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Photo: #6560

Mackay Frederick, Pte, Tain

Private Fred Mackay

Date of Paper: 31.05.1918
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): Fred
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Manse Street, Tain.

No Headline

It is with deep regret that the news was received of the death of Pte. Fred Mackay, Seaforths, youngest son of Mr Donald Mackay, Manse Street, Tain. Being of a very cheery disposition and highly respected by all who knew him, his death was sadly lamented by all. He joined up on 20th February, 1917, and was posted to the 3rd Seaforths. He went to France on the 31st March, 1918 and was drafted into a Service Battalion of Seaforths. He was only 3 weeks and one day in France when he was very severely wounded by gunshot in the arm and back, and died a few hours after being taken into the Clearing Station. He was buried in the Cemetry close to the Clearing Station. Previous to joining up Pte. Mackay served his time with Messrs Gallie & Co., grocers, Market Street, Tain.

Three brothers are still serving, one Sergt. Duncan Mackay, Seaforths, is in Palestine;
Pte. Donald Mackay, R.A.M.C. is in Liverpool, and Mr Henry Mackay, is a Surgeon Probationer in the Navy.

The fourth brother served for 16 months in France. He was discharged and is now on Government work.

A photograph of deceased, who was a fine soldier and a splendid young fellow, appears to-day.

Photo: #6568

Mackay John, Pte, Tain

Private John Mackay

Date of Paper: 24.04.1917
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Shandwick Place, Tain

THE LATE PTE. J. MACKAY, TAIN

The late Pte. John Mackay, Seaforths, whom we reported in our last issue as being killed in action on April 6th, and whose photograph we reproduce to-day, was the elder son of Mrs Mackay, Shandwick Place, Tain. In his 23rd year, he enlisted just a year ago, and after training, proceeded to France in August last. Along with two companions he was killed by shell. Prior to the war, he was employed by Mr Duncan Matheson, grocer, Tain.

His mother, a brother, and seven sisters mourn the loss of a most dutiful son.

Photo: #6580

Mackenzie David, Sgt Major, Tain

Sergeant Major David Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 13.12.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): David
Rank: Sergeant Major
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Hartmount, Tain

DISTINGUISHED TAIN CANADIAN'S DEATH

Official information has been received of the death in France of Sergt.-Major David Mackenzie, Canadians. Sergt.-Major Mackenzie emigrated to Canada eight years ago. When war broke out he joined the Canadian Mounted Rifles. After a few months training in England he proceeded to France, taking part in the hard fighting of the last three years. He was soon recognised by his officers and was offered a commission on the field, but deceased was in no hurry for promotion. Within the last few months his progress had been rapid, and he was awarded the Military Medal in the attack at Le Quesnoy, and the D.C.M. in the taking of Cambrai. On the eve of leaving for England to take up a commission he was struck by a shell, and died soon afterwards.

Sergt.-Major Mackenzie was the youngest son of the late William Mackenzie and Mrs Mackenzie, Hartmount, Tain. He leaves two sisters and two brothers, who mourn his loss. A photo appears today.

Photo: #6577

Mackenzie Donald, Sgt, Tain

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 18.02.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: 8, Dunrobin Street, Tain.

No Headline

Sergeant Donald Mackenzie, A (Tain) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, whose portrait appears above, is a son of Mrs Mackenzie, 8 Dunrobin Street, Tain. He went to France with his battalion in November 1914, and, with the exception of a few days leave at the end of last year, has been with the battalion through all its experiences. Although only 21 years of age, his promotion, while rapid, was thoroughly well deserved. Previous to the war he was a gardener with Mr Holmes, Tain.

Photo: #6543

Mackenzie George R, Corp, Australia Ex Tain

Corporal George R. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 23.03.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): George R.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Australian Contingent
Home Address: 5, Academy Street, Tain

No Headline

Corpl. George R. Mackenzie, only son of the late Angus Mackenzie, 5 Academy Street, Tain, came over from Queensland, and while in training in England was chosen as one of the Australian Contingent in the overseas contingent which was in the procession the day His Majesty opened Parliament. Cpl. G. R. Mackenzie is now in France.

Photo: #6567

Mackenzie John G, Pte, Tain

Private John G. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 13.09.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): John G
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 6, Chapel Road, Tain

TAIN SEAFORTH KILLED IN ACTION

As recently reported, 25833 Pte. John G. Mackenzie, Seaforths, whose photo. is reproduced today, was killed in action on the Western Front on July 29. The son of Mr Mackenzie, railway guard, and Mrs Mackenzie, 6 Chapel Road, Tain, he was 19 years of age. Called to the colours in 1917, he was trained with the Cameron graduate battalion and transferred before going to France in January 1918 to a Seaforth Service battalion. He served in France with the Seaforths, and was a battalion runner. He shared in the heavy fighting during the spring offensive of the Germans, and fell in the stiff fighting on July 29th, when the Allies were at the height of their offensive operations when a famous kilted Highland Division did splendid work at Buzancy, reference to which will be found in an article in today’s paper. Capt. J. Macmillan, a brave and intrepid Stornoway officer, who distinguished himself in action, writing to the parents says: “It is little comfort that I can offer you in your irreparable loss – your son was a good and cheerful soldier, and we all, in A Coy., deplore his loss. We sympathise with you all at home and pray that the Lord may comfort you.” Lieut. Edward Hope Hawthorne writes: “I can’t tell you how sorry I am to have to write you such sad news. John was killed on the 29th July by the same shell that killed our Colonel. It will be some small consolation to you, perhaps, to know that John suffered no pain. We were able to bury him decently near where he fell, and perhaps some day after the war you may, if you care, visit his grave. John had done great work with us as a runner and, had he lived, would doubtless have received a decoration; but, apart from that, he was well liked, and we all miss him very much – myself as much as his other comrades.”

Before joining up Pte. Mackenzie was employed as a butcher with Mr R. Anderson, Burghead, having learned the business with Mr A. Munro, Tain.

With the parents and a sister who survive the deepest sympathy is felt, and they express their sincere gratitude for many kindly expressions of consolation which have reached them.

Photo: #6572

Mackenzie William J, Pte, Tain

Private William John Fraser

Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): William John
Rank: Private
Regiment: South African Infantry
Home Address: Gower Place, Tain

No Headline

Private William John Fraser joined D Company 4th Regiment of the South African Infantry, aka the South African Scottish. It was raised from members of the Transvaal Scottish and the Cape Town Highlanders who wore the Atholl Murray tartan.

The South Africans were heavily engaged during the battle of the Somme fighting for Delville Wood in August 1916 Of the 3000 men who went into action with the South African Brigade only 768 emerged unscathed. William was taken prisoner having suffered a gunshot wound to the knee. He died from disease in a German POW Camp on 19 October 1916, aged 20, and is buried in Le Cateau Military Cemetery in France.

William’s name has come to the attention of Captain Andre van Ellingham as it is carved on the war memorial in his hometown of Vryheid in Natal Province, South Africa.

Captain van Ellingham is researching all of the names on the memorial, which includes other conflicts. He has obtained some information about William but would like to know his connection to Vryheid. He can be contacted by email at vanEllinckhuyzenAndre@sapa.gov.za

Photo: #6551

Maclean Malcolm, L Corp, Tain

Lance Corporal Malcolm Maclean

Date of Paper: 19.04.1918
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): Malcolm
Rank: Lance-Corporal
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: 10 Lamington Street, Tain

No Headline

As recently reported official news has been received at 10 Lamington Street, Tain, that Lce.-Cpl. Malcolm Maclean, Royal Scots, has died of severe wounds in the 18th General Hospital, France. Lce.-Cpl. Maclean mobilised at the outbreak of war, and had a long spell of active service. Taking part in the Gallipoli campaign, where he got badly wounded in the head after six months treatment in hospital he rejoined his regiment, and was sent to France. There he saw much fighting. A bad attack of dysentery sent him home, but he made a good recovery. He paid a visit to Tain a year ago to see his people. Since then he had been in France and was slightly wounded L./C. Maclean is the youngest some of Mr and Mrs Geo. Maclean, late of Dalmore, Ardross, where the gallant soldier made many friends. Much sympathy is felt with the father and mother and the sisters, who reside at 10 Lamington Street, Tain.

A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #6546

Macleod William, Corp, Tain

Corporal William Macleod

Date of Paper: 25.05.1917 and 02.11.1917
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ross St., Tain

TAIN MAN GETS MILITARY MEDAL

Corpl. William Macleod, Seaforths, Tain, whose photograph is reproduced, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry on the field on 9th April. Corporal Macleod has been in France for nearly 3 years and has taken part in several important battles. He has been fortunate enough to escape unscathed. Cpl. Macleod has only been home on four days’ leave since joining the British Expeditionary Force, but hopes to get leave soon. He had many friends in Tain, and they will be all glad to hear of this honour conferred on him.

Photo: #6578

Macrae George W, Sgt, Tain

Sergeant George W. Macrae

Paper: 19.11.1915
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): George W.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 8, Knockbreck Street, Tain

No Headline

The honour of being the first of the rank and file of the 1/4th Seaforths to be mentioned in dispatches fell to Sergeant George W. Macrae, Tain Company, and a native of the Royal Burgh of Tain, whose portrait we reproduce above. Sergeant Macrae is a son of Quartermaster-Sergt. James Macrae, 4th Seaforths, attached to the 1st Scottish Provisional Battalion, who is better known as a plumber contractor in Tain, and Mrs Macrae, 8 Knockbreck Street, Tain, and a grandson of Mr George Smith, Aberdeen, a former tenant of Kinkell Castle, Conon Bridge. This young hero, who is only 19 years of age, has already been twice wounded, but has been able to continue on duty. Previous to the war he was an assistant chemist with Mr J. P. Macleod, Tain, Ross-shire. The men of the 1/4ths, and the people of Tain in particular, are proud of their hero.

At the present moment Sergt. Macrae is in hospital suffering from bronchitis, but is getting on well.

Photo: #6549

Matheson George, Gunner, Tain

Gunner George Matheson

Date of Paper: 31.05.1918
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): George
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Seaforths / R.G.A.
Home Address: Tain

FORMER TAIN SEAFORTH KILLED

A photograph appears today of Gunner George Matheson, recently reported killed in action, mobilised with the Tain Company of Seaforths, and afterwards transferred to the R.G.A. Deceased was 20 years of age, and before the war worked with his father in Tain. Gunner Matheson was a brave and courageous young soldier. He won the Military Medal for gallantry in action, an honour rarely given and reserved for exceptional services. In Tain he was held in high esteem and sympathy goes out to his relatives in their bereavement.

Photo: #6557

Morrison Donald, Pte, Tain

Private Donald Morrison

Date of Paper: 19.11.1915
Surname: Morrison
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Ross Street, Tain

No Headline

3845 Private Donald Morrison,1/4th Seaforths, wounded on 24th October, died of his wounds on the same day. On the 24th, Col. Cuthbert, D.S.O., commanding the regiment, wrote to Private Morrison’s mother, who resides at Ross Street, Tain, intimating that her son had been dangerously wounded, having been shot through the head. On the 27th Colonel Cuthbert sent the sad news that Pte. Morrison had died of his wounds. “It may be some small comfort to you to know,” he wrote, “that he did not suffer, and that his end was peace. In him the battalion has lost a splendid soldier, and one who always did his best, and who appreciated very thoroughly what his duty was, and always did it faithfully and well. May I offer you my deepest and heartfelt sympathy in your loss.”
Rev. John Macleod, chaplain to the 1/4th Seaforths, in a letter to Mrs Morrison, states that Private Morrison was buried in the new military cemetery of Vielle Chapelle, where so many of his comrades are lying. He adds: “I officiated at the funeral, and Colonel Cuthbert was also present. Your son did his duty right well, and the consciousness that he served his country so well in the hour of its destiny should be an encouragement to you in your sorrow. You have the sincere sympathy of all who knew your boy.”

Private Morrison had a very short military career. He joined the battalion in June last and after three months training at Fort George was sent out with the last draft, and he had only been in France six weeks when his young life – he was a month less than [obliterated] years – was cut short. Educated at Nigg Public School, he was a butcher to trade, and previous to enlisting was employed by Mr Johnstone, Balintore Farm. He was well known in Nigg, Balintore, Tain, and Alness, and his death is mourned by many. The deepest sympathy is extended to his widowed mother.

An elder brother of the deceased, Private Evan Morrison, is also with the 4th Seaforths. He went out with the 1/4th to France, and went through all the engagements in which his regiment took part. Recently he was invalided home, and after being at Fort George is now with the 3/4th Seaforths in England.

[Handwritten note re Evan: “Nov. 1918 D.C.M. – Sergt. Already the M.M.”]

See entry below for details of his brother Evan Morrison

Photo: #6558

Morrison Evan, Pte, Tain

Private Evan Morrison

Date of Paper: 19.11.1915
Surname: Morrison
First Name(s): Evan
Rank: Private
Regiment: 3/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Ross Street, Tain

No Headline

3845 Private Donald Morrison,1/4th Seaforths, wounded on 24th October, died of his wounds on the same day. On the 24th, Col. Cuthbert, D.S.O., commanding the regiment, wrote to Private Morrison’s mother, who resides at Ross Street, Tain, intimating that her son had been dangerously wounded, having been shot through the head. On the 27th Colonel Cuthbert sent the sad news that Pte. Morrison had died of his wounds. “It may be some small comfort to you to know,” he wrote, “that he did not suffer, and that his end was peace. In him the battalion has lost a splendid soldier, and one who always did his best, and who appreciated very thoroughly what his duty was, and always did it faithfully and well. May I offer you my deepest and heartfelt sympathy in your loss.”
Rev. John Macleod, chaplain to the 1/4th Seaforths, in a letter to Mrs Morrison, states that Private Morrison was buried in the new military cemetery of Vielle Chapelle, where so many of his comrades are lying. He adds: “I officiated at the funeral, and Colonel Cuthbert was also present. Your son did his duty right well, and the consciousness that he served his country so well in the hour of its destiny should be an encouragement to you in your sorrow. You have the sincere sympathy of all who knew your boy.”

Private Morrison had a very short military career. He joined the battalion in June last and after three months training at Fort George was sent out with the last draft, and he had only been in France six weeks when his young life – he was a month less than [obliterated] years – was cut short. Educated at Nigg Public School, he was a butcher to trade, and previous to enlisting was employed by Mr Johnstone, Balintore Farm. He was well known in Nigg, Balintore, Tain, and Alness, and his death is mourned by many. The deepest sympathy is extended to his widowed mother.

An elder brother of the deceased, Private Evan Morrison, is also with the 4th Seaforths. He went out with the 1/4th to France, and went through all the engagements in which his regiment took part. Recently he was invalided home, and after being at Fort George is now with the 3/4th Seaforths in England.

[Handwritten note re Evan: “Nov. 1918 D.C.M. – Sergt. Already the M.M.”]

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Morrison