Kiltearn WW I page 1

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Photo: #6139

Black James, Pte, Evanton

Private James Black

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917
Surname: Black
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Camden Street, Evanton

THE LATE PTE. JAMES BLACK, EVANTON

Pte. James Black, Seaforths, who was killed in action on the 9th April, belonged to Evanton, where his mother resides at Camden St. The following is a copy of a letter received by the mother from the company officer:

“It is with the greatest sorrow and regret that I write to tell you of the death of your son, James Black, who was killed in action on the 9th April. The lad had been my personal orderly for close on two years, ever since I joined the battalion in France, and the fact of his death has caused me the greatest sorrow. He was known to everybody in the battalion, and had won the respect of all his comrades. No mark was found on his body, and the only conclusion we can come to is that he was killed by shell concussion. By his death I have lost a personal friend, and his care and attention to me at all times will never be forgotten. Officers and men alike join with me in offering you their heartfelt sympathy.

Yours sincerely, J. R. Black, Capt.”

Pte. Black was about 20 years of age and was a gardener at Balconie Castle before joining the Army. Deceased was a general favourite at home and at the front, and there is much sympathy with his mother. A photograph appears in to-dayís paper.

Photo: #6121

Campbell Pedro, Corp, Evanton

Corporal Pedro Cameron

Date of Paper: 10.11.1915
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Pedro
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Caberfeidh, Evanton

No Headline

The above is a photograph of 1685 Corporal Pedro Cameron, G (Alness) Coy., who was killed in action at Aubers Ridge on 9th May. Deceased, who resided at Caberfeidh, Evanton, was a native of Valparaiso, Chile, and came to Britain some seven years ago, having been resident in Evanton for three years. A tailor to trade, he was in business with Mr F. Macgillivray, tailor, Evanton. Corporal Cameron was a cultured singer, possessing a voice of exceptional power and richness, and rendered most valuable service to the Established Church choir and local concerts. He was an enthusiastic member of the Black Rock Rovers Football Club. He was well-known in the village and surrounding district, where he was most popular, his kindly ways and happy disposition making him a great favourite. He endeared himself to all who knew him.

Photo: #6142

Campbell John, Pte, Evanton

Private John Campbell

Date of Paper: 03.05.1918
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths (Service Battalion)
Home Address: Novar Gardens, Evanton

No Headline

Pte. John Campbell, Seaforth Service Battalion, who was killed in action on April 2nd, 1918, was a son of Mr and Mrs Campbell, Novar Gardens, Evanton. He joined up in 1915, and had been three times home, once wounded and once with trench feet. Deceased was a fine, tall, well built soldier, was only 21 years of age, and was very popular with his comrades and a credit to his regiment. Deep sympathy is felt with the father and mother and four sisters in their sore bereavement. A photo appears to-day.

Photo: #6128

Cormack Alexander, Pte, Evanton

Private Alexander Cormack

Date of Paper: 15.03.1918
Surname: Cormack
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Argyll & Sutherlands / Seaforths
Home Address: Assynt Mains, Evanton

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Cormack had four sons serving, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice. Out of a family of 14, 9 survive and all of the boys of military age are with the colours. Photographs of the four sons are printed to-day. Mr Cormack belongs to Caithness but has been a ploughman in Ross-shire for 25 years.

Sergt. Wm. Cormack, (24), 1/4th Seaforths, eldest son, joined up at mobilisation in August, 1914, and went out with the battalion in November of the same year. Going out as a private he received promotion in the field and has served throughout with Tain company without having received a scratch, although in all the big battles. Time expired, last year he had a month’s leave at home. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Logan, Auchnacloich.

Pte. James Cormack (21), second son, was called up with the 1/4th Seaforths at mobilisation, but was unable to proceed to France being under medical treatment and subsequently was posted for service with a Provisional Battalion. He went to France in 1916 and joined the 1/4th Seaforths, subsequently being transferred to the Morayshires. He served with his unit at Delville Wood and also at Arras in April last year when he was killed in action. He was a fine set-up soldier and was mourned by all his comrades and friends. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mrs Murdoch, Dalnavie, Ardross.

Pte. Henry Cormack (20), 2nd Seaforths, joined in June, 1917, and went to France in September of that year taking part in the severe fighting at Passchendaele. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Taylor, Moultavie, Alness.

Pte. Alexander Cormack (18), Argyll & Sutherlands, joined the Seaforths when 16 years of age and was subsequently discharged being under age. He rejoined in July, 1917 and is training with his unit. He was a [obliterated] with Mr Bell, Contullich, Alness.

See entries below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6137

Cormack Henry, Pte, Evanton

Private Henry Cormack

Date of Paper: 15.03.1918
Surname: Cormack
First Name(s): Henry
Rank: Private
Regiment: 2nd Seaforths
Home Address: Assynt Mains, Evanton

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Cormack had four sons serving, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice. Out of a family of 14, 9 survive and all of the boys of military age are with the colours. Photographs of the four sons are printed to-day. Mr Cormack belongs to Caithness but has been a ploughman in Ross-shire for 25 years.

Sergt. Wm. Cormack, (24), 1/4th Seaforths, eldest son, joined up at mobilisation in August, 1914, and went out with the battalion in November of the same year. Going out as a private he received promotion in the field and has served throughout with Tain company without having received a scratch, although in all the big battles. Time expired, last year he had a month’s leave at home. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Logan, Auchnacloich.

Pte. James Cormack (21), second son, was called up with the 1/4th Seaforths at mobilisation, but was unable to proceed to France being under medical treatment and subsequently was posted for service with a Provisional Battalion. He went to France in 1916 and joined the 1/4th Seaforths, subsequently being transferred to the Morayshires. He served with his unit at Delville Wood and also at Arras in April last year when he was killed in action. He was a fine set-up soldier and was mourned by all his comrades and friends. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mrs Murdoch, Dalnavie, Ardross.

Pte. Henry Cormack (20), 2nd Seaforths, joined in June, 1917, and went to France in September of that year taking part in the severe fighting at Passchendaele. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Taylor, Moultavie, Alness.

Pte. Alexander Cormack (18), Argyll & Sutherlands, joined the Seaforths when 16 years of age and was subsequently discharged being under age. He rejoined in July, 1917 and is training with his unit. He was a [obliterated] with Mr Bell, Contullich, Alness.

See entry above and entries below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6140

Cormack James, Pte, Evanton

Private James Cormack

Date of Paper: 15.03.1918
Surname: Cormack
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Assynt Mains, Evanton

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Cormack had four sons serving, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice. Out of a family of 14, 9 survive and all of the boys of military age are with the colours. Photographs of the four sons are printed to-day. Mr Cormack belongs to Caithness but has been a ploughman in Ross-shire for 25 years.

Sergt. Wm. Cormack, (24), 1/4th Seaforths, eldest son, joined up at mobilisation in August, 1914, and went out with the battalion in November of the same year. Going out as a private he received promotion in the field and has served throughout with Tain company without having received a scratch, although in all the big battles. Time expired, last year he had a month’s leave at home. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Logan, Auchnacloich.

Pte. James Cormack (21), second son, was called up with the 1/4th Seaforths at mobilisation, but was unable to proceed to France being under medical treatment and subsequently was posted for service with a Provisional Battalion. He went to France in 1916 and joined the 1/4th Seaforths, subsequently being transferred to the Morayshires. He served with his unit at Delville Wood and also at Arras in April last year when he was killed in action. He was a fine set-up soldier and was mourned by all his comrades and friends. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mrs Murdoch, Dalnavie, Ardross.

Pte. Henry Cormack (20), 2nd Seaforths, joined in June, 1917, and went to France in September of that year taking part in the severe fighting at Passchendaele. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Taylor, Moultavie, Alness.

Pte. Alexander Cormack (18), Argyll & Sutherlands, joined the Seaforths when 16 years of age and was subsequently discharged being under age. He rejoined in July, 1917 and is training with his unit. He was a [obliterated] with Mr Bell, Contullich, Alness.

See entries above and entry below for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6154

Cormack William, Sgt, Evanton

Sergeant William Cormack

Date of Paper: 15.03.1918
Surname: Cormack
First Name(s): William
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Assynt Mains, Evanton

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Cormack had four sons serving, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice. Out of a family of 14, 9 survive and all of the boys of military age are with the colours. Photographs of the four sons are printed to-day. Mr Cormack belongs to Caithness but has been a ploughman in Ross-shire for 25 years.

Sergt. Wm. Cormack, (24), 1/4th Seaforths, eldest son, joined up at mobilisation in August, 1914, and went out with the battalion in November of the same year. Going out as a private he received promotion in the field and has served throughout with Tain company without having received a scratch, although in all the big battles. Time expired, last year he had a month’s leave at home. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Logan, Auchnacloich.

Pte. James Cormack (21), second son, was called up with the 1/4th Seaforths at mobilisation, but was unable to proceed to France being under medical treatment and subsequently was posted for service with a Provisional Battalion. He went to France in 1916 and joined the 1/4th Seaforths, subsequently being transferred to the Morayshires. He served with his unit at Delville Wood and also at Arras in April last year when he was killed in action. He was a fine set-up soldier and was mourned by all his comrades and friends. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mrs Murdoch, Dalnavie, Ardross.

Pte. Henry Cormack (20), 2nd Seaforths, joined in June, 1917, and went to France in September of that year taking part in the severe fighting at Passchendaele. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Taylor, Moultavie, Alness.

Pte. Alexander Cormack (18), Argyll & Sutherlands, joined the Seaforths when 16 years of age and was subsequently discharged being under age. He rejoined in July, 1917 and is training with his unit. He was a [obliterated] with Mr Bell, Contullich, Alness.

See entries above for details of his three brothers

Photo: #6145

Douglas K, Pte, NZ Ex Evanton

Private K. Douglas

Date of Paper: 27.12.1918
Surname: Douglas
First Name(s): K.
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealand Rifle Brigade
Home Address: Swordale, Evanton

EVANTON SOLDIER DIES ON ARMISTICE DAY

Wounded on the 9th November, Pte. K. Douglas, New Zealand Rifle Brigade, died, as already reported, two days later on Armistice Day. Deceased, whose photo appears to-day, was the youngest son of Mr Ken. Douglas, Swordale, Evanton, and was well-known in the district where he spent his boyhood. He went to New Zealand eight years ago. He was North on leave just three weeks before he fell.

His brother, Andrew Douglas, made the supreme sacrifice about two years ago. The death occurring in the hour of victory and at the dawn of peace comes as a heavy blow to the aged father, with whom and with his brothers and sisters, who mourn his loss, much sympathy is felt.

Photo: #6124

Edmonstone Ben, L Corp, Canada Ex Evanton

Lance Corporal Ben Edmonstone

Date of Paper: 27.04.1917
Surname: Edmonstone
First Name(s): Ben
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Canadian Scottish
Home Address: Novar, Evanton

NOVAR CANADIAN KILLED

Lance-Corporal Ben Edmonstone, Canadian Scottish, reported missing on or about 8th October, 1916, has now been reported killed. Deceased was a son of the late Mr Edmonstone, head gardener, Novar, and of Mrs Edmonstone, 69 Land Street, Keith. He left Novar about 9 years ago for Canada, and was latterly working with the Granby Bay Mining Company in Alaska. Shortly after the outbreak of war he bravely responded to his country’s call, and came across with the 2nd Canadian Contingent to fight for the Motherland. He left England for France on the 1st March, 1915. Of a cheerful and kindly disposition, he was well liked, and was very popular with both the officers and men of his coy.

Much sympathy is extended to Mrs Edmonstone and family in their sad bereavement.

A portrait of Lance-Corpl. Edmonstone appears above.

Photo: #6143

Fraser John, Pte, Evanton

Private John Fraser

Date of Paper: 01.11.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Australians
Home Address: Australia (formerly Knockancurin, Evanton)

No Headline

As briefly stated in a recent issue Cpl. Wm. Fraser, M.S.M., M.M., Australians, was killed in action on the 18th Sept., 1918. When war broke out, Corpl. Fraser and his brother, Pte. John Fraser, were in Australia in responsible positions.

The war was only a few months in progress when they joined up. After training in Australia and Egypt they eventually arrived in France, where they took part in much severe fighting. Corpl. Fraser was wounded last year, and was sent to Blighty to recuperate. He afterwards rejoined his battalion and during the severe German offensive in April last was again wounded slightly. However, after a short stay at a base hospital, he was able to rejoin his comrades and to take part in some of the fiercest engagements of the war.

He was awarded the M.S.M., and later the M.M. for gallantry on the field, but, alas, he did not long enjoy his well-won decorations and he fell in action as already stated. A bright promising, fearless soldier, his kindly disposition endeared him to many, and his loss is mourned to-day by a wide circle of friends. He was 25 years of age. Pte. John Fraser was gassed in the May offensive, and is at present undergoing hospital treatment. Photographs of the gallant lads appear today.

They are the two eldest sons of Mr and Mrs Jas. Fraser, Knockancurin, Evanton.

See entry below for details of his brother William Fraser

Photo: #6122

Fraser William, Corp, Australia Ex Evanton

Corporal William Fraser

Date of Paper: 01.11.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s) William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Australians
Home Address: Australia (formerly Knockancurin, Evanton)

No Headline

As briefly stated in a recent issue Cpl. Wm. Fraser, M.S.M., M.M., Australians, was killed in action on the 18th Sept., 1918. When war broke out, Corpl. Fraser and his brother, Pte. John Fraser, were in Australia in responsible positions.

The war was only a few months in progress when they joined up. After training in Australia and Egypt they eventually arrived in France, where they took part in much severe fighting. Corpl. Fraser was wounded last year, and was sent to Blighty to recuperate. He afterwards rejoined his battalion and during the severe German offensive in April last was again wounded slightly. However, after a short stay at a base hospital, he was able to rejoin his comrades and to take part in some of the fiercest engagements of the war.

He was awarded the M.S.M., and later the M.M. for gallantry on the field, but, alas, he did not long enjoy his well-won decorations and he fell in action as already stated. A bright promising, fearless soldier, his kindly disposition endeared him to many, and his loss is mourned to-day by a wide circle of friends. He was 25 years of age. Pte. John Fraser was gassed in the May offensive, and is at present undergoing hospital treatment. Photographs of the gallant lads appear today.

They are the two eldest sons of Mr and Mrs Jas. Fraser, Knockancurin, Evanton.

See entry above for details of his brother John Fraser

Photo: #6148

Fraser Leslie, Pte, Evanton

Private Leslie Fraser

Date of Paper: 29.09.1916
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Leslie
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Foulis, Evanton

No Headline

Private Leslie Fraser, Seaforths, who was severely wounded in the arm and and chin in France on 25th July, is now in Lord Derby’s War Hospital, Warrington, and his many friends in Kiltearn and Dingwall will be pleased to know he is recovering as well as can be expected. Later information has been received to the effect that his right arm has been amputated. He is quite cheerful however, and wishes to thank all his comrades who have made kind enquiries about him. He wishes all the boys the best of luck.

Private Fraser voluntarily came forward to fight for King and country last November, and was in training in England till May, when he was sent to France, where he was a great favourite among his brave comrades.

He is the elder son of Mr D. Fraser, Foulis Mains, and Mrs Fraser. He served his apprenticeship as gardener in Foulis gardens, and was highly respected by his many friends in the district.

A photograph of Private Fraser appears today.

Photo: #6119

Gardner John, Capt, Glasgow Ex Evanton

Captain John Gardner

Date of Paper: 14.07.1916
Surname: Gardner
First Name(s): John
Rank: Captain
Regiment: 7th Royal Scots Fusiliers
Home Address: Aldersyde, 20 Dalziel Drive, Pollockshields, Glasgow

HONOUR TO AN EVANTON MAN

The above is a photograph of Temporary Captain John Gardner, 7th Royal Scots Fusiliers, who has just been awarded the Military Cross for “conspicuous gallantry under heavy shell fire”. He is the elder son of Mr Jno. Gardner, wholesale ironmonger, Brunswick Street, Glasgow, who resides at Aldersyde, 20 Dalziel Drive, Pollockshields. Captain Gardner, who is in his 21st year, was educated at the Glasgow Academy (where he was sergeant in the Cadet Corps), and in Germany. Early in 1914 he went to Philadelphia, U.S.A., to gain experience of business in the States, but immediately on the outbreak of war he came home to enlist, and obtained a commission in his present regiment.
His younger brother joined the 5th Camerons, and both were wounded at the battle of Loos. Captain Gardner gained the Military Cross for having “organised and led a counter-attack by men of his own battalion and men of the R.E., under very difficult circumstances, and set a fine example till incapacitated by a fragment of shell”. His many friends will be glad to hear that he was now completely recovered from his wound.

Captain Gardner is a grandson of the late Mr and Mrs Bisset, Drummond Arms, Evanton.

Photo: #7167

Graham Colin, Pte

Private Colin Graham

Date of Paper: 21.07.1916
Surname: Graham
First Name(s): Colin
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Mountrich, Dingwall

THE LATE PTE. COLIN GRAHAM

The death by shell shock of Pte. Colin Graham on the 25th of June has added the name of yet another Evanton boy to Britain’s long and lengthening Roll of Honour. Pte. Graham was attached to the Seaforth Highlanders, which formed part of the first British Expeditionary Force sent to France at the outbreak of war, and had consequently been through all the principal engagements on the Western frontier, from the famous retreat of Mons to the brilliant sally at the Marne, and the bloody after-fighting before Ypres in the Huns’ desperate but futile bid for Calais. Pte. Graham went through it all unscathed to be knocked out just as we were entering another, and, to be hoped, final phase of the war. He was a very likeable lad, very popular with all, and is deeply mourned by his sister and sorrowing mother, Mrs Macdonald, Mountrich, Dingwall, and his grandmother, Mrs Graham, Balconie Street, Evanton. Pte. Graham was 21 years old.