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Photo: #6040

Gray Donald, Pte, Dingwall

Private Donald Gray

Date of Paper: 28.04.1916
Surname: Gray
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall

Above we reproduce the portrait of 1442 Pte. Donald Gray, B (Dingwall) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, who was killed in action on 21st April, 1915. Deceased was the son of Mrs Gray, Stafford Place, Dingwall, and was a bright, promising lad of 21 years. He will be remembered previous to the war as an assistant to Mr Maclean, bookseller, Dingwall.

His brother, 1972 Pte. John Gray of the same Coy., died on 16th March, 1915, from wounds received at the battle of Neuve Chapelle.

See entry below for details of his brother John Gray

Photo: #6056

Gray John, Pte, Dingwall

Private John Gray

Date of Paper: 10.03.1916
Surname: Gray
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Stafford Place, Dingwall

Gray, Private John, 1972, B Coy., died of wounds, March 1915, aged 27 years. At outbreak of war was brass finisher in Glasgow. Brother, Pte. Donald Gray, 1/4th Seaforths, killed in action 21st April, 1915. Sons of Mrs Gray, Stafford Place, Dingwall.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Gray

Photo: #6013

Macdonald Angus, Gunner, Dingwall

Gunner Angus Macdonald

Date of Paper: 23.04.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Angus
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: R.G.A
Home Address: 2, Coronation Cottage, Warden Street, Dingwall

We reproduce above a photograph of Gunner Angus Macdonald, R.G.A., who met his death on 23rd March, 1916, in an accident which occurred in the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich. Deceased, who was 54 years of age, served over 14 years in the Artillery, and retired some years ago. At the outbreak of war, with true patriotic Highland fervour, he rejoined his old battery. A tall, handsome type of man, he will be well remembered in Dingwall, where he resided for a considerable period some four or five years ago. He was a native of Sutherlandshire, having been born at Assynt, to which place his father, the late Sergeant Kenneth Macdonald, of the 78th, also belonged.

He is survived by a widow and a brother, who is Mr D Macdonald, 2, Coronation Cottage, Warden Street, Dingwall.

Photo: #5995

Macdonald Angus Ray, Capt, Dingwall

Captain Angus Macdonald

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Angus (Ray)
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Craig Road, Dingwall

A photograph appears today of Captain Angus Macgillivray (Ray) Macdonald, M.C., Seaforths, son of Mr Macdonald, late rector, Dingwall Academy, and Mrs Macdonald, Craig Road, Dingwall, As recorded last week, Captain Ray Macdonald fell on the 21st November at the head of his company in the recent advance, dying before he reached the Field Post. He was 24 years of age. A non-commissioned officer of the Seaforths writes:

Almost every week the loss of some dear comrade is reported, bringing home to us with terrible earnestness the awfulness of the present struggle. Today we mourn the loss of one who was bringing honour to his native town and adding laurels to the Seaforth name. And how much he loved the dear old town, and how near to his heart were its old ties only those in constant touch with him can understand. I write of him as a school chum; I knew him better as such than as a soldier, although it was my good fortune to have been long associated with him in both directions. Dear old Ray! The very name brings freshness to the sweetest memories, and his bright smile, his winning ways, and all-round attractiveness appear clearly portrayed at the very mention of it. He was loved in those school days by everyone who came in contact with him, his comradeship was sought by all, for to know him was to love him. Many pages could be filled in chronicling the doings of these bygone days, but to those whose privilege it was to take part in them it is unnecessary to refresh their memories. The knowledge of the passing of the chief actor in most of these scenes is sufficient reminder for all. To his school fellows, who still have the privilege of life, his passing comes as a personal loss, but so long as that life lasts so shall the memory of the boy we all loved so well. As he was in school so also was he in the great Army of today. Just as popular and as brave as he was bright. He took kindly to his life in the Army, and nothing was nearer to his heart than the comfort and care of the men under his command. This was his whole absorbing thought, and how well he gave effect to the thought can best be testified to by the men themselves. Now he has passed into the Great Unknown, where many of his fellows shall greet his arrival, while those who mourn his loss shall face ‘the breaking of the day’ with the expectancy of meeting him over there. Until then, good-bye, dear boy. The sands of time are clearly marked with your footprints, and the pals you have left behind are still endeavouring to emulate and follow your magnificent example. And, if in following they must needs pay the same sacrifice as you have done, they are strengthened in doing so knowing that your bright smile and welcome greeting awaits their passing.

Photo: #6042

Macdonald Donald, Pte, Dingwall

Private Donald Macdonald

Date of Paper: 20.10.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Mountrich, Dingwall

The above are portraits of the two sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Mountrich, Dingwall, Private Donald Macdonald (20), and Private Peter Macdonald (18), both of the Seaforth Highlanders. The elder son went to the front in November, 1914, and has been in France ever since, with the exception of a few weeks when he was invalided home on sick leave. Previous to the war he was a ploughman at Mountrich. The younger son went to France in March this year, and previous to joining the army he was employed by Messrs Low and Coy., Dingwall. He was wounded on 26th July last by shrapnel, but not seriously enough to warrant his being sent home. Both boys are good shots, and are recognised snipers in the battalion.

See entry below for details of his younger brother

Photo: #6067

Macdonald Peter, Pte, Dingwall

Private Peter Macdonald

Date of Paper: 20.10.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Mountrich, Dingwall

The above are portraits of the two sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Mountrich, Dingwall, Private Donald Macdonald (20), and Private Peter Macdonald (18), both of the Seaforth Highlanders. The elder son went to the front in November, 1914, and has been in France ever since, with the exception of a few weeks when he was invalided home on sick leave. Previous to the war he was a ploughman at Mountrich. The younger son went to France in March this year, and previous to joining the army he was employed by Messrs Low and Coy., Dingwall. He was wounded on 26th July last by shrapnel, but not seriously enough to warrant his being sent home. Both boys are good shots, and are recognised snipers in the battalion.

See entry above for details of his older brother Donald Macdonald

Photo: #6057

Macdonald John, Pte, Dingwall

Private John Macdonald

Date of Paper: 05.01.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Ferry Road, Dingwall

TWO WELL KNOWN DINGWALL BOYS

The above are portraits of two sons of Mr Kenneth Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Ferry Road, Dingwall.

Private John Macdonald, Highland Light Infantry, the second son, enlisted in the R.G.A. in May last, and transferred to the H.L.I. He subsequently went to France, and on 1st November he was wounded in the left thigh by shrapnel. He is now in a convalescent home in France, and is progressing well. He is 28 years of age, and prior to enlisting was a gamekeeper in Banffshire.
Gunner Peter Macdonald, Ross Mountain Battery, is 26 years of age, and enlisted in August, 1915, from Skye, where he was a gamekeeper. He will be better remembered as a water bailiff on the Conon, and as a gamekeeper at Fannich before he went to Skye. Last year he joined his unit in the East, and the latest letter to hand states that he is still there. General sympathy will be felt with the father of those two gallant sons, who is, unfortunately, at the present in very poor health.
Two other sons of Mr Macdonald, Duncan and David, are in Government employment.
The former arrived home on leave on Saturday.

See entry below for details of his younger brother Peter Macdonald

Photo: #6018

Macdonald Peter, Gunner, Dingwall

Gunner Peter Macdonald

Date of Paper: 05.01.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Peter
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Ferry Road, Dingwall

TWO WELL KNOWN DINGWALL BOYS

The above are portraits of two sons of Mr Kenneth Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Ferry Road, Dingwall.

Private John Macdonald, Highland Light Infantry, the second son, enlisted in the R.G.A. in May last, and transferred to the H.L.I. He subsequently went to France, and on 1st November he was wounded in the left thigh by shrapnel. He is now in a convalescent home in France, and is progressing well. He is 28 years of age, and prior to enlisting was a gamekeeper in Banffshire.
Gunner Peter Macdonald, Ross Mountain Battery, is 26 years of age, and enlisted in August, 1915, from Skye, where he was a gamekeeper. He will be better remembered as a water bailiff on the Conon, and as a gamekeeper at Fannich before he went to Skye. Last year he joined his unit in the East, and the latest letter to hand states that he is still there. General sympathy will be felt with the father of those two gallant sons, who is, unfortunately, at the present in very poor health.
Two other sons of Mr Macdonald, Duncan and David, are in Government employment.
The former arrived home on leave on Saturday.

See entry above for details of his older brother John Macdonald

Photo: #6068

Macdonald R, Pte, Canada Ex Dingwall

Private R. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 14.04.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): R.
Rank: Private
Regiment: 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Ormidale Place, Dingwall

Official intimation has now been received by Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Ormidale Place, Dingwall, from the Canadian Record Office, London, to the effect that their son, 17418 Private R. Macdonald, machine gun section, 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Canadian Contingent, British Expeditionary Force, reported missing on 24th April, 1915, is for official purposes presumed to have been killed on or since April 1915. This decision has been come to owing to the lapse of time and to the fact that no information has come to hand from any source indicating that he might be still alive.
Many Dingwallians at home and abroad will regret to know that, notwithstanding the efforts that have been made, no trace has been found of this missing hero, and the deepest sympathy is extended to the sorrowing parents who for almost a year now have hoped against hope. The last vestige of information is that on 24th April last he volunteered to his officer to go down the lines for ammunition. That he performed the task was evidenced by the fact that the message was delivered in the proper quarter, and the ammunition arrived in due course. Roderick, however, was never seen again. There was a particularly heavy bombardment of the line that night, and it is feared that he must have lost his way and got into a German trench or that he was struck by a shell.

The deceased would have been 24 years of age last August had he lived. A well set-up youth with a bright and happy disposition, he was a great favourite with his comrades. He took part in almost all realms of sport, but football was most to his liking, and he was always to be found in the season chasing the leather. He was a draper to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr Hector Crawford, draper. Three or four years ago he left Dingwall for Glasgow, where he was engaged in a large wholesale and retail warehouse. Subsequently he emigrated to Canada, and in British Columbia he was just finding his feet when war broke out.

He was not in time to get into the 1st Canadian Contingent, and at his own expense he crossed to the home country. There he heard there were vacancies in the Canadian Contingent, which had landed by this time. He immediately enlisted, and received his training in the south of England. The Canadians went to France early in 1915, and from the first were in the thick of the fighting. They were about the first men to suffer from the German gas attacks. One of the bravest of the brave, Roderick never spared himself, and he died nobly on the field of battle.

Photo: #5989

Macdonald Roderick, 2 Lieut, Dingwall

Second Lieutenant Roderick Macdonald

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Bogchro House, Dingwall

THE LATE 2/LT. RODK. MACDONALD, SEAFORTHS

The death from wounds of 2/Lieut. Roderick Macdonald, Seaforths, briefly reported last week, will be widely regretted by his brother officers and by many Seaforths of the county regiment. Deceased is the son of Mr and Mrs Roderick Macdonald, Bogchro House, Dingwall. Before the war he was in the employment of Messrs C. & J. Urquhart, Dingwall. Educated at Ullapool Higher Grade School, he joined the Territorials as a private five years ago on his school work ending. Mobilising in August, 1914, he trained with the battalion at Bedford, and was with the battalion when it marched out of John Bunyan town (the first regiment to move off) in the memorable days of November 1914. Since then he has been on active service, and as a Sergeant of C Company, from Neuve Chapelle onwards, had been identified with all the serious work which the fortunes of war has thrown upon his regiment. C. Company suffered heavily at Neuve Chapelle; young Macdonald then and for long afterwards was immune from casualty. Towards the autumn of last year he was sent to a Cadet School in France, and when he later on, in October 1916, received his commission, he was posted to his old unit.

Lt. Macdonald was seriously wounded in the knee on the 9th April. He was treated in a French hospital. His mother undertook the long and perilous journey with maternal avidity so soon as she learned that his one desire was that she should be near him. She arrived, happily, before the end. Two operations to save the injured limb were unavailing, and amputation became imperative, but his strength failed and he passed away. The mother speaks in terms of unfeigned gratitude for the splendid attention of the hospital staff and equally gratefully of the kindness she experienced both in France and on the journey. Remaining till the last, she saw her bright and gallant son buried honourably in a soldier’s grave on soil sacred to many British parents. Captain Dewar was at the funeral.

A brother officer (since killed) referred to him as “a fine, modest, true man”. 2/Lt. Macdonald’s portrait is reproduced above.

Photograph of the mother of Second Lieutenant Roderick Macdonald who made the arduous journey from Dingwall to France, to be with her son in his final days.

Macdonald Roderick, Mother of Lieut, Dingwall

Photo: #6022

Macdonald William, L Corp, Dingwall

Lance Corporal William Macdonald

Date of Paper: 10.3.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: St James Street, Dingwall

Macdonald, Lance Corporal W., 1974, B (Dingwall) Coy., wounded 11th March, 1915, died of wounds same day; aged 20 years; second son of ex-Baillie Wm. Macdonald, carpenter contractor, and Mrs Macdonald, St James Street, Dingwall. Engineer in Rose Street Foundry, Inverness. Well known footballer, and prominent member of Victoria United Football Club, Dingwall.