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Photo: #6341

Chisholm D, Pte, Marybank

Private D. Chisholm

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Chisholm
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Moy Bridge, Marybank, Muir of Ord

Missing since 20th September. He was last seen in the advance on that date. Before joining up Pte. Chisholm was in the employment of Messrs Robertson & Porter, motor engineers, Dingwall, and previous to that he was a gamekeeper at Scatwell, near Contin. His parents reside at Moy Bridge, Marybank, Muir of Ord, and they would welcome any information regarding him from any of his comrades who were in action with him on that date.

Pte. Chisholm was a great favourite with all who knew him, in and around Contin district. He was of a bright kindly disposition, upright, and lovable, and it is hoped that his parents and sisters may receive some news of his whereabouts through the medium of this paper. A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6503

Combe Henry C S, Capt, Strathconon

Photo: #6502

Combe Henry C S, Capt, Strathconon

Lieutenant Colonel Henry Christian Seymour Combe

Date of Paper: 20.12.1918
Surname: Combe
First Name(s): Henry Christian Seymour
Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Regiment: Royal Horse Guards
Home Address: Strathconon, Ross-shire

Capt. (A./Maj.) H.C.S. Combe, Royal Horse Guards, attd. Tank Corps. – For conspicuous gallantry while in the command of a company of 14 tanks. He carried out an operation which was extremely difficult owing to the nature of the ground, deployed his tanks and supervised their movements under heavy shell fire. Throughout the engagement he kept in closest touch with his tanks, his coolness and judgement being the direct means of enabling the infantry with whom he was working to reach their objectives with very few casualties.

The above notice appeared in a recent issue of the London Gazette. Henry Christian Seymour Combe, whose photo. appears to-day, is the eldest son of Captain and Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, Ross-shire. Born in London on 28th February, 1891, Lieut.-Colonel Combe (to give him the rank he holds in the Tank Corps.) was educated at Eton and Sandhurst. He was gazetted in 1910, and entered the Royal Horse Guards, Blue. He went to France in September, 1914, and was wounded, not seriously, in the same year. He volunteered for the Tank Corps. Subsequently serving with the Tank Corps, he was promoted Major in charge of a company, and later on in August, 1918, as stated, was promoted Lieut.-Colonel, and given a Tank Battalion. Lieut-Colonel Combe is well known and highly esteemed on the Strathconon property, to which, before the war, he was a regular visitor. He has a greart love for the Highlands and Highlanders. The tenantry of the estate are greatly gratified by the distinction he has added to an honoured name.

Captain and Lady Jane Combe’s younger son. Lieut. John S. C. Combe, has served with the 11th Hussars during the war

See entry below for details of his brother John S. C. Combe

Photo: #6506

Combe John F B, Lieut, Strathconon

Lieutenant John S. C. Combe

Date of Paper: 20.121918
Surname: Combe
First Name(s): John S C
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: 11th Hussars
Home Address: Strathconon, Ross-shire

Capt. (A./Maj.) H.C.S. Combe, Royal Horse Guards, attd. Tank Corps. – For conspicuous gallantry while in the command of a company of 14 tanks. He carried out an operation which was extremely difficult owing to the nature of the ground, deployed his tanks and supervised their movements under heavy shell fire. Throughout the engagement he kept in closest touch with his tanks, his coolness and judgement being the direct means of enabling the infantry with whom he was working to reach their objectives with very few casualties.

The above notice appeared in a recent issue of the London Gazette. Henry Christian Seymour Combe, whose photo. appears to-day, is the eldest son of Captain and Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, Ross-shire. Born in London on 28th February, 1891, Lieut.-Colonel Combe (to give him the rank he holds in the Tank Corps.) was educated at Eton and Sandhurst. He was gazetted in 1910, and entered the Royal Horse Guards, Blue. He went to France in September, 1914, and was wounded, not seriously, in the same year. He volunteered for the Tank Corps. Subsequently serving with the Tank Corps, he was promoted Major in charge of a company, and later on in August, 1918, as stated, was promoted Lieut.-Colonel, and given a Tank Battalion. Lieut-Colonel Combe is well known and highly esteemed on the Strathconon property, to which, before the war, he was a regular visitor. He has a greart love for the Highlands and Highlanders. The tenantry of the estate are greatly gratified by the distinction he has added to an honoured name.

Captain and Lady Jane Combe’s younger son. Lieut. John S. C. Combe, has served with the 11th Hussars during the war

See entry above for details of his brother Henry C. S. Combe

Photo: #6507

Macdonald Charles, Pte, Strathconon

Private Charles Macdonald

Date of Paper: 03.03.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Charles
Rank: Private
Regiment: Scots Guards
Home Address: Strathconon

We reproduce on this page the photographs of three soldier sons of the late Mr Charles Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Strathconon. Corporal Duncan Macdonald and Lance Corporal Hugh Macdonald are both members of the 4th Seaforths, of which regiment they have been units for eight years, Duncan joining when he was 17, and Hugh when he was 15 years of age. They were both with the regiment at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, following which they were home for a short period of sick leave. They returned to France, but Duncan was again unfortunate, and had to return to England suffering from appendicitis. Hugh was present at the battle of Loos where he was wounded. He has made a good recovery, and is now with his brother at Ripon. Both are excellent shots. Big strapping fellows, they are well known athletes, and were good shinty players. In civil life they are gardeners, following the footsteps of their grandfather, the late Mr Duncan Maciver, for so many years gardener to Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, and to Mr A. J. Balfour, the former proprieter of Strathconon.

Private Charles Macdonald is in the Scots Guards. He was employed in Demerara at the outbreak of war. He came home to enlist. He has been at the front for over a year, and although he was wounded at Ypres, he was not sent home, recovering from his injuries in France. He is a fine specimen of the Highlander, standing 6 ft 6 inches in his stocking soles. Another son has just joined the colours, and a fifth, a twin, is only waiting till he is of age. Mrs Macdonald is proud of her soldier sons, and she has many sympathisers in her anxiety as to their welfare.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6504

Macdonald Duncan, Corp, Strathconon

Corporal Duncan Macdonald

Date of Paper: 03.03.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Strathconon

We reproduce on this page the photographs of three soldier sons of the late Mr Charles Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Strathconon. Corporal Duncan Macdonald and Lance Corporal Hugh Macdonald are both members of the 4th Seaforths, of which regiment they have been units for eight years, Duncan joining when he was 17, and Hugh when he was 15 years of age. They were both with the regiment at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, following which they were home for a short period of sick leave. They returned to France, but Duncan was again unfortunate, and had to return to England suffering from appendicitis. Hugh was present at the battle of Loos where he was wounded. He has made a good recovery, and is now with his brother at Ripon. Both are excellent shots. Big strapping fellows, they are well known athletes, and were good shinty players. In civil life they are gardeners, following the footsteps of their grandfather, the late Mr Duncan Maciver, for so many years gardener to Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, and to Mr A. J. Balfour, the former proprieter of Strathconon.

Private Charles Macdonald is in the Scots Guards. He was employed in Demerara at the outbreak of war. He came home to enlist. He has been at the front for over a year, and although he was wounded at Ypres, he was not sent home, recovering from his injuries in France. He is a fine specimen of the Highlander, standing 6 ft 6 inches in his stocking soles. Another son has just joined the colours, and a fifth, a twin, is only waiting till he is of age. Mrs Macdonald is proud of her soldier sons, and she has many sympathisers in her anxiety as to their welfare.

See entry below and entry above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6505

Macdonald Hugh, L Corp, Strathconon

Lance Corporal Hugh Macdonald

Date of Paper: 03.03.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Strathconon

We reproduce on this page the photographs of three soldier sons of the late Mr Charles Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Strathconon. Corporal Duncan Macdonald and Lance Corporal Hugh Macdonald are both members of the 4th Seaforths, of which regiment they have been units for eight years, Duncan joining when he was 17, and Hugh when he was 15 years of age. They were both with the regiment at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, following which they were home for a short period of sick leave. They returned to France, but Duncan was again unfortunate, and had to return to England suffering from appendicitis. Hugh was present at the battle of Loos where he was wounded. He has made a good recovery, and is now with his brother at Ripon. Both are excellent shots. Big strapping fellows, they are well known athletes, and were good shinty players. In civil life they are gardeners, following the footsteps of their grandfather, the late Mr Duncan Maciver, for so many years gardener to Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, and to Mr A. J. Balfour, the former proprieter of Strathconon.

Private Charles Macdonald is in the Scots Guards. He was employed in Demerara at the outbreak of war. He came home to enlist. He has been at the front for over a year, and although he was wounded at Ypres, he was not sent home, recovering from his injuries in France. He is a fine specimen of the Highlander, standing 6 ft 6 inches in his stocking soles. Another son has just joined the colours, and a fifth, a twin, is only waiting till he is of age. Mrs Macdonald is proud of her soldier sons, and she has many sympathisers in her anxiety as to their welfare.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6508

Macdonald James, Sgt, Strathconon

Sergeant James Macdonald

Date of Paper: 21.12.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): James
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Bridgend, Strathconon

As briefly announced last week, Sergeant James Macdonald, Seaforths (whose photograph is reproduced today), was killed in action on November 22nd. Deceased hailed from Bridgend, Strathconon, where his sister and brothers reside. One of the Ross-shire Territorials, he mobilised in August, 1914, went to France in November of the same year, and shared with his battalion the strenuous work of holding the line until, with the Indian Corps, he shared in the severe infantry fighting at Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge, etc., subsequently taking part in the great battles in which the Highland Territorial Division was engaged. In one famous fight he was in a selected company told to hold an important position, a task which was successfully accomplished. A fine, stalwart Highlander, courageous and daring, he was one of the few remaining links connecting the 1914 B.E.F. men with those who came later to fill the gaps. He will be much missed in the battalion, and there are many in the Glen of Strathconon who will mourn his loss, while deep sympathy will go out to the bereaved sister and brothers.

In civil life Sergt. Macdonald was associated in business with his brother at Strathconon, where together they carried on business as tailors and clothiers for the widely scattered district.

Captain George W. K. Macpherson (Dingwall), in a letter to Miss Macdonald, says: “It only remains for me to convey to you the warmest sympathy of the officers and men of this company in your bereavement. During the recent operations, your brother acted as Company Sergeant Major, and his experience and coolness under heavy fire were of great help to us all. He was killed on November 22nd during a counter-attack by greatly superior numbers of the enemy, while he was making a gallant stand against heavy odds. He was shot through the heart by a bullet, and died immediately without suffering, in the midst of several of his friends. It has been truly said that on that day we lost the flower of our battalion, and it is certainly true of your brother that he was one of the best non-commissioned officers in the company. He invariably remained cool and calm, and he was one on whom everyone relied. He was a most capable soldier, and a very able leader, and was very popular with the men, who trusted him entirely. All the officers of this company held him in high esteem as a non commissioned officer, and today our company is poorer by his loss. I realise to some extent how much he must have meant to you, and how very real your loss must be, and so today, while realising that God alone can afford all comfort, I do not hesitate to voice our deepest sympathy, knowing how much even human sympathy means in such sorrow.”