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Photo: #6048

Bain Henry, Pte, Dingwall

Private Henry Bain

Date of Paper: 03.01.1919
Surname: Bain
First Name(s): Henry
Rank: Private
Regiment: 8th Canadians
Home Address: Fluchlady, Dingwall

THE LATE PRIVATE HENRY BAIN, CANADIANS

Today we publish the photographs of two sons of Mrs Colin Bain, Fluchlady, Dingwall, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice while serving with the Forces in France. Pte. Henry Bain, A Coy, 8th Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles) went to France last year, and was only about four weeks there when he was killed. Lt Miller, writing to his mother, says: “While I was leading the platoon over to the left on the morning of the 8th Sept, we were under very heavy machine gun and shell fire, and it was shell fire which caught your son and several others just as we reached a comparatively safe place. He and four others were instantly killed, which in its suddenness and painlessness, is some slight consolation. He was buried in Haynecourt Cemetry the following day. The exact place where he fell is due north of Haynecourt, mile just to the right of the road leading into the main Douai, Cambrai road. Your son was a good lad, and died an honourable death fighting. Pte. Bain was 33 years of age, and emigrated to Canada about 7 years ago, where he engaged in farming. Well-known in Strathpeffer and Dingwall as a groom, he at one time was the driver of the four-in-hand excursion coach run from Strathpeffer. A singularly fine young man, a loyal friend and comrade, his death is greatly regretted by all who knew him.

His younger brother, Seaman John Bain, has been over two years serving with the Royal Navy, and has seen considerable service in the North Sea and in other waters. He is 23 years of age and was a plumber with Mr Dan. Mackenzie, Dingwall before enlisting.

In connection with the above notice, it is a sad coincidence that a brother of Mrs Bain, Pte. Alex. George Mackintosh, was killed on the same day in France as her son Henry. Pte. Mackintosh was also serving in the Canadians, and was 39 years of age. He was a blacksmith to trade, and served his apprenticeship at Marybank, Fairburn. Serving in the South African War with the Scottish Horse, he returned to this country and worked on his own account as a blacksmith at Conon-Bridge. He emigrated to Canada about ten years ago, and was in business in New York before enlisting.

Deceased leaves a young family, who are in charge of a sister, Mrs Rod. Davidson, 135 W., 67th Street, New York, U.S.A. His wife, who was a daughter of Mr and Mrs Urquhart, Arcan Cottage, Muir of Ord, died two years ago.

See below for details of his younger brother John Bain

Photo: #6086

Bain John, Seaman, Dingwall

Seaman John Bain

Date of Paper: 03.01.1919
Surname: Bain
First Name(s): John
Rank: Seaman
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: Fluchlady, Dingwall

THE LATE PRIVATE HENRY BAIN, CANADIANS

Today we publish the photographs of two sons of Mrs Colin Bain, Fluchlady, Dingwall, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice while serving with the Forces in France. Pte. Henry Bain, A Coy, 8th Battalion (Winnipeg Rifles) went to France last year, and was only about four weeks there when he was killed. Lt Miller, writing to his mother, says: “While I was leading the platoon over to the left on the morning of the 8th Sept, we were under very heavy machine gun and shell fire, and it was shell fire which caught your son and several others just as we reached a comparatively safe place. He and four others were instantly killed, which in its suddenness and painlessness, is some slight consolation. He was buried in Haynecourt Cemetry the following day. The exact place where he fell is due north of Haynecourt, mile just to the right of the road leading into the main Douai, Cambrai road. Your son was a good lad, and died an honourable death fighting. Pte. Bain was 33 years of age, and emigrated to Canada about 7 years ago, where he engaged in farming. Well-known in Strathpeffer and Dingwall as a groom, he at one time was the driver of the four-in-hand excursion coach run from Strathpeffer. A singularly fine young man, a loyal friend and comrade, his death is greatly regretted by all who knew him.

His younger brother, Seaman John Bain, has been over two years serving with the Royal Navy, and has seen considerable service in the North Sea and in other waters. He is 23 years of age and was a plumber with Mr Dan. Mackenzie, Dingwall before enlisting.

In connection with the above notice, it is a sad coincidence that a brother of Mrs Bain, Pte. Alex. George Mackintosh, was killed on the same day in France as her son Henry. Pte. Mackintosh was also serving in the Canadians, and was 39 years of age. He was a blacksmith to trade, and served his apprenticeship at Marybank, Fairburn. Serving in the South African War with the Scottish Horse, he returned to this country and worked on his own account as a blacksmith at Conon-Bridge. He emigrated to Canada about ten years ago, and was in business in New York before enlisting.

Deceased leaves a young family, who are in charge of a sister, Mrs Rod. Davidson, 135 W., 67th Street, New York, U.S.A. His wife, who was a daughter of Mr and Mrs Urquhart, Arcan Cottage, Muir of Ord, died two years ago.

See above for details of his older brother Henry Bain and below for details supplied by Maureen Foster

In June 2018 Maureen Foster, grand-daughter of John Bain, Gairloch, sent a photograph and information.

She writes: “Almost 100 years ago, on 11 June 1918, my Grandfather, John Bain, sailed from Cosham, Portsmouth, to take part in World War 1. At 21 years of age, and almost certainly conscripted, he enlisted on 17 November 1917 and became a Gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery 512 Siege Battery, although his regiment was broken up and he served in 32 Siege Battery. His two older brothers, Donald Bain (Lovat Scouts) and James Bain (4th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders) had also seen action in the war. All three survived.”

Photo: #6061

Cameron Kenneth, Pte, Dingwall

Private Kenneth Cameron

Date of Paper: 15.06.1917
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths (Regulars)
Home Address: Dochcarty, Dingwall

DOCHCARTY SEAFORTH KILLED

Pte. Kenneth, Cameron, Seaforths (Regulars), who has been officially reported missing since 11th April, is the son of the late Mr Alexander Cameron and of Mrs Cameron, Heights of Dochcarty, Dingwall. He is 34 years of age, and joined up in June, 1916, proceeding to the Western Front in September last. Pte Cameron was a gamekeeper with Baron Schroder, Attadale, and latterly with Lady Macdonald, Kinloch, Broadford.

Since the above was in type, information has been received that Pte. Cameron was killed in action. The Rev. J. Kirk, Chaplain to the Battalion writes to his sister: “I am very sorry to tell you that the mystery about the fate of your brother, Pte. K. Cameron, has been dispelled by the finding of his body. He must have been killed on 11th April. The ground, when he and others were lost on 11th April, was won from the enemy on 12th May, and since then the troops now there have recovered many bodies of our missing and buried them.

Your brother’s body was one of those found and buried. Your brother fell in action near Arras, and somewhere there he will have been buried. This is very sad news for you. But I pray that God will enable you to accept your sorrow and loss with brave resignation, in the same brave spirit as your brother met his death.”

A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6071

Campbell Sweeton, Pte, Dingwall

Private Sweeton Campbell

Date of Paper: 19.05.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Sweeton
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Alma Cottage, Dingwall

THE LATE PTE. SWEETON CAMPBELL, DINGWALL

The late Private Sweeton Campbell, Canadian Infantry, son of Mr and Mrs Neil Campbell, Alma Cottage, Dingwall, who was killed in action on 12th March, 1916, was 24 years of age. He came to Britain with the 2nd Canadian Cont., and soon afterwards, without an opportunity of visiting his parents in Dingwall, was drafted to the First Canadian Contingent, then on the Western front. A fine type of soldier, he was held in high esteem by his comrades, to whom his death was a severe loss.

When Private Campbell was born his father was in service with the late Mr Arras, Fodderty, and as a boy the young soldier attended Fodderty Public School. Subsequently he became a farm servant and five years ago, when working with Captain Ian Forsyth at Balintraid, he decided to emigrate to Canada, where, married to a daughter of Mr and Mrs Watson, Balnagore, Fearn, he was making headway when war broke out. A photograph of deceased appears to-day.

Photo: #6070

Clunas Roderick R, Pte, Dingwall

Private Roderick Ross Clunas

Date of Paper: 26.11.1915
Surname: Clunas
First Name(s): Roderick Ross
Rank: Private
Regiment: G (Alness) Coy. Seaforths
Home Address: Brae Farm, Dingwall

The above is a portrait of 1121 Private Roderick Ross Clunas, G (Alness) Coy., who, as intimated in our last issue, was wounded on 8th November, and died the same day in the Merville Hospital, and was buried in the Merville Cemetery.

Private Clunas was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs John Clunas, Brae Farm, Dingwall, and was married to Miss Johan McBain about two years ago, who has resided with her deceased husband’s parents ever since the war commenced. Prior to the war Private Clunas, who was a farm servant, was employed with Mr Fraser Kennedy, Gollanfield, but previously had seen service under the late Mr Fraser, forester, Ardross, and also at Woodlands, Dingwall. It was while at Ardross that he joined the Alness Company, and immediately the call came he courageously reported himself for duty. A strapping young fellow of 26 years, amiable, energetic, and painstaking in his duties, both civil and military, he was a general favourite.

Photo: #6741

Coe J George, Lieut, Beauly

Lieutenant George Coe

Date of Paper: 01.11.1918
Surname: Coe
First Name(s): J. George
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Cliviger, Burnsley

A photograph of Lieut. George Coe, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Coe, Causeway House, Cliviger, Burnsley, and formerly of Tulloch, Dingwall, is reproduced to-day. As recently reported, Lt. Coe died on the 1st October of wounds received in action the previous day.

Major P. C. Robertson, writing from the battalion to Mrs Coe, says: “Dear Mrs Coe – I am writing to offer my own and the sympathy of the battalion on the loss of your son. He went in to action in command of his company and was leading in an attack on a very strong point, when he was shot through the chest. He was taken to the dressing station, but, unfortunately, died of his wounds. He is greatly missed in his company, and in the battalion where he always set a fine example to his men.”

Lt. A. J. Macdonald, Seaforths, a fellow officer, and a son of Mr Macdonald, Tulloch, Dingwall, writes: “It was on the forth day of a successful advance that we came under heavy machine gun fire and your son was badly hit, gallantly leading his company forward. I had known your son for the past four months and, although not in the same company as he, we shared together times of difficulty and danger alike with times of happiness, and he was ever cheerful and smiling – a son truly to be proud of. He was as splendid a soldier as he was a thorough gentleman. At all times he was inspiration to his men – an officer who helped to make his battalion the splendid one it is. By his death a great void has been left in our midst – he was so universally liked. He died as he lived, nobly giving his all in the cause of mankind which he held so sacred.”

The Burnley Express, in a biographical note says: “Mr Coe is well known and highly respected on the Ormerod estate, and his son, who was 28 years of age, was also widely known and esteemed. He came from Scotland and was educated at Dingwall Academy, and on coming to this district attended the Burnley Grammar School. From school he entered the services of the Bank of Liverpool, where he had been for nine years. The deceased was a fine all-round sportsman.”

The Burnley News says: “Lt. Coe was employed by the Bank of Liverpool in Burnley and was held in such high esteem by the bank authorities that he was given charge of the sub-branches in the town. His charming disposition made him a general favourite with the whole of his colleagues.”
Lt. Coe joined up in November 1915, enlisting as a private in the Sportsman Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment, to the men of which many commissions were granted. Lt. Coe was gazetted to the 4th Seaforths in 1917. He served at Ripon for sometime, where he enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all ranks. In May, 1917, he went to France just after the battle of Arras. He was wounded two months later, and after recovering rejoined his unit in April last. On returning to France he was posted to the unit with which he fell, a unit which made [remainder obliterated].

Photo: #5983

Davidson A J, 2 Lieut, Dingwall

Second Lieutenant A. J. Davidson

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Davidson
First Name(s): A. J.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Dingwall

THE LATE 2/LIEUT. A. J. DAVIDSON, DINGWALL

Reproduced to-day is a photograph of the late 2/Lieut. A. J. Davidson, Seaforths, who, as reported last week, was killed in action on the 9th April, while on his way, slightly wounded, to a field dressing station. A sketch of Lt. Davidson’s career was given last week. He was a son of the late Mr Davidson, retired schoolmaster of Lochalsh, who died in Dingwall some years ago, and of the late Mrs Davidson, Dingwall. Before the war he was a class teacher of great repute in Dingwall Academy, and he is mourned sincerely by a wide circle of friends. In the U.F. Church, Dingwall, on Sunday, the Rev. Ranald Macdonald made feeling reference to the late Lt. Davidson, and in course of a restrained appreciation, read passages from a remarkable, characteristic, and imperishable letter, written some hours before going into battle, which the deceased left to be forwarded to his sister should he fail to win through. The sanctity of domestic sorrow is not surely invaded by the publication of these passages:

“In twenty-four hours we go out to face the enemy, and feel constrained to write you a few words, not farewell ones I hope and pray, but you can understand that there are thoughts and feelings to which I would give expression. . . . If it be God’s will that we do not meet again on earth, you must not mourn for me as having left you for ever. Whatever happens I am all right. Should I fall in the fight in my country’s great cause, then I would like that the great feeling in your heart was one of pride that your brother was privileged to lay down his life – a willing sacrifice – for his country’s good:

Nothing is here for tears,
Nothing to wail or knock the breast,
No weakness, no contempt,
Dispraise or blame, nothing but well and fair
And what may quiet us in a death so noble.

“We are going into the fight, confident in the righteousness of our cause. God give me strength to lead my men fearlessly; that is my prayer. I know it must be yours.”

Photo: #6014

Dempster Charles G, Gunner, Dingwall

Gunner Charles George Dempster

Date of Paper: 21.04.1916
Surname: Dempster
First Name(s): Charles
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery
Home Address: Hill Terrace, Dingwall

Dingwall is proud of every one of its sons who have and are doing their duty with the colours at this crisis, but more particularly are they interested in families who have several sons serving. This is the case in the family of Mr and Mrs Dempster, Hill Street, Dingwall, whose three sons are on active service. Their portraits are given above.

Gunner Charles George Dempster (22) is the third son, and he belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery. He was a barber to trade, and for some years with Mr F. Urquhart, Dingwall. Having a notion for the artillery he enlisted in February, 1914, and was sent to France on the outbreak of war, and where he is at present. He is attached to an anti-aircraft battery, and as a proof that his battery has been doing good work, he was just sent home a souvenir in the [remainder obliterated].

Handwritten notes:
“Chas. Dempster, R.H.A., killed April 1918”
“Wm Dempster, Seaforths, discharged”
“J. Dempster still in France 27.5.18. Killed 28.8.18”

See entries below for details of his brothers John Dempster and William Dempster

Photo: #6055

Dempster John, Pte, Dingwall

Private John Dempster

Date of Paper: 21.04.1916
Surname: Dempster
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Scots Greys
Home Address: Hill Terrace, Dingwall

Dingwall is proud of every one of its sons who have and are doing their duty with the colours at this crisis, but more particularly are they interested in families who have several sons serving. This is the case in the family of Mr and Mrs Dempster, Hill Street, Dingwall, whose three sons are on active service. Their portraits are given above.

Private John Dempster (26), the oldest son, is in the Scots Greys. Previous to the war he was for five years groom with Sir Hector Munro of Foulis, Bart., and for four and a half years groom with Colonel Macleod of Dalvey, Forres. He enlisted in 1914, and is now in France.

Handwritten notes:
“Chas. Dempster, R.H.A., killed April 1918”
“Wm Dempster, Seaforths, discharged”
“J. Dempster still in France 27.5.18. Killed 28.8.18”

See entry above for details of his brother Charles Dempster and entry below for William Dempster

Photo: #6075

Dempster William, Pte, Dingwall

Private William Dempster

Soldiers Details

Dingwall is proud of every one of its sons who have and are doing their duty with the colours at this crisis, but more particularly are they interested in families who have several sons serving. This is the case in the family of Mr and Mrs Dempster, Hill Street, Dingwall, whose three sons are on active service. Their portraits are given above.

Private William Dempster (24), belongs to the 4th Seaforths, which regiment he joined on mobilisation. He went to France with the battalion in November, 1914, and received his first baptism of fire at Neuve Chapelle, where he was wounded. Up till a few weeks ago he was in hospital but now has so far recovered as to be able to join the third line of his regiment. He is a draper by trade, and was for five years in the employment of the late ex-Provost Stewart, draper, Dingwall.

Handwritten notes:
“Chas. Dempster, R.H.A., killed April 1918”
“Wm Dempster, Seaforths, discharged”
“J. Dempster still in France 27.5.18. Killed 28.8.18”

See entries above for details of his brothers John Dempster and Charles Dempster

No photo available

Private William Dey

Date of Paper: 04.10.1918
Surname: Dey
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Mountgerald, Dingwall

THE LATE PRIVATE WILLIAM DEY, MOUNTGERALD, DINGWALL

Pte. William Dey, (850042) Canadians, whose photo, appears to-day, and who, as already recorded, died of wounds on 30th August, 1918, was a son of Mr and Mrs Dey, Mountgerald, Dingwall. The day he received his death wound and the day of his death, before going into action, he sent a field post card to his mother, to whom he was devotedly attached. His wounds were fatal. He was hit on the thigh, face and right side.

Joining up early in the war, after a period of training in Canada, he was drafted to England early in 1917 and in August of that year was sent to France. There he shared from the beginning in the heavy fighting which invariably centres round the Canadians in France, and passed through all unscathed. He took part in the battles of July and August to meet his death wounds in a great advance.

Deceased was a splendid type of sturdy Highland Colonial, and had the confidence and friendship of officers and men of his unit by whom and by those who recall him as a lad in Dingwall he is greatly regretted. Sympathy with the parents and members of the family is sincere.

Deceased served four years with Mr Wm. Macmillan, merchant, Dingwall. Emigrating to Canada he was engaged in fruit farming when he joined up. An elder brother holds an important appointment under the Board of Trade in Glasgow, and a sister, Miss Annie Dey, is a war nurse in France.

Another sister is the wife of a distinguished Gordon Highlander, Major Mackie, D.C.M., M.C., a true Gordon veteran; perhaps with the longest continuous service on the Gordon records to-day . He joined the army over 30 years ago, served in the ranks, became a N.C.O., and rose to commissioned rank. Most of his service has been abroad. He is one of the Dargai Gordons. It was there he received the D.C.M., and he served also through the Boer War. He won the M.C., which he received at the hands of the King at Buckingham Palace last Autumn.

Photo: #6072

Dingwall Thomas, Pte, Dingwall

Private Thomas Dingwall

Date of Paper: 20.07.1917
Surname: Dingwall
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Private
Regiment: S. African Scottish Infantry
Home Address: 4, Greenhill Trerrace, Dingwall.

THE LATE PTE. THOMAS DINGWALL, SOUTH AFRICANS

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of the late Pte. Thomas Dingwall, South African Scottish Infantry, son of Mr John Dingwall, storeman, and Mrs Dingwall, 4 Greenhill Terrace, Dingwall, who was killed in action during a bombardment on the Western Front on 13th July, 1916.

Pte. Dingwall emigrated to South Africa six years ago, where he was employed in Johannesburg as a painter. Before leaving Dingwall he was employed with Mr James Mackenzie. When war broke out Pte. Dingwall joined the South African Scottish, and took part with Botha’s forces in the German South-West African campaign. On its completion he volunteered for service in England, and came over to England in October, 1915, proceeding first to Egypt, and subsequently coming to France.

Twenty-nine years of age when killed, Pte. Dingwall was a fine type of Scottish Highlander, whose pluck and patriotism are alike proved by his record of service and final sacrifice.

Deceased was buried near the lines behind a wood of historic name in this war. Dingwall Freemasons will recall Pte. Dingwall as a member of the craft and a son of Mother Fingal.

Photo: #6053

Dunbar James L, Pte, Dingwall

Private James Laurie Dunbar

Date of Paper: 28.06.1918
Surname: Dunbar
First Name(s): James Laurie
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: The Armoury, Dingwall

Pte. James Laurie Dunbar, Royal Scots, whose photograph appears to-day, who was officially reported a prisoner of war, has written from Germany stating that he is a prisoner of war and wounded.

The son of Sergt. Major and Mrs Dunbar, late of the Armoury, Dingwall, and the grandson of Mrs Fraser, Nicol’s Court, Dingwall, Pte. Laurie Dunbar was only 15 -1/2 years when he joined up on the outbreak of war, and was employed on home service in England and Ireland until he attained military age, when he went to France. An old Dingwall Academy boy, it is hoped he may soon recover from his wounds and return to Blighty.

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