Invergordon WW I page 2

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Photo: #6228

Macivor D, Bombardier, Invergordon

Bombardier D. MacIvor

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918
Surname: MacIvor
First Name(s): D.
Rank: Bombardier
Regiment: R.G.A.
Home Address: Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon

ALNESS GUNNER GASSED

Bombardier D. MacIvor, Siege Battery, R.G.A., who was badly gassed on 20th May, is now in hospital in England. The only son of Mrs MacIvor, Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon, he joined up in 1918, has seen much service on the Western Front, and until gassed escaped the casualty list. He is understood to be recovering from the effects of the gas. Before the war he was a sawmiller with Messrs Paterson & Co., Invergordon.

A photo appears to-today.

Photo: #6268

Mackenzie Hugh, Pte, Invergordon

Private Hugh Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 07.01.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Private
Regiment: F (Invergordon) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 133, High Street, Invergordon

No Headline

1508 Private Hugh Mackenzie, F (Invergordon) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, is another of the Ross-shire heroes who fell at the battle of Neuve Chapelle on 11th March. Private Mackenzie, whose portrait we reproduce, was a son of Mr James Mackenzie, 133 High Street, Invergordon. He joined the 4th Seaforths in March 1913 and was mobilised in August of the following year. He went with the battalion to France in November 1914, after having celebrated his 23rd birthday at Bedford on the previous 20th October. Previous to the war he was driving an engine at Scotsburn. He was a good soldier and popular with his fellow men.

Photo: #6257

Mackintosh D F, Seaman, Invergordon

Seaman D. F. Mackintosh

Date of Paper: 09.11.1917
Surname: Mackintosh
First Name(s): D. F.
Rank: Seaman
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: Clyde Street, Invergordon

No Headline

Mr D. F. Mackintosh, who is the second son of Mrs Mackintosh, is canteen assistant on board one H.M.S. He has been two years in the Navy. Photographs of all three brothers appear to-day.
With Mrs Mackintosh there is deep sympathy in her bereavement.

Mrs Mackintosh, Clyde Street, Invergordon, who has been doubly bereaved by the war, gave two sons to the Seaforths and one to the Navy. Both soldier sons have made the supreme sacrifice.
As reported recently, Sergt. Wm. Mackintosh, was killed in action on the Western Front on October 12th. He took over command of his platoon after both the platoon officer and sergeant were killed, and carried on until he himself fell also. Sergt. Mackintosh, who was only 28 years of age, was considerably over a year in France, and in that time saw much fighting. Eight days before his death he was home on short leave, and his many friends were delighted to see him looking so fit after the dangers passed and hardships endured. He left again for the battlefield full of hope and in the most buoyant spirits. Few young men were better known or more highly esteemed in Invergordon than the deceased, and he was a favourite with his comrades in arms. Before joining up he conducted with much success his late father’s business as a carting contractor. An exemplary young man as a civilian, he proved a good and valiant soldier, and it is almost needless to say that his death is mourned by all ranks in the battalion to which he belonged.

Pte. Innes Mackintosh, Seaforths, a younger brother, who served with the Country Territorials, was killed in action on April 12, 1915. A young lad of 17 years, he mobilised a the outbreak of the war, and passed through the first winter in the trenches and through the battle of Neuve Chapelle unscathed. He was a fine type of lad, and his memory remains green among those who remain of the old B.E.F. Seaforths.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6269

Mackintosh Innes, Pte, Invergordon

Private Innes Mackintosh

Date of Paper: 28.04.1916
Surname: Mackintosh
First Name(s): Innes
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Clyde Street, Invergordon

No Headline

1695 Private Innes Mackintosh, 4th Seaforths, of which a portrait will be found in these columns, is one of the heroes from Ross-shire who fell early in the war. A son of the late Mr Angus Mackintosh, carter, and Mrs Mackintosh, Clyde Street, Invergordon, deceased, after leaving school, went to the grocery trade, being apprenticed to Mr T. Gordon, Bank Street, Invergordon. Always a keen Territorial, he joined as soon as he could be accepted, and when war broke out he answered the call, and in November, 1914, he proceeded to the front. He had his first experience of fire at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, through which he came unhurt, only, however, to fall a month later, on 12th April. At the time of his death he had only reached his 17th year. Earny, as he was familiarly called, was a proud soldier, happy, cheerful, and fearless, and with his comrades he was a great favourite. He was the youngest son of three, and the other two are Sergt. Wm. Mackintosh, 4th Seaforths, who, though time-expired, has rejoined, and Donald Mackintosh, who is serving aboard one of H.M. ships, and is at present in foreign waters.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6262

Mackintosh William, Sgt, Invergordon

Sergeant William Mackintosh

Date of Paper: 28.04.1916
Surname: Mackintosh
First Name(s): William
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Clyde Street, Invergordon

No Headline

1695 Private Innes Mackintosh, 4th Seaforths, of which a portrait will be found in these columns, is one of the heroes from Ross-shire who fell early in the war. A son of the late Mr Angus Mackintosh, carter, and Mrs Mackintosh, Clyde Street, Invergordon, deceased, after leaving school, went to the grocery trade, being apprenticed to Mr T. Gordon, Bank Street, Invergordon. Always a keen Territorial, he joined as soon as he could be accepted, and when war broke out he answered the call, and in November, 1914, he proceeded to the front. He had his first experience of fire at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, through which he came unhurt, only, however, to fall a month later, on 12th April. At the time of his death he had only reached his 17th year. Earny, as he was familiarly called, was a proud soldier, happy, cheerful, and fearless, and with his comrades he was a great favourite. He was the youngest son of three, and the other two are Sergt. Wm. Mackintosh, 4th Seaforths, who, though time-expired, has rejoined, and Donald Mackintosh, who is serving aboard one of H.M. ships, and is at present in foreign waters.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6749

Maclean James M, Pte, Duntocher

Private James McNeilage Maclean

Date of Paper: 03.12.1915
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): James McNeilage
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gordon Highlanders
Home Address: Invergordon

No Headline

Mr and Mrs Donald Maclean Duntocher, Dumbartonshire, received official information that their son, Pte. James McNeilage Maclean, machine gun section, 10th Gordon Highlanders, and grandson of the late Donald Maclean, Clyde Street, Invergordon, was killed in action on the 23rd September. He was 24 years of age, and enlisted at the outbreak of war. He served his apprenticeship as a shipwright with Messrs Napier & Miller, Old Kilpatrick.

Photo: #6226

Macleod Donald A, 2 Lieut, Invergordon

2nd Lieutenant Donald Angus Macleod

Date of Paper: 02.11.1917
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Donald A.
Rank: 2nd Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Invergordon

No Headline

2/Lieut. Donald Angus Macleod, KOSB, who died of wounds in a CCS in France on the 5th inst., was the second son of Mr and Mrs David Macleod, Dunvegan, Invergordon. He was twenty-six years of age, educated at the Invergordon Academy, and thereafter served his apprenticeship as chemist and druggist. At Edinburgh University he passed his examination as a pharmaceutical chemist, and, having secured an important appointment, went to London. He was not long in the city until he got an offer to go to China as representative for Messrs Watson & Coy., which offer he accepted, and successfully conducted business for them for several years in Hong Kong. When war broke out he joined the British Forces at Hong Kong, and remained with them for some time. Considering that this was not sufficient, he volunteered for active service in Europe, came home, and went to Gailes Camp, where he trained, and obtained a commission in the Gordon Highlanders, but was immediately transferred to the KOSB. He served with his battalion one month before being sent to France, and after six months hard fighting was fatally wounded by gunshot, and, as already stated, died without having regained consciousness.

His elder brother was adjutant in the Gordons, and is now attached to the RFC, in which he did some hard fighting, was severely wounded in the foot, and is at present in hospital in London.
Deep sympathy goes out to the relatives in their grievous loss of a son of much promise.

Photo: #6267

Manson Hope, Pte, Invergordon

Private Hope Manson

Date of Paper: 09.06.1916
Surname: Manson
First Name(s): Hope
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Mossfield, Invergordon

A ROSS-SHIRE FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

The sympathy of a wide circle of friends goes to Mr and Mrs George Manson and family, Mossfield, Invergordon, in the sore bereavements they have sustained through the loyalty of their sons to King and country.

Their eldest son, No. 7382 Pte. John Manson, who went through the South African campaign with the 1st Service Company of Seaforth Volunteers, winning the Queen’s Medal with four clasps, enlisted in the 1st Seaforth Highlanders on the outbreak of hostilities. After a period of training, he went to France with a draft [remainder obliterated].

See entry below for details of his brother John Manson

Photo: #6274

Manson John, Pte, Invergordon

Private John Manson

Date of Paper: 09.06.1916
Surname: Manson
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Mossfield, Invergordon

A ROSS-SHIRE FAMILY'S SACRIFICE

The sympathy of a wide circle of friends goes to Mr and Mrs George Manson and family, Mossfield, Invergordon, in the sore bereavements they have sustained through the loyalty of their sons to King and country.

Their eldest son, No. 7382 Pte. John Manson, who went through the South African campaign with the 1st Service Company of Seaforth Volunteers, winning the Queen’s Medal with four clasps, enlisted in the 1st Seaforth Highlanders on the outbreak of hostilities. After a period of training, he went to France with a draft [remainder obliterated].

See entry above for details of his brother Hope Manson

Photo: #6242

McCormick Christopher, Pte, Invergordon

Private Christopher McCormick

Date of Paper: 25.04.1919
Surname: McCormick
Forename: Christopher
Rank: Private
Regiment: 7th Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Balblair, Invergordon

THE LATE PTE. C. McCORMICK, BALBLAIR

Private Christopher McCormick, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, who gave his life for his country a year ago, enlisted in May 1917, and was soon in the thick of the turmoil on the Western Front. In the big German push of March 1918, he had the misfortune to be taken prisoner. Added to that was the fact that he was wounded, and on 7th April, 12 days after being captured, he died of wounds in a German hospital. A son of Mrs McCormick, Balblair, Invergordon, deceased was 35 years of age, and a gardener to trade.

A brother, Pte. Duncan McCormick, M.G. Battery, 4th Canadians, has now returned to Canada for demobilisation. Pte. McCormick, who is 29 years of age, was farming in the colony when the war broke out. He heard the call of the Motherland and responded. For two years he served on the Western Front and was twice wounded.

See entry below for details of his brother Duncan McCormick

Photo: #6253

McCormick Duncan, Pte, Invergordon

Private Duncan McCormick

Date of Paper: 25.04.1919
Surname: McCormick
Forename: Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: M.G. Battery, 4th Canadians
Home Address: Canada (formerly Balblair, Invergordon)

THE LATE PTE. C. McCORMICK, BALBLAIR

Private Christopher McCormick, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, who gave his life for his country a year ago, enlisted in May 1917, and was soon in the thick of the turmoil on the Western Front. In the big German push of March 1918, he had the misfortune to be taken prisoner. Added to that was the fact that he was wounded, and on 7th April, 12 days after being captured, he died of wounds in a German hospital. A son of Mrs McCormick, Balblair, Invergordon, deceased was 35 years of age, and a gardener to trade.

A brother, Pte. Duncan McCormick, M.G. Battery, 4th Canadians, has now returned to Canada for demobilisation. Pte. McCormick, who is 29 years of age, was farming in the colony when the war broke out. He heard the call of the Motherland and responded. For two years he served on the Western Front and was twice wounded.

See entry above for details of his brother Christopher McCormick

Photo: #6264

Morrison George, Pte, Australia Ex Invergordon

Private George Morrison

Date of Paper: 09.06.1916
Surname: Morrison
First Name(s): George
Rank: Private
Regiment: 14th Battalion Australian Imperial Force
Home Address: Australia (formerly Culcairn, Invergordon)

THE LATE PTE. GEO. MORRISON

Mr and Mrs Geo. Morrison, Culcairn, Invergordon, have now received official intimation that their eldest son, who was reported missing on 8th August last, was killed in action on that date at the Dardanelles.

Pte. Morrison emigrated to Australia three years ago, but the call to arms proved his patriotism, and, like many others who had left our shore, he took up arms in defence of the Motherland. He enlisted in the 14th Battalion Australian Imperial Force, with which he arrived in Egypt, going to the Peninsula now so famous on account of the gallent deeds performed by Australia’s sons. His parents have received a note of condolence from the King and Queen in their bereavement. The heartfelt sympathy of a wide circle of friends go out to his parents, sisters, and bother, who have endured such a long period of suspense. Pte. Morrison was a general favourite in the community.

Photo: #6233

Munro David, Driver, Invergordon

Driver David Munro

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): David
Rank: Driver
Regiment: Seaforths, then Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Ord, Invergordon

THE LATE DRIVER DAVID MUNRO

Driver David Munro, Seaforths, attached to Machine Gun Corps, was the youngest son of Donald Munro, Ord, Invergordon. Wounded on 2nd April, he died on 15th April in No. 3 General Hospital, France. Driver Munro enlisted in the Seaforths soon after mobilisation, and went through a short period of training at Dingwall. Joining the 1/4th Seaforths at Bedford, he went to France with the battalion in November 1914. He took part in all the engagements of his regiment, and came through scatheless. He was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps in November last. Prior to the war, Driver Munro was employed as a ploughman with Mr Paterson, Ord Farm, Invergordon.

A portrait of Driver Munro appears today.

Photo: #6271

Munro James R, Pte, Canada Ex Invergordon

Private James Robert Munro

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): James Robert
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Alberta, Canada (formerly Invergordon)

No Headline

Pte. “Jimmie” Munro, Canadians, killed in action (whose photo appears today), was the fourth son of the late James Munro, carpenter-contractor, late of Invergordon, having emigrated to Canada twelve years ago. The following is an extract from the Calgary News Telegram dated Friday, September 14th, 1917:

“Pte. James Robert Munro, who made the supreme sacrifice on August 25, was one of the most famed and popular football players in this city (Alberta, Canada). ‘Jimmie’as he was better known, went overseas with Lieut.-Colonel Robinson’s battalion, and after being in the trenches for only two months was killed in action. In civil life he was employed as a clerk with the Canadian Pacific Railway department of natural resources. He was a prominent member of the local YMCA basketball team. He was a born footballer, and captained the Scottish Junior International football team two years in succession, and played with the Callie Thistles. He was born at Ross-shire, Scotland, 21 years ago.

His brother, Donald, is still on active service, while another brother, George, is employed at Linton’s book-store at the present time.

He leaves also three sisters, Mrs McLean, in East Calgary; Mrs Boyd, in Sunnyside, and Ethan at home.”

Photo: #6236

Munro Murdo, Lieut, Invergordon

Second Lieutenant Murdo S. Munro

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Rifle Brigade
Home Address: Cherry Bank, Invergordon

THE LATE 2/LT. MURDO MUNRO, INVERGORDON

Second Lieutenant Murdo S. Munro, Rifle Brigade, who was killed in action on the 26th April, in his 28th year, was the son of the late Mr Simon Munro, and Mrs Munro, Cherry Bank, Invergordon. In the early stages of the war Mr Munro left a responsible position in Gatooma, Rhodesia, to come home to join the Forces. Immediately on arrival in this country, in November 1914, he enlisted in the K.R.R.C., and went out to France with his unit in December. He returned to this country suffering from frostbite, and, on recovery, was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade. On his return to France he was twice wounded and invalided home. Prior to his death in action, on April 26th, he had been in France for about three months. His sister has been on active service since the beginning of the war, and his eldest brother is with the Forces in South Africa.

The deceased officer had won the high esteem of his brother officers and of the men who served under him. In Invergordon, where the family is well known, the deepest regret is felt, and much sympathy goes out freely to Mrs Munro and her family in the sore bereavement they have sustained.

Photo: #6237

Paterson William G, Lieut, Invergordon

Lieutenant William G. Paterson

Date of Paper: 07.12.1917
Surname: Paterson
First Name(s): William Gunday
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Ord, Invergordon

No Headline

Lieut. William G. Paterson, Camerons, son of Mr W. G. Paterson, Ord, Invergordon, whose name appears in the Salonica dispatches published last week, has won the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in the field. Lieut. Paterson is a well known Ross-shire farmer, and managed the farm of Ord for his father until September 1914 – a month after the outbreak of war – when he joined the Lovat Scouts. After training he went East with his unit in 1915, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, remaining in the line till the evacuation, when he was one of the rearguard selected to cover the retirement. He next saw service with his unit in the Libyan, and when the Scouts had successfully accomplished their work in this zone, he transferred to the Camerons, and was posted to Salonica. He was home on leave in the summer of 1916.

Lieut. Paterson has received the ribbon of his decoration; the Military Cross itself falls to be presented on his return to the homeland. There was a considerable ceremony at the presentation of decorations in the field, and, according to a correspondent, the unit to which Lieut. Paterson is attached was specially complimented by the General commanding “for one of the best bits of work done on the Macedonian Front”. The circumstances under which Lieut. Paterson won his decoration are not yet officially published, and he himself has not disclosed the facts. Much satisfaction is expressed among his many friends in Easter Ross, and kindly congratulations are universally extended to the family.

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