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Photo: #6354

Allan Alexander, Pte, Maryburgh

Private Alexander Allan

Date of Paper: 20.07.1917
Surname: Allan
First Name(s): Alexander.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Scots Fusiliers
Home Address: Brae Cottage, Maryburgh

A portrait appears to-day of Private A. Allan, Royal Scots Fusiliers, formerly reported missing and now reported killed in action on 11th April. The information was received by his wife, Mrs Allan, Brae Cottage, Maryburgh, and formerly of 23 Simpson St., Nairn. Before the war Pte. Allan was a coachman in Nairn, to which he belongs, but in this district he is well-remembered as a coachman with Messrs Lunn, Strathpeffer. Deceased was 30 years of age, and Mrs Allan is left with four young children on her hands.

Much sympathy is felt in the district with the bereaved widow and children.

Photo: #6347

Campbell Alexander, Gunner, Lochussie

Gunner Alexander Campbell

Date of Paper: 02.05.1919
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Gunner
Regimen: Royal Marine Artillery
Home Address: Lochussie, Conon Bridge

A BRAVE LOCHUSSIE SIGNALLER

Gunner Alexander Campbell, D.S.M., Royal Marine Artillery, a son of Mr Finlay Campbell, Lochussie, Conon Bridge, was awarded the D.S.M. for bravery in action. He was acting as signaller and the battery being cut off he spent four hours under fire repairing the wires. Gunner Campbell, who is 28 years of age, was serving in the Glasgow police Force when he enlisted on 27th November, 1915. Early in 1916 he crossed to France with the Anti-aircraft Brigade, subsequently returning to Portsmouth where he passed through a course of signalling. He returned to France in 1917 with a Seige Battery, and remained there until Christmas last. He is now demobilised and has returned to his duties in Glasgow.

A brother, Pte. Thomas Campbell, aged 20, was an electrical engineer when he joined the Scottish Horse in February, 1917. He was subsequently transferred to the Black Watch and went to France in March, 1918, taking part in the retreat of that month and in the subsequent advance marching to the Rhine with the Army of occupation. He was slightly wounded on 23rd March last, but made a good recovery.

Lieut. Cuthbert Dinnie Smith, Scottish Horse, is a brother-in-law and his wife and child reside at Llanrwst, North Wales. Aged 38 years, he is a fishery inspector. In August, 1914, he joined the Scottish Horse, and subsequently saw service in Egypt and Salonica where he was promoted sergeant. He received his commission in February, 1918, and saw service in Ireland. He is now with the Army of Occupation. Lieut. Smith served throughout the South African campaign.

Pte. John Macaulay, 3rd Hants Regiment, was another brother-in-law, who unfortunately died from pneumonia on 7th November, 1918, after only about six months service. He was 40 years of age and is survived by his widow and four children. He was a gamekeeper and resided, prior to enlisting, at Glen Guitter Lodge, Oban.

A photograph of Gunner A. Campbell appears above

See entry below for details of his brother Thomas Campell

No photo available

Private Thomas Campbell

Date of Paper: 02.05.1919
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Private
Regiment: Black Watch
Home Address: Lochussie, Conon Bridge

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Campbell

Photo: #6358

Campbell Evan, Pte, Marybugh

Private Evan Campbell

Date of Paper: 03.08.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Evan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH CAMPBELL BROTHERS WOUNDED

There appears to-day the portraits of two of the three soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Hugh Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh.

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, as recently reported, was severely wounded, and has since lost his arm, and is in hospital in Essex. He was previously wounded in the knee and back in October, 1916. Before enlistment, Pte. Campbell was a farm servant for over four years at Daviot, before which he was employed similarly in the Black Isle. He joined the Gordons two years ago and is 27 years of age.

Pte. Evan Campbell joined up on mobilisation, and is serving with a Seaforth Service Battalion in which there are not a few Ross-shire men, several of them originally Territorials. Pte. Evan Campbell, who is 24 years of age, was wounded in the arm and foot, but, making a good recovery, is once more back in the firing line.

The third son, Pte. John A. Campbell, Ross-shire Seaforths, is in hospital in England. He was wounded in the leg, which was broken in two places, and the bone split from ankle to knee. His progress is slow but satisfactory, and his cheery optimistic letters make light of two operations undergone already. This is the third time for John to be wounded, and each time it was a ‘Blighty’ wound.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, son of Mr Hugh Campbell and Mrs Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh passed away on Armistice Day, and was buried last Thursday in Fodderty Churchyard, the Rev. A. J. Sellar, Ferintosh, conducting the services. Deceased had seen much service, receiving his discharge after serious wounds, losing his left arm on the Western Front in 1916. A great favourite in the battalion and in civil life, he was well known in the Black Isle where he served on several farms. He was 27 years of age. A brother, Pte. John A. Campbell, Seaforths, who was four times wounded, is presently suffering from pneumonia.

Another brother, Pte. Evan Campbell, who enlisted the Ross Mountain Battery early in the war, is now in the Seaforths. He also was wounded, and was home lately from France on leave.

A photo of Pte. Wm. Campbell appears today.

See entries below for details of his brothers John & William Campbell

Photo: #6359

Campbell John A, Pte, Maryburgh

Private John A. Campbell

Date of Paper: 03.08.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): John A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH CAMPBELL BROTHERS WOUNDED

There appears to-day the portraits of two of the three soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Hugh Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh.

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, as recently reported, was severely wounded, and has since lost his arm, and is in hospital in Essex. He was previously wounded in the knee and back in October, 1916. Before enlistment, Pte. Campbell was a farm servant for over four years at Daviot, before which he was employed similarly in the Black Isle. He joined the Gordons two years ago and is 27 years of age.

Pte. Evan Campbell joined up on mobilisation, and is serving with a Seaforth Service Battalion in which there are not a few Ross-shire men, several of them originally Territorials. Pte. Evan Campbell, who is 24 years of age, was wounded in the arm and foot, but, making a good recovery, is once more back in the firing line.

The third son, Pte. John A. Campbell, Ross-shire Seaforths, is in hospital in England. He was wounded in the leg, which was broken in two places, and the bone split from ankle to knee. His progress is slow but satisfactory, and his cheery optimistic letters make light of two operations undergone already. This is the third time for John to be wounded, and each time it was a ‘Blighty’ wound.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, son of Mr Hugh Campbell and Mrs Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh passed away on Armistice Day, and was buried last Thursday in Fodderty Churchyard, the Rev. A. J. Sellar, Ferintosh, conducting the services. Deceased had seen much service, receiving his discharge after serious wounds, losing his left arm on the Western Front in 1916. A great favourite in the battalion and in civil life, he was well known in the Black Isle where he served on several farms. He was 27 years of age. A brother, Pte. John A. Campbell, Seaforths, who was four times wounded, is presently suffering from pneumonia.

Another brother, Pte. Evan Campbell, who enlisted the Ross Mountain Battery early in the war, is now in the Seaforths. He also was wounded, and was home lately from France on leave.

A photo of Pte. Wm. Campbell appears today.

See entry above for details of his brother Evan & below for details of his brother William Campbell

Photo: #6359

Campbell William, Pte, Maryburgh

Private William Campbell

Date of Paper: 03.08.1917
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh

THREE MARYBURGH CAMPBELL BROTHERS WOUNDED

There appears to-day the portraits of two of the three soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Hugh Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh.

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, as recently reported, was severely wounded, and has since lost his arm, and is in hospital in Essex. He was previously wounded in the knee and back in October, 1916. Before enlistment, Pte. Campbell was a farm servant for over four years at Daviot, before which he was employed similarly in the Black Isle. He joined the Gordons two years ago and is 27 years of age.

Pte. Evan Campbell joined up on mobilisation, and is serving with a Seaforth Service Battalion in which there are not a few Ross-shire men, several of them originally Territorials. Pte. Evan Campbell, who is 24 years of age, was wounded in the arm and foot, but, making a good recovery, is once more back in the firing line.

The third son, Pte. John A. Campbell, Ross-shire Seaforths, is in hospital in England. He was wounded in the leg, which was broken in two places, and the bone split from ankle to knee. His progress is slow but satisfactory, and his cheery optimistic letters make light of two operations undergone already. This is the third time for John to be wounded, and each time it was a ‘Blighty’ wound.

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918

Pte. William Campbell, Gordons, son of Mr Hugh Campbell and Mrs Campbell, Rustic Cottage, Maryburgh passed away on Armistice Day, and was buried last Thursday in Fodderty Churchyard, the Rev. A. J. Sellar, Ferintosh, conducting the services. Deceased had seen much service, receiving his discharge after serious wounds, losing his left arm on the Western Front in 1916. A great favourite in the battalion and in civil life, he was well known in the Black Isle where he served on several farms. He was 27 years of age. A brother, Pte. John A. Campbell, Seaforths, who was four times wounded, is presently suffering from pneumonia.

Another brother, Pte. Evan Campbell, who enlisted the Ross Mountain Battery early in the war, is now in the Seaforths. He also was wounded, and was home lately from France on leave.

A photo of Pte. Wm. Campbell appears today.

See entries above for details of his brothers Evan and John Campbell

Photo: #6367

Dunbar George, Sgt, Edinburgh Ex Maryburgh

Sergeant Major George Dunbar

Date of Paper: 28.05.1920
Surname: Dunbar
First Name(s): George
Rank: Sergeant Major
Regiment: 5th Royal Scots
Home Address: 27 Westfield Road, Edinburgh

Reproduced above is a portrait of Regimental Sergt.-Major George Dunbar, 5th Royal Scots, whose death we recorded in a previous issue. Many people in Ross-shire and particularly in Dingwall and Maryburgh, where he was well known and highly respected, will regret to hear the announcement, A native of Forres, deceased enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders at Edinburgh Castle on 1st October, 1888 at the early age of 15 1/2 years. He went to Egypt with his regiment and took part in the Nile Expedition. He was also at the occupation of Crete. A good soldier, with a commanding personality, he rapidly rose in the ranks. As Colour Sergeant he was appointed an instructor to the volunteers and was drafted to Ross-shire, where he took charge of the Brahan Company and was resident at Maryburgh. From here he came to Dingwall, and in addition to being instructor to the Dingwall Company, he was Sergt. Major of the Battalion.

After 22 years service he retired and going to Edinburgh he secured an important appointment, and when war broke out in August, 1914, he was on the staff of the 5th Royal Scots. He immediately mobilised with the Battalion and inspired with the old fighting spirit of the Highlander, he volunteered for service overseas. Eventually he was drafted with the regiment to Gallipolli, where he took part in that campaign and was present at the evacuation. From the east the regiment was transferred to the Western front in France, where he acted as Regimental Sergt.-Major. Invalided home in 1917 he was in hospital for a time, but making a rapid recovery he was sent to a training camp as an instructor, where he remained for some months. A second time he was sent to France, but the strain proved too much for him, and he returned to England where he was sent to hospital. For two years and three months hopes were entertained for his recovery, but he succumbed on 9th May, at the early age of 46 years, a victim of the Great War.

Kindly, sincere and obliging, he was a very popular n.c.o. no matter where he was. Capable to a degree he knew his drill to perfection, and no one took a keener interest in his men. A devoted husband and father, much sympathy is expressed with his widow, a daughter of the late Mr Fraser, and Mrs Fraser, Nicol’s Court, Dingwall.

The funeral took place from his residence, 27 Westfield Road, Edinburgh, to Saughton Cemetery, with full military honours. A detachment of Seaforths, now lying at Edinburgh Castle, and a detachment of the 5th Royal Scots, with pipes and bugles, accompanied the gun carriage, which was pulled by four horses. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack, and covered with wreaths, including one from both regiments in which he had served. The procession was a very imposing and impressive one and was followed by a very large crowd of mourners, including many old comrades, among whom where, Major Glynn, and Captain Wilson, Royal Scots, and Lieut. And Q.M. Henderson, Seaforths. At the grave the pipers played a lament and twelve buglers sounded the Last Post

Sergt.-Major Dunbar was the proud wearer of the Egyptian Medal, Indian Medal with clasps 1898; Mediterranean Medal, 1900-01, and the Long Service and Good Conduct medals.

Photo: #6355

Falconer Alexander, Pte, Maryburgh

Private Alexander Falconer

Date of Paper: 23.08.1918
Surname: Falconer
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Red House, Maryburgh.

MARYBURGH NURSE'S SACRIFICE

Of three sons of the late Mr Adam Falconer, farmer, Laid, Clyth, Caithness, and Mrs Falconer, nurse, Red House, Maryburgh, two have served with the colours, and, as formerly announced, one of the two soldier sons (whose photos. appear to-day) died of wounds on August 3rd, 1917.

The eldest son of the family is Mr William Falconer, headmaster, Mid Clyth Public School.
The second son, 200530 Pte. Alex. Falconer, Seaforths, joined the Ross-shire Territorials in January, 1917. Trained at Ripon, he went to France in May following, and had been only three times up the line when he was wounded and succumbed to his injuries in No. 4 Casualty Clearing Station on 3rd August, 1917. A fine quiet, mannerly young soldier, 23 years of age, he was a ploughman with Mr Ross, Balachraggan, Kildary, when he joined the colours.

Pte. Donald Falconer, Seaforths, is only 18 years of age, and interrupted a promising educational career as a student to join the Army. He is training at Glencorse.

See entry below for details of his brother Donald Falconer

Photo: #6357

Falconer Donald, Pte, Maryburgh

Private Donald Falconer

Date of Paper: 23.08.1918
Surname: Falconer
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Red House, Maryburgh.

MARYBURGH NURSE'S SACRIFICE

Of three sons of the late Mr Adam Falconer, farmer, Laid, Clyth, Caithness, and Mrs Falconer, nurse, Red House, Maryburgh, two have served with the colours, and, as formerly announced, one of the two soldier sons (whose photos. appear to-day) died of wounds on August 3rd, 1917.

The eldest son of the family is Mr William Falconer, headmaster, Mid Clyth Public School.
The second son, 200530 Pte. Alex. Falconer, Seaforths, joined the Ross-shire Territorials in January, 1917. Trained at Ripon, he went to France in May following, and had been only three times up the line when he was wounded and succumbed to his injuries in No. 4 Casualty Clearing Station on 3rd August, 1917. A fine quiet, mannerly young soldier, 23 years of age, he was a ploughman with Mr Ross, Balachraggan, Kildary, when he joined the colours.

Pte. Donald Falconer, Seaforths, is only 18 years of age, and interrupted a promising educational career as a student to join the Army. He is training at Glencorse.

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Falconer