomas is with the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., in Egypt. Previous to the war he was a chauffeur in private service in Glasgow, where his wife resides.
L.-Corpl. Robert W. Ross belongs to the 1/4th Seaforths. He was a farm servant at Dunglass previous to the war, and being an ardent Territorial, he responded heartily to the call when it came in August, 1914. He went to France with his battalion, but was subsequently attached to the A.S.C. section with the 9th Ghurkas. He is at present at home on furlough.
Gunner Andrew F. Ross is with the R.G.A. in Yarmouth. He was a tailor to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr J. W. Macdonald, Conon. A few years ago he went to Glasgow, and two years ago he went to St Andrews, where he held a good post.
Jim, the fourth son, is a cattleman on a home farm in England, and under Lord Derby’s scheme has been attested for service with the Army Veterinary Corps.
Alexander is at Dunglass maintaining the home.
It is an interesting record, of which the happy old couple are justly proud. It is the wish of their many friends that they live to see their sons gain honour and glory, and come back safe and sound.

See entries above for details of his four brothers