Tain WW I page 1

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Photo: #6571

Bruce William, Pte, Vancouver Ex Tain

Private William Bruce

Date of Paper: 19.04.1918
Surname: Bruce
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Moss Road, Tain

No Headline

According to the casualty list (says a Canadian contemporary) another of the few remaining members of the brave little band of Seaforth Highlanders who left Vancouver in August, 1914, has given up his life for his country in France. This time it is the name of Pte. Wm. Bruce which appeared as having died in France on February 6th. Pte. Wm. Bruce, who was of Scottish descent, enlisted shortly after war broke out, and left Vancouver with the first draft from the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders. With the exception of a year spent in England while convalescing from severe wounds, he had been in France continuously since the first contingent crossed.

Pte. Bruce fought with his regiment in all the famous battles in which the Canadian Scottish took part, while he was shot through at Hill 60 in May, 1916. Instead of accepting his discharge he preferred to return to France, and was sent back with the Forestry Corps. In November, 1917, he met with an accident as a result of a collision between a train and a forestry motor lorry, and was in hospital in France for several weeks. He partially recovered, and was back at duty when his last letter was received. Being anxious to be back in camp, it is thought that Pte. Bruce left the hospital too soon, and, being in a weakened condition, as result of his severe wounds and strenuous experiences, succumbed to illness. Pte. Bruce leaves one sister in Vancouver, Mrs. J. R. Mackenzie, and one Mrs Boyd, who is at present working in an airplane factory in Glasgow, her husband, Capt. A. M. Boyd, also being in France.

His eldest brother, Donald, gave up his life in the South African War:

Another brother, Sergeant Robt. Bruce, is still on active service, although he also was severely wounded. His third brother, Hugh was invalided home to Vancouver with complications and shell shock. Like other men of the 1st Contingent, Pte. Bruce has fought faithfully for his country for nearly three years without a murmur or complaint, and, in reply to a question asked him by his sister in one of her letters as to why he did not accept promotions offered to him, he replied that he preferred ìto do his bit for his country as a plain The late Pte. Bruce was the youngest son of the late Mr Robt. Bruce, Moss Road, Tain, and he was well known in the Royal Burgh seventeen years ago. Many Tain people will regret the death of such a gallant, plucky soldier, the story of whose endurance and determination to “stick it” as told by a Canadian contemporary, deserves preservation in Ross-shire’s records of the Great War.

Photo: #6553

Cameron Ian D, Lieut, Tain

Second Lieutenant Ian Douglas Cameron

Date of Paper: 27.08.1915
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Ian Douglas
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: 2nd Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Tain

IN MEMORIAM

The late Second Lieutenant Ian Douglas Cameron, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, died from wounds received at St Julien on 25th April, 1915, aged 21 years, son of the Rev. Angus Cameron, Episcopal Church, Tain, and Mrs Cameron.

Photo: #6548

Carlin James H, CSM, Tain

Sergeant James Hunter Carlin

Date of Paper: 28.12.1917
Surname: Carlin
First Name(s): James Hunter
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Broomhill, Fendom, Tain

TAIN MILITARY MEDALLIST

Sergt. James H. Carlin, Cameron Highlanders, son-in-law of Mr and Mrs John Munro, Broomhill, Fendom, Tain, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery. Sergt. Carlin went out to France in January, 1916. He was wounded in March, 1917, and was sent to this country. He returned to France in August, 1917, and won the above honour on 12th October. A photograph appears to-day.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Mrs Carlin, daughter of Mr and Mrs Munro, Broomhill, Fendom, Tain, has received a post card from her husband, Act. Coy. Sergt-Major J. H. Carlin, M.M., Camerons, reported missing since 25th April, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and well. Act. C.S.M. Carlin joined up soon after the outbreak of war, and had been in France since 1915. There he saw much of the heavy fighting in which the Camerons have borne their full share. Wounded in March, 1917, he was sent to England, and latterly to Invergordon, and returned to France in August. News of his safety has brought much relief to his relatives. A photo appears to-day.

Date of Paper: Undated

Coy.-Sergt.-Major James Hunter Carlin, M.M., 5th Camerons, is a son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Munro, and his wife and child reside at Broomhill. C.S.M. Carlin enlisted on the 5th August, 1914, and saw much fighting in the early days of the war. In March, 1917, he was wounded and sent to England. He was latterly at Invergordon and returned to France in August, 1917. In October of the same year he was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery On 25th April, 1918, he was reported missing but subsequently news came from him he was a prisoner of war. He has now been repatriated.

His elder brother, Pte Robert Carlin, 10th Gordons, was reported missing at the Battle of Loos and is now presumed to have been killed. C.S.M. Carlin is 22 years of age and is a steel worker to trade.

See entry below for details of his brother Robert Carlin

No photo available

Private Robert Carlin

Date of Paper: 28.12.1917
Surname: Carlin
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Private
Regiment: 10th Gordons
Home Address: Broomhill, Fendom, Tain

TAIN MILITARY MEDALLIST

Sergt. James H. Carlin, Cameron Highlanders, son-in-law of Mr and Mrs John Munro, Broomhill, Fendom, Tain, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery. Sergt. Carlin went out to France in January, 1916. He was wounded in March, 1917, and was sent to this country. He returned to France in August, 1917, and won the above honour on 12th October. A photograph appears to-day.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Mrs Carlin, daughter of Mr and Mrs Munro, Broomhill, Fendom, Tain, has received a post card from her husband, Act. Coy. Sergt-Major J. H. Carlin, M.M., Camerons, reported missing since 25th April, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and well. Act. C.S.M. Carlin joined up soon after the outbreak of war, and had been in France since 1915. There he saw much of the heavy fighting in which the Camerons have borne their full share. Wounded in March, 1917, he was sent to England, and latterly to Invergordon, and returned to France in August. News of his safety has brought much relief to his relatives. A photo appears to-day.

Date of Paper: Undated

Coy.-Sergt.-Major James Hunter Carlin, M.M., 5th Camerons, is a son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Munro, and his wife and child reside at Broomhill. C.S.M. Carlin enlisted on the 5th August, 1914, and saw much fighting in the early days of the war. In March, 1917, he was wounded and sent to England. He was latterly at Invergordon and returned to France in August, 1917. In October of the same year he was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery On 25th April, 1918, he was reported missing but subsequently news came from him he was a prisoner of war. He has now been repatriated.

His elder brother, Pte Robert Carlin, 10th Gordons, was reported missing at the Battle of Loos and is now presumed to have been killed. C.S.M. Carlin is 22 years of age and is a steel worker to trade.

See entry above for details of his brother James Carlin

Photo: #6562

Dyce James, Pte, Tain

Private James Dyce

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Dyce
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 9, Petley Street, Tain.

TAIN SEAFORTH KILLED

Pte. James Dyce, 4093, Seaforths, was killed in action on 14th November, 1916. Deceased, whose wife resides at 9 Petley Street, Tain, went to France about nine months ago, and recently he was slightly wounded.

In a letter to Mrs Dyce, the Rev. J. Macleod, chaplain, writes: “He was a real soldier, and his officers and comrades speak well of him. I hope it will do you good to think he died for his country in the hour of need. Your sorrow is the sorrow of many, and I pray that God may give you strength and blessing you all need.”

Sincere sympathy is felt for Mrs Dyce, his widow, and for his parents, Mr and Mrs Charles Dyce, who reside at Mill’s Buildings, Inverness.

Photo: #6556

Fridge Angus, Pte, Tain

Private Angus Fridge

Date of Paper: 01.09.1916
Surname: Fridge
First Name(s): Angus
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 18, Stafford Street, Tain.

THE LATE CORPORAL W. FRIDGE

Above we reproduce the photographs of Corporal W. Fridge and Private Angus Fridge, Seaforths, sons of Mr and Mrs Fridge, 18 Stafford Street, Tain. Corporal Fridge, as was reported in a recent issue, gave up his life for his country on 23rd July, when he died of his wounds received in the “big push”. He was only 20 years of age and was a painter to trade. He went out with the battalion in November 1914, along with his brother, Private Angus Fridge. Willie never received a scratch until the month of July 1916, while Angus has been three times wounded, but is still in the trenches. Angus is 22 years of age.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Corporal Angus Fridge, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Fridge, 18 Stafford Street, Tain, has been reported killed in action. His brother, Corporal William Fridge, Seaforths, was killed in action on 23rd July 1916. The two brothers went to France together with the country Battalion on 4th November 1914. Angus, who was 23 years of age, was the elder brother and had been three times wounded; his brother escaped without a scratch until he was killed. They were two fine soldiers; “two of the noblest boys that ever joined the regiment,” writes an officer in a touching letter to the parents. Angus was a great favourite in the battalion, and his experiences gained for him the distinction which always attaches to the young veterans who have been “through it all”. His death is a great loss; reducing still further the noble circle which remained of those men whose 1914 Star was waiting them, and which in his case as in others will now fall to the parents as a sad but glorious memento of the sacrifice which their sons made, and from which in their lasting bereavement they now suffer.

In the letter referred to, Lieut Campbell writes: “It is with feeling of deep sorrow I write of the death of your son Angus. In him I have lost one of the finest and most capable of NCO’s in the section. ‘Angie’ was the most popular man in the section, and his cheerfulness, his eagerness to volunteer for a task, however dangerous, and, above all, his fine sense of duty endeared him to all. In extending to you my heartfelt sympathy, I speak on behalf of every man in my section, who mourn the death of a fearless and true comrade. For Angus I had the greatest admiration, as also I had for your dear son Willie who fell last year – two of the noblest boys who ever joined the ranks of the regiment they loved and honoured.”

See entry below for details of his brother William Fridge

Photo: #6545

Fridge William, Corp, Tain

Corporal William Fridge

Date of Paper: 01.09.1916
Surname: Fridge
First Name(s): William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 18 Stafford Street, Tain

THE LATE CORPORAL W. FRIDGE

Above we reproduce the photographs of Corporal W. Fridge and Private Angus Fridge, Seaforths, sons of Mr and Mrs Fridge, 18 Stafford Street, Tain. Corporal Fridge, as was reported in a recent issue, gave up his life for his country on 23rd July, when he died of his wounds received in the “big push”. He was only 20 years of age and was a painter to trade. He went out with the battalion in November 1914, along with his brother, Private Angus Fridge. Willie never received a scratch until the month of July 1916, while Angus has been three times wounded, but is still in the trenches. Angus is 22 years of age.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Corporal Angus Fridge, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Fridge, 18 Stafford Street, Tain, has been reported killed in action. His brother, Corporal William Fridge, Seaforths, was killed in action on 23rd July 1916. The two brothers went to France together with the country Battalion on 4th November 1914. Angus, who was 23 years of age, was the elder brother and had been three times wounded; his brother escaped without a scratch until he was killed. They were two fine soldiers; “two of the noblest boys that ever joined the regiment,” writes an officer in a touching letter to the parents. Angus was a great favourite in the battalion, and his experiences gained for him the distinction which always attaches to the young veterans who have been “through it all”. His death is a great loss; reducing still further the noble circle which remained of those men whose 1914 Star was waiting them, and which in his case as in others will now fall to the parents as a sad but glorious memento of the sacrifice which their sons made, and from which in their lasting bereavement they now suffer.

In the letter referred to, Lieut Campbell writes: “It is with feeling of deep sorrow I write of the death of your son Angus. In him I have lost one of the finest and most capable of NCO’s in the section. ‘Angie’ was the most popular man in the section, and his cheerfulness, his eagerness to volunteer for a task, however dangerous, and, above all, his fine sense of duty endeared him to all. In extending to you my heartfelt sympathy, I speak on behalf of every man in my section, who mourn the death of a fearless and true comrade. For Angus I had the greatest admiration, as also I had for your dear son Willie who fell last year – two of the noblest boys who ever joined the ranks of the regiment they loved and honoured.”

See entry above for details of his brother Angus Fridge

Photo: #6574

Grant James, Rifleman, Tain

Rifleman James Grant

Date of Paper: 16.08.1918
Surname: Grant
First Name(s): James
Rank: Rifleman
Regiment: London Regiment
Home Address: Woodside, Highmills Road, Tain.

TAIN RIFLEMAN KILLED

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, by Mr and Mrs Grant, Woodside, Highmills Road, Tain, that their son, 3_2513 Rifleman James Grant, The London Regiment (Post Office Rifles), who was reported missing since 30th October last, is now presumed to have been killed or died of wounds received in action, on that date. Rifleman Grant, whose photo appears today, was in the Post Office service at Tain and Fearn, from which latter place he joined up, on attaining the age. After training in this country he went to France with his Battalion, and had seen considerable service on the Western Front. Although enquiry had been made through all the available channels, no information could be obtained as to Rifleman Grant’s fate, and great sympathy is extended to Mr and Mrs Grant, after 9 months of suspense, in the loss of their young and promising son. Letters received from the lad’s officers speak in the highest praise of his qualities as a soldier.

Rifleman Grant is a brother of Mrs Henderson, Constabulary Headquarters, Dingwall.

Photo: #6544

Gregor W, Corp, Tain

Corporal W. Gregor

Date of Paper: 15.02.1918
Surname: Gregor
First Name(s): W.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment:
Home Address: Balcherry Road, Fendom, Tain.

TAIN N.C.O. TO RECEIVE COMMISSION

There appears today a photograph of Corpl. W. Gregor, son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Munro, Balcherry Road, Fendom, Tain, who was wounded for the third time in November while acting as Q.M.S. Corpl. Gregor went to France in September 1914 and has been, in many encounters and many big battles. He was most popular with all ranks while serving with his unit. He was married to a daughter of Mr and Mrs Munro. Cpl. Gregor is meantime in an English hospital recovering from wounds. He is expected home soon, and thereafter enters the O.T.C. with a view to a commission.

Photo: #6555

Harper Alexander, Pte, Tain

Private Alexander Harper

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Harper
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address: 10 Murray Street, Tain

A TAIN FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

We reproduce today the portraits of a father and three sons, all of whom have served with the colours, and two of whom have made the supreme sacrifice. The father is Mr Donald Harper, 10 Murray Street, Tain, who himself is an old 72nd Seaforth, having served with the regiment for ten years.

3014 Pte. Alexander Harper, RAMC, died of wounds received in action on 15th November 1916, while serving in France. Deceased enlisted in the Camerons in 1900, and when war broke out he was a reservist and was called up. He went to France with the British Expeditionary Force and was through many battles, escaping scathless until he fell mortally wounded.

Corporal Donald Harper, KOSB, died in hospital in Aberdeen on 16th October 1915, from illness contracted while on service. He also was an old soldier, having been in the 2nd Seaforths for 12 years.

Private James Harper, 22797, Royal Scots, was discharged from the Army some months ago, suffering from shell shock. Like his brother, he was in the 2nd Seaforths, but after serving in India he was invalided home.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6542

Harper Donald, Corp, Tain

Corporal Donald Harper

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Harper
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: King’s Own Scottish Borderers
Home Address: 10, Murray Street, Tain

A TAIN FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

We reproduce today the portraits of a father and three sons, all of whom have served with the colours, and two of whom have made the supreme sacrifice. The father is Mr Donald Harper, 10 Murray Street, Tain, who himself is an old 72nd Seaforth, having served with the regiment for ten years.

3014 Pte. Alexander Harper, RAMC, died of wounds received in action on 15th November 1916, while serving in France. Deceased enlisted in the Camerons in 1900, and when war broke out he was a reservist and was called up. He went to France with the British Expeditionary Force and was through many battles, escaping scathless until he fell mortally wounded.

Corporal Donald Harper, KOSB, died in hospital in Aberdeen on 16th October 1915, from illness contracted while on service. He also was an old soldier, having been in the 2nd Seaforths for 12 years.

Private James Harper, 22797, Royal Scots, was discharged from the Army some months ago, suffering from shell shock. Like his brother, he was in the 2nd Seaforths, but after serving in India he was invalided home.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6563

Harper James, Pte, Tain

Private James Harper

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916
Surname: Harper
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Seaforths / Royal Scots
Home Address: 10, Murray Street, Tain

A TAIN FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

We reproduce today the portraits of a father and three sons, all of whom have served with the colours, and two of whom have made the supreme sacrifice. The father is Mr Donald Harper, 10 Murray Street, Tain, who himself is an old 72nd Seaforth, having served with the regiment for ten years.

3014 Pte. Alexander Harper, RAMC, died of wounds received in action on 15th November 1916, while serving in France. Deceased enlisted in the Camerons in 1900, and when war broke out he was a reservist and was called up. He went to France with the British Expeditionary Force and was through many battles, escaping scathless until he fell mortally wounded.

Corporal Donald Harper, KOSB, died in hospital in Aberdeen on 16th October 1915, from illness contracted while on service. He also was an old soldier, having been in the 2nd Seaforths for 12 years.

Private James Harper, 22797, Royal Scots, was discharged from the Army some months ago, suffering from shell shock. Like his brother, he was in the 2nd Seaforths, but after serving in India he was invalided home.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6576

Macdonald A, Sgt, Ex Tain

Sergeant A. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 08.11.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Australians
Home Address: Australia, ex Easter Ross

No Headline

A photo appears today of Sergeant A. Macdonald, D.C.M., Australians, who according to Australian papers to hand has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Sergeant Macdonald belongs to Easter Ross, which he left seven years ago for Australia. From boyhood until he emigrated he had been employed by Mr J. D. Laidlaw, Tain. “As a lad, “Mr Laidlaw says, “he was the gamest of the game, and could with ease do the work of three ordinary men.” He was well known in Easter Ross, and the many friends of his boyhood will rejoice in the distinction which he has attained. An Australian newspaper says: “Sergeant Macdonald is a native of Scotland, and at the time of his enlistment was an employee of Tooth & Co Limited, Sydney. He joined the Army Service Corps as a driver, and left with the First Division for Egypt. During the voyage he succeeded in winning in one day the welter- and middle-weight boxing championships of his troopship . Whilst in camp in the Egypt he defeated the champion boxer of the Egyptian forces and won the welter-weight championship of the camp.

Driver Macdonald participated in the the landing at Gallipoli, and went right through the campaign there. Subsequently he was transferred to France, and was mentioned on several occasions for conspicuous gallantry, in the meantime being promoted to sergeant. He is now one of the veterans of the A.I.F., being still at the front.

Photo: #6579

Macgillivray John, Sgt, Tain

Sergeant John Macgillivray

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Macgillivray
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: 12, Lamington Street, Tain

No Headline

Macgillivray, Sergt. John, 940, son of Mr John Macgillivray, 12 Lamington Street, Tain, was in the service of the Post Office, which he entered after leaving the school. First telegraphic messenger, he became established postman at Cullicudden, and subsequently transferred to Tain, performing his duties with great acceptability. A good cyclist, he was a distinguished football player. Served with the battalion from mobilisation till he fell.

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