Dingwall WW I Page 4

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Photo: #6088

Macgillvray Alexander, Sgt, Dingwall

Sergeant Alexander Macgillivray

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Macgillivray
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: B (Dingwall) Coy., Seaforths
Home Address: Victoria Place, Dingwall

Macgillivray, Sergt. Alexander, 1832, B (Dingwall) Coy., wounded 10th March, died 12th March, 1915; aged 28 years; elder son of Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, Victoria Place, Dingwall. Rejoined on mobilisation. Clerk to the late ex-Provost John Macrae, solicitor, Dingwall, and subsequently with Messrs C & J Urquhart, ironmongers, Dingwall. Well- known vocalist.

See entry below for details of his younger brother Donald Macgillivray

Photo: #6092

Macgillivray Donald, Sgt, Dingwall

Sergeant Donald Macgillivray

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916 and 21.09.1918
Surname: Macgillivray
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address: Victoria Place, Dingwall

THE LATE SGT. D. MACGILLIVRAY, DINGWALL

As was briefly reported last week, a second great sorrow has befallen Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, Victoria Place, Dingwall, whose well-beloved son, Sgt. Donald Macgillivray, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action on the Western Front on 2nd September. Writing to the mother on 8th inst., the O/C of the dead soldier’s company says: “Dear Mrs Macgillivray – I am afraid that you will have already received the sad news of the death of your son. I write to give you what information I may and to offer you what consolation I can. On the night of the 2nd inst. a shell burst on company headquarters and Sgt. Macgillivray, with several others, was killed on the spot. I saw them all immediately afterwards, and I could find no trace of wounds on your son. He was quite dead, with his friend, Sgt. Cameron, on the one side and the Company Sergt. Major on the other. All three had died through the concussion due to the bursting of the shell. They were buried next morning in the grey of the dawn and now proper crosses stand at the head of each grave. I knew your son in the 14th, and he was one of my best and trusted sergeants here. In addition to his [obliterated] and abilities as a soldier, I admired the cleanliness and uprightrness of the man. He was a truly excellent example of a soldier and a gentleman. We miss him very much in the company. I am the only officer left who knew him well, and I extend to you my sincerest sympathy in your great sorrow. May the great Consoler be close to you and in your grief may you know God’s peace.”

His officer’s letter speaks well and gracefully and with tenderness and understanding of the late Sergt. Donald Macgillivray, and he leaves to those who knew him only as a bright, intelligent, happy youth, very little to say. Donald Macgillivray was a dutiful, loyal, and kindly son, whose tenderness to the home intensified with the passing of his brother, Sergt. Alex. Macgillivray, Seaforths, one of a bright band of Dingwall youths who hastened to the colours on the call to arms and who made the supreme sacrifice on the blood soaked fields of Neuve Chapelle.

The Chaplain of the battalion (Rev. Wm. Jardine), in a letter to Mrs Macgillivray, says: “I knew Sergt. Macgillivray well. He was one of the well-known figures in the battalion, and was a general favourite. We are all very sorry about his death, and I am writing in name of a great many people in conveying this message of sympathy. I know his death will be a dreadful blow to you. I trust that you may have the comfort of God in your sore sorrow, and that you may be able to cherish the hope that we have in Jesus Christ [obliterated].”

See entry above for details of his older brother Alexander Macgillivray

Photo: #6028

Macgregor John, Lieut, Dingwall

Lieutenant John Macgregor

Date of Paper: 05.04.1918
Surname: Macgregor
First Name(s): John
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Canadian Infantry
Home Address: Burn Place, Dingwall

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Burn Place, Dingwall, all of whom, like so many more in the North, voluntarily went to war in the earlier days of it or joined up as they reached the age.

Lt. John Macgregor, Canadian Infantry, is well remembered by Dingwall folk. Before going to Canada he was a clerk with Messrs Duncan & Duncan, solicitors. While in Dingwall he took a deep interest in various organisations in the old town by the Peffery. He was a member of the old Operatic Society, the Gaelic choir, the darkie troupe, and shared in many other efforts in his native town. He also took a keen interest in sport, being secretary of the old-time Victoria United Football Club, and a member of the Wester Ross shinty team. When war broke out, the old Highland spirit showed up, with the result that he crossed to England and thence to France. While there he showed great ability, attaining the rank of sergeant. About two years ago he was recommended for a commission. He is at present under medical treatment, having broken his ankle while instructing in trenching.

Bom. Murdo Macgregor, R.G.A., has, perhaps, seen more service than any of the brothers. Before the war he joined the Ross Mountain Battery. At mobilisation he went to Galipoli with his unit, taking part in the landing there. After the evacuation Bom. Macgregor went to Egypt, and subsequently to Salonica, where he has been for some considerable time. Few young soldiers have seen as much service as Murdo, and everybody will wish him the best of luck, and – “Leave” to which so far he has been a stranger.

L./Cpl. William Macgregor, the youngest of the family, is at present somewhere in Scotland with the Seaforths. He served with Messrs. D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., until he came of military ge, and thereupon joined the Army. He was home recently on leave. He makes a typical Highland soldier, and he received many congratulations on his promotion to L./Cpl., after so short a time in the Army.

Another son, Pte. Roderick Macgregor, mobilised with the County Territorials at the outbreak of war, went to France in 1914, and served there until invalided, when he returned to civil life, in which he is a grocer.

Mr and Mrs Macgregor may well feel proud of their boys, and all friends of the family will wish them a speedy return to their native town.

Photo: #5992

Macgregor Murdo, Bombardier, Dingwall

Bombardier Murdo Macgregor

Date of Paper: 05.04.1918
Surname: Macgregor
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Bombardier
Regiment: Royal Gun Artillery
Home Address: Burn Place, Dingwall

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Burn Place, Dingwall, all of whom, like so many more in the North, voluntarily went to war in the earlier days of it or joined up as they reached the age.

Lt. John Macgregor, Canadian Infantry, is well remembered by Dingwall folk. Before going to Canada he was a clerk with Messrs Duncan & Duncan, solicitors. While in Dingwall he took a deep interest in various organisations in the old town by the Peffery. He was a member of the old Operatic Society, the Gaelic choir, the darkie troupe, and shared in many other efforts in his native town. He also took a keen interest in sport, being secretary of the old-time Victoria United Football Club, and a member of the Wester Ross shinty team. When war broke out, the old Highland spirit showed up, with the result that he crossed to England and thence to France. While there he showed great ability, attaining the rank of sergeant. About two years ago he was recommended for a commission. He is at present under medical treatment, having broken his ankle while instructing in trenching.

Bom. Murdo Macgregor, R.G.A., has, perhaps, seen more service than any of the brothers. Before the war he joined the Ross Mountain Battery. At mobilisation he went to Galipoli with his unit, taking part in the landing there. After the evacuation Bom. Macgregor went to Egypt, and subsequently to Salonica, where he has been for some considerable time. Few young soldiers have seen as much service as Murdo, and everybody will wish him the best of luck, and – “Leave” to which so far he has been a stranger.

L./Cpl. William Macgregor, the youngest of the family, is at present somewhere in Scotland with the Seaforths. He served with Messrs. D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., until he came of military ge, and thereupon joined the Army. He was home recently on leave. He makes a typical Highland soldier, and he received many congratulations on his promotion to L./Cpl., after so short a time in the Army.

Another son, Pte. Roderick Macgregor, mobilised with the County Territorials at the outbreak of war, went to France in 1914, and served there until invalided, when he returned to civil life, in which he is a grocer.

Mr and Mrs Macgregor may well feel proud of their boys, and all friends of the family will wish them a speedy return to their native town.

No photo available

Private Roderick Macgregor

Date of Paper: 05.04.1918
Surname: Macgregor
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Burn Place, Dingwall

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Burn Place, Dingwall, all of whom, like so many more in the North, voluntarily went to war in the earlier days of it or joined up as they reached the age.

Lt. John Macgregor, Canadian Infantry, is well remembered by Dingwall folk. Before going to Canada he was a clerk with Messrs Duncan & Duncan, solicitors. While in Dingwall he took a deep interest in various organisations in the old town by the Peffery. He was a member of the old Operatic Society, the Gaelic choir, the darkie troupe, and shared in many other efforts in his native town. He also took a keen interest in sport, being secretary of the old-time Victoria United Football Club, and a member of the Wester Ross shinty team. When war broke out, the old Highland spirit showed up, with the result that he crossed to England and thence to France. While there he showed great ability, attaining the rank of sergeant. About two years ago he was recommended for a commission. He is at present under medical treatment, having broken his ankle while instructing in trenching.

Bom. Murdo Macgregor, R.G.A., has, perhaps, seen more service than any of the brothers. Before the war he joined the Ross Mountain Battery. At mobilisation he went to Galipoli with his unit, taking part in the landing there. After the evacuation Bom. Macgregor went to Egypt, and subsequently to Salonica, where he has been for some considerable time. Few young soldiers have seen as much service as Murdo, and everybody will wish him the best of luck, and – “Leave” to which so far he has been a stranger.

L./Cpl. William Macgregor, the youngest of the family, is at present somewhere in Scotland with the Seaforths. He served with Messrs. D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., until he came of military ge, and thereupon joined the Army. He was home recently on leave. He makes a typical Highland soldier, and he received many congratulations on his promotion to L./Cpl., after so short a time in the Army.

Another son, Pte. Roderick Macgregor, mobilised with the County Territorials at the outbreak of war, went to France in 1914, and served there until invalided, when he returned to civil life, in which he is a grocer.

Mr and Mrs Macgregor may well feel proud of their boys, and all friends of the family will wish them a speedy return to their native town.

Photo: #6023

Macgregor Willliam, L Corp, Dingwall

Lance Corporal William Macgregor

Date of Paper: 05.04.1918 and 15.11.1918
Surname: Macgregor
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Burn Place, Dingwall

Date of Paper: 05.04.1918

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Burn Place, Dingwall, all of whom, like so many more in the North, voluntarily went to war in the earlier days of it or joined up as they reached the age.

Lt. John Macgregor, Canadian Infantry, is well remembered by Dingwall folk. Before going to Canada he was a clerk with Messrs Duncan & Duncan, solicitors. While in Dingwall he took a deep interest in various organisations in the old town by the Peffery. He was a member of the old Operatic Society, the Gaelic choir, the darkie troupe, and shared in many other efforts in his native town. He also took a keen interest in sport, being secretary of the old-time Victoria United Football Club, and a member of the Wester Ross shinty team. When war broke out, the old Highland spirit showed up, with the result that he crossed to England and thence to France. While there he showed great ability, attaining the rank of sergeant. About two years ago he was recommended for a commission. He is at present under medical treatment, having broken his ankle while instructing in trenching.

Bom. Murdo Macgregor, R.G.A., has, perhaps, seen more service than any of the brothers. Before the war he joined the Ross Mountain Battery. At mobilisation he went to Galipoli with his unit, taking part in the landing there. After the evacuation Bom. Macgregor went to Egypt, and subsequently to Salonica, where he has been for some considerable time. Few young soldiers have seen as much service as Murdo, and everybody will wish him the best of luck, and – “Leave” to which so far he has been a stranger.

L./Cpl. William Macgregor, the youngest of the family, is at present somewhere in Scotland with the Seaforths. He served with Messrs. D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., until he came of military ge, and thereupon joined the Army. He was home recently on leave. He makes a typical Highland soldier, and he received many congratulations on his promotion to L./Cpl., after so short a time in the Army.

Another son, Pte. Roderick Macgregor, mobilised with the County Territorials at the outbreak of war, went to France in 1914, and served there until invalided, when he returned to civil life, in which he is a grocer.

Mr and Mrs Macgregor may well feel proud of their boys, and all friends of the family will wish them a speedy return to their native town.

Date of Paper: 15.11.1918

Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Ward Cottage, Burn Place, Dingwall, as briefly announced last week, have received a letter from an officer of the battalion which confirms their fears that their son, Lce.-Corpl. William Macgregor, 25136, Seaforths, was killed in action. It will be recalled that a soldier with a Dingwall connection found Lce.-Cpl. Macgregor’s pocket book in the field, and very kindly sent it home through his sister, a Dingwall lady, stating that he got it near a body which he believed to be that of L./Cpl. Macgregor. Lt. J. A. Mackenzie, Seaforths, now writes stating that L.-Cpl. Macgregpr was killed in action on October 1 during an advance in Flanders, and was buried by his comrades, under the superintendence of Lt. A. J. Macdonald, Seaforths (Tulloch, Dingwall). “His death is a great loss to me,” Lt. Mackenzie writes. “He was in every way a splendid soldier, and quite fearless. During the earlier stages of the attack he actually started off to tackle a pill box on his own account, and I had to call him back while I collected men to assist him. He had spoken to me of his desire to obtain a commission, and I had asked him to obtain all the necessary papers, and was prepared to assist him in every way, and had intended promoting him to the rank of corporal at the earliest opportunity. I am personally exceedingly sorry he did not come through and I send you my sincerest sympathy.”

Lance-Corpl. Macgregor’s death will occasion much sincere sorrow to all who knew him. A singularly bright, handsome, manly, smart boy, it seems just the other day since, one of the office staff of Messrs D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., he was hurrying hither and thither on the work of the firm. Later, on leave, everyone remarked on the boy who had suddenly taken the physique and bearing of a man. He was unquestionably as smartly turned out and as well set up, and wore, first, the Argyll and Sutherland, and, latterly, the Seaforth tartans, with all the finished bearing of the aforetime regular. Even before he crossed to France he was marked out for commissioned rank, and the necessary forms were in process of completion, and were on the way to France when he fell. In their bereavement Mr and Mrs Macgregor and family have the full sympathy of the community. Four sons of the family have served with the colours. Captain John Macgregor is with the Canadians; Bom. Murdo Macgregor, Ross Mountain Battery, is temporarily demobilised for special work; and Roderick Macgregor, who crossed to France with the Seaforths in 1914, was subsequently invalided out of the Army.

Photo: #6058

Mackay John, Pte, Dingwall

Private John Mackay

Date of Paper: 15.11.1915
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address: Brae Farm, Dingwall

A photograph of the late Pte. John Mackay, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, appears to-day. His death from wounds was recently reported. The son of Mr and Mrs Mackay, Brae Farm, Dingwall, he went to France in March last. He was then only 18 years and 4 months but the country’s needs was imperative, and many fine brave lads were called this early to face a foe which felt that victory was within their grasp.

Pte. Mackay joined the 51st Division, and with it fought some famous battles both in Flanders and later in July, when by a dramatic movement it suddenly appeared on the southern flank of the Marine salient and heroically shared in those conclusive battles which blasted for ever the German hope. Before joining up Pte. Mackay was employed in a motor garage at Tain; before going to Brae the family resided at Kildary, where the father was a porter on the railway. Another son was badly wounded, and is now in Aberdeen undergoing special treatment.

In a letter to the mother the Rev. Wm. Jardine C.F., says: “I am sorry to have to send you the worst news. Your son Pte. J. Mackay (23630), A Company of the battalion has died of wounds received in action. He was sent down from the field to the dressing station and official word has just come that he died on the 14/10/13.. I know this will be a dreadful blow to you. I trust that you may have the comfort of God in your sorrow, and that you may be able to cherish the great hope in Jesus Christ of meeting your boy again in the Kingdom of Peace.

Photo: #6099

Mackay Kenneth, Sgt, Dingwall

Sergeant Kenneth M. Mackay

Date of Paper: 19.03.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Kenneth M.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: The Gates, Dingwall

Mackay Sergt, Shoemaker Kenneth M., 1955, B (Dingwall) Coy., wounded 11th March, 1915, died of wounds same day; aged 26 years; son of Mr K. Mackay, The Gates, Dingwall; shoemaker of the Tyne, and joined on mobilisation.

No photo available

Private Donald Mackay

Date of Paper: 14.07.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall.

To Mrs Mackay, Stafford Place, Dingwall, has the honour of having sent four sons to the war, one of whom has paid the supreme price and those of whom are still serving. The boys of whom we produce photographs are as follows:

Sergeant Duncan Mackay, (35), the eldest son is with the Seaforths in France. He joined the regiment in April, 1915, and was drafted to France five weeks ago. Previous to the war he was employed with Messrs Wordie and Coy., carting contractors, Dingwall.

Private Murdo Mackay (24), third son was with the Ross Mountain Battery, and is now time expired. He is a plasterer to trade, and is presently employed with Messrs Lemon and Coy., aerated water works. Dingwall.

Private Donald Mackay, who was serving with the 1/4th Seaforths, paid the full sacrifice at the early age of 22. He was a member of the Dingwall Coy. Of the 4th Seaforths at mobilization, and went out to France with the battalion in November, 1914. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed, but on 21st April, 1915 he was wounded in the head by shrapnel. He was sent home to England but never fully recovered, and on 9th July he died in the Colchester military hospital. His remains were brought to Dingwall, and he was interred in Fodderty Churchyard, with full military honours. He was a butcher to trade and was employed by Mr Robert Allan, Dingwall.

Bombardier Thomas Mackay (22), is with the Ross Mountain Battery, to which unit he belonged before the war broke out. Last year he went to the Dardanelles with the Battery, and saw service on the Peninsula. He is now on Egypt.

He was a butcher with Messrs Fraser Bros., Dingwall, previous to mobilisation.

See entries below for details of his brothers Duncan, Murdo and Thomas Mackay

Photo: #6094

Mackay Duncan, Sgt, Dingwall

Sergeant Duncan Mackay

Date of Paper: 14.07.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall

To Mrs Mackay, Stafford Place, Dingwall, has the honour of having sent four sons to the war, one of whom has paid the supreme price and those of whom are still serving. The boys of whom we produce photographs are as follows:

Sergeant Duncan Mackay, (35), the eldest son is with the Seaforths in France. He joined the regiment in April, 1915, and was drafted to France five weeks ago. Previous to the war he was employed with Messrs Wordie and Coy., carting contractors, Dingwall.

Private Murdo Mackay (24), third son was with the Ross Mountain Battery, and is now time expired. He is a plasterer to trade, and is presently employed with Messrs Lemon and Coy., aerated water works. Dingwall.

Private Donald Mackay, who was serving with the 1/4th Seaforths, paid the full sacrifice at the early age of 22. He was a member of the Dingwall Coy. Of the 4th Seaforths at mobilization, and went out to France with the battalion in November, 1914. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed, but on 21st April, 1915 he was wounded in the head by shrapnel. He was sent home to England but never fully recovered, and on 9th July he died in the Colchester military hospital. His remains were brought to Dingwall, and he was interred in Fodderty Churchyard, with full military honours. He was a butcher to trade and was employed by Mr Robert Allan, Dingwall.

Bombardier Thomas Mackay (22), is with the Ross Mountain Battery, to which unit he belonged before the war broke out. Last year he went to the Dardanelles with the Battery, and saw service on the Peninsula. He is now on Egypt.

He was a butcher with Messrs Fraser Bros., Dingwall, previous to mobilisation.

See entries below for details of his brothers Murdo & Thomas and entry above for Donald Mackay

Photo: #6017

Mackay Murdo, Gunner, Dingwall

Private Murdo Mackay

Date of Paper: 14.07.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Private
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall.

To Mrs Mackay, Stafford Place, Dingwall, has the honour of having sent four sons to the war, one of whom has paid the supreme price and those of whom are still serving. The boys of whom we produce photographs are as follows:

Sergeant Duncan Mackay, (35), the eldest son is with the Seaforths in France. He joined the regiment in April, 1915, and was drafted to France five weeks ago. Previous to the war he was employed with Messrs Wordie and Coy., carting contractors, Dingwall.

Private Murdo Mackay (24), third son was with the Ross Mountain Battery, and is now time expired. He is a plasterer to trade, and is presently employed with Messrs Lemon and Coy., aerated water works. Dingwall.

Private Donald Mackay, who was serving with the 1/4th Seaforths, paid the full sacrifice at the early age of 22. He was a member of the Dingwall Coy. Of the 4th Seaforths at mobilization, and went out to France with the battalion in November, 1914. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed, but on 21st April, 1915 he was wounded in the head by shrapnel. He was sent home to England but never fully recovered, and on 9th July he died in the Colchester military hospital. His remains were brought to Dingwall, and he was interred in Fodderty Churchyard, with full military honours. He was a butcher to trade and was employed by Mr Robert Allan, Dingwall.

Bombardier Thomas Mackay (22), is with the Ross Mountain Battery, to which unit he belonged before the war broke out. Last year he went to the Dardanelles with the Battery, and saw service on the Peninsula. He is now on Egypt.

He was a butcher with Messrs Fraser Bros., Dingwall, previous to mobilisation.

See entry below for details of his brother Thomas Mackay and entries above for Duncan & Donald Mackay

No photo available

Bombardier Thomas Mackay

Date of Paper: 14.07.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Bombardier
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall.

To Mrs Mackay, Stafford Place, Dingwall, has the honour of having sent four sons to the war, one of whom has paid the supreme price and those of whom are still serving. The boys of whom we produce photographs are as follows:

Sergeant Duncan Mackay, (35), the eldest son is with the Seaforths in France. He joined the regiment in April, 1915, and was drafted to France five weeks ago. Previous to the war he was employed with Messrs Wordie and Coy., carting contractors, Dingwall.

Private Murdo Mackay (24), third son was with the Ross Mountain Battery, and is now time expired. He is a plasterer to trade, and is presently employed with Messrs Lemon and Coy., aerated water works. Dingwall.

Private Donald Mackay, who was serving with the 1/4th Seaforths, paid the full sacrifice at the early age of 22. He was a member of the Dingwall Coy. Of the 4th Seaforths at mobilization, and went out to France with the battalion in November, 1914. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed, but on 21st April, 1915 he was wounded in the head by shrapnel. He was sent home to England but never fully recovered, and on 9th July he died in the Colchester military hospital. His remains were brought to Dingwall, and he was interred in Fodderty Churchyard, with full military honours. He was a butcher to trade and was employed by Mr Robert Allan, Dingwall.

Bombardier Thomas Mackay (22), is with the Ross Mountain Battery, to which unit he belonged before the war broke out. Last year he went to the Dardanelles with the Battery, and saw service on the Peninsula. He is now on Egypt.

He was a butcher with Messrs Fraser Bros., Dingwall, previous to mobilisation.

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