Invergordon WW I page 1

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Photo: #6260

Calder John, Sgt, Invergordon

Sergeant John Calder

Date of Paper: 24.11.1916
Surname: Calder
First Name(s): John
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, 12 Clyde Street, Invergordon

THE LATE SGT. J. CALDER, SEAFORTHS

Sergeant John Calder, Seaforths, who died on 1st August last from wounds received on 26th July, was a nephew of Mrs W. Munro, Ivy Cottage, 12 Clyde Street, Invergordon, and of Miss M. Shaw, Easter Ardross, Alness.

The Officer Commanding his company, in a letter to deceased’s aunt, writes: “It is with deep regret that I have to inform you of the death of your nephew, who died of wounds in hospital. At the time of being wounded he had been acting Sergt.-Major, and was of the greatest assistance to the company, and his services will be greatly missed by us all. His comrades-in-arms held him in great esteem and deplore his loss. The sympathy of the officers and men of the battalion go out to you in your sad bereavement.”

Rev. John Macleod, chaplain to the regiment, writes – “I regret very much to have to inform you that your nephew, Sergt. Calder, died as the result of wounds received in action, and I write to say how deeply I sympathise with you. He was a brave soldier, who did his duty nobly and well, and everyone who knew him deeply regrets his death. His personal belongings will be sent to you by the Q.C. of the Field Ambulance where he died.” A photograph of Sergt. Calder appears to-day.

Photo: #6256

Cumming QMS, Invergordon

Quartermaster Sergeant Cumming

Date of Paper: 16.06.1916
Surname: Cumming
First Name(s): Not known
Rank: Quartermaster Sergeant
Regiment: Territorials
Home Address: 17, Outram Street, Invergordon

No Headline

[Obliterated] Cumming (36), who has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, was a Voluteer and Territorial of long standing in pre-war days, having joined in 1903. Before the war he was in the Post Office service at Invergordon, where, apart from his work in the local company of Territorials, of which he was colour-sergeant, he was Scoutmaster of the troop of Boy Scouts. In other affairs of the community he took a useful part, and was one of the most popular members of the Bowling Club. Married, his wife resides at 17 Outram Street. He has one daughter.

As a colour-sergeant he joined his battalion on mobilisation, and proceeded in due course to the front, where he has been since November, 1914. In June, 1915, he was promoted company sergeant-major, and in April of this year he got a step to his present rank. Two winters in the trenches, with two big engagements to his credit, and prolonged experience of the trenches from the day of his mobilisation, except when on leave, he never missed a parade, and has emerged from it all the picture of robust health, and with the spirit of a cheery optimist.

Quartermaster-Sergt. Cumming was home on furlough the other day, renewing old associations and enjoying his native air of Easter Ross (he belongs to Portmahomack)

The official statement of reasons for granting the D.C.M. has not been published, but there is known to the battalion more than one incident by which he well-earned the distinction.

[Handwritten note: “M & M 24.1.19”]

Photo: #6258

Duff David, Sgt, Invergordon

Photo: #6259

Duff David, Sgt, Invergordon

Sergeant David Duff

Date of Paper: 07.06.1918
Surname: Duff
First Name(s): David
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 19, Hugh Miller Street, Invergordon.

INVERGORDON SEAFORTH PRISONER OF WAR

A photo. is reproduced to-day of Sergt. David Duff, 4th Seaforths, one of the battalion signalling staff, who was captured by the Germans on 23rd March, and who, having been reported missing, greatly relieved the anxiety of his friends in Invergordon a fortnight ago by letters [overlaid piece obliterates part of text]

The Germans here seem to be very decent fellows; very warm hearted, and the lot we are attached to try to do all they can for us. We have coffee and bread in the morning, with, maybe, some butter; soup at four o’ clock or soup and rice; coffee and bread at five o’clock, so we are pretty well off considering. I would much rather have our own white bread than the brown we are getting. Also we miss our milk and the good old cup of tea or cocoa. However, when I send my permanent address you will be able to supplement things. Soap is pretty scarce too. Duff, a born comforter of the folk at home, makes light of his troubles, and has the philosophic outlook which finds expression in the old Scottish “We’re nae very bad, but we micht be waur”. He reassures his mother that he is as “happy as the birds in May,” and that “the war will not last for ever. In a post card of a day later he confirms the statement that the Germans are “extremely nice to us.” A German living near to him has a brother interned in England, and the battle link proved a strong one. Conversation had to be carried on in soldier’s French. “Cheerio; keep smiling,” is a parting message to his people at home. In passing it may be noted that Sergt. Duff speaks of his party as “we”, and that hope is expressed that along with him may be other signallers of the 4th Seaforths who are posted missing, including Pte. M. D. Revill, Dingwall, from whom, so far, no word has as yet been received.

Sergt. Duff, who was employed as a stationer in Invergordon before the war, mobilised with the battalion, and went to France in November, 1914, with the rest of the boys, so many of whom are no more. Except when home on leave, the last time in November last year, he has served throughout with the Seaforths, and has shared in all the vicissitudes and the glories of the famous 51st Division. With the Indian Corps he took part in the battles of Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge, and, of course, he endured that terrible first winter in France. He was a well known figure in the battalion, and he was a singular very popular personality.

Mrs Duff had another son in the Seaforths, also a signaller, Private Wm. Duff, who went out also in 1914, and who died of wounds in July, 1916.

See entry below for details of his brother William Duff

Photo: #6263

Duff William, Signaller, Invergordon

Signaller William Duff

Date of Paper: 25.08.1916
Surname: Duff
First Name(s): William
Rank: Signaller
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: 19, Hugh Miller Street, Invergordon.

INVERGORDON SEAFORTH DIES OF WOUNDS

Mr and Mrs Duff, 19 Hugh Miller Street, Invergordon, have received information that their third son,Signaller Wm. Duff, Seaforths, died on 27th July of wounds received in action. The chaplain (Rev. J. Macleod, Muir of Ord) in a letter to Mrs Duff, says: “With deep regret I have just heard your boy Willie has succumbed to his wounds, and I write to say how deeply I sympathise with you. I hope in this hour of sorrow you will derive comfort from the consciousness that your boy fell defending his country and the cause of righteousness and truth in the greatest battle in the history of our country. He was loved by his comrades, and his officers spoke highly of him. May I say you have much reason to thank the Lord for him and for his brother. I saw the Sergeant (the youngest) a few minutes ago, and he is very well; but naturally feels keenly the death of his brother. I hope you will have the comfort and the blessing that the Lord alone can give.”

Signaller Duff went out with the battalion in November, 1914, and remained at the front continuously until Christmas, 1915, when he had leave home. At Neuve Chapelle he was one of the battalion stretcher-bearers. Latterly he was attached to the signallers’ section. Before the war he was employed at Invergordon under a contractor.

Deceased was 25 years of age, and a young man of great promise. The deepest sympathy is felt with his parents and relatives. Of two surviving brothers of deceased, Sergt.Duff [remainder obliterated].

See entry above for details of his brother David Duff

Photo: #6239

Finlay Allan, Pte, Invergordon

Private Allan Finlay

Date of Paper: 07.06.1918
Surname: Finlay
First Name(s): Allan
Rank: Private
Regiment: Argyll and Sutherlands
Home Address: Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF ALNESS

Mr and Mrs John Finlay, Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon, have three sons in the Army, all of whom before joining up were ploughmen with Mr A.T. Gill, Rosskeen Farm, and one of whom, who wears the Military Medal, recently reported missing, is now a prisoner of war in Germany. All three sons joined up in 1915, before the “suggestion of the Tribunal” came to help people.

Pte John Finlay, Camerons, was wounded on May 7, 1917, and after hospital treatment was posted to an agricultural company, for which his skill pre-eminently fits him.

Pte. Henry Finlay, M.M., joined the Lovat Scouts, and subsequently transferred to the Camerons. He saw much service, and was continuously at the front, except during a period when in hospital with trench feet. A splendid soldier, the fact he won the Military Medal for service in the field speaks of his valour and grit. Pte. Finlay took part in the early battles of the German offensive, and was posted missing on 28th March. Happily the anxiety of his family has been greatly relieved by a post card received last week that he is a prisoner of war and wounded in Germany. Of late, by all accounts, wounded prisoners in Germany receive good attention, and hope is that he may be soon restored to health and released.

Pte. Allan Finlay, Argyll and Sutherlands, who also joined up in 1915, was sent to France about two months ago, where he is meantime in hospital with a somewhat severe illness.

The record of the Finlay family is a proud one, and friends will hope that all three sons may return safely to their old friends and pursuits.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6266

Finlay Henry, Pte, Invergordon

Private Henry Finlay

Date of Paper: 07.06.1918
Surname: Finlay
First Name(s): Henry
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lovat Scouts / Camerons
Home Address: Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF ALNESS

Mr and Mrs John Finlay, Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon, have three sons in the Army, all of whom before joining up were ploughmen with Mr A.T. Gill, Rosskeen Farm, and one of whom, who wears the Military Medal, recently reported missing, is now a prisoner of war in Germany. All three sons joined up in 1915, before the “suggestion of the Tribunal” came to help people.

Pte John Finlay, Camerons, was wounded on May 7, 1917, and after hospital treatment was posted to an agricultural company, for which his skill pre-eminently fits him.

Pte. Henry Finlay, M.M., joined the Lovat Scouts, and subsequently transferred to the Camerons. He saw much service, and was continuously at the front, except during a period when in hospital with trench feet. A splendid soldier, the fact he won the Military Medal for service in the field speaks of his valour and grit. Pte. Finlay took part in the early battles of the German offensive, and was posted missing on 28th March. Happily the anxiety of his family has been greatly relieved by a post card received last week that he is a prisoner of war and wounded in Germany. Of late, by all accounts, wounded prisoners in Germany receive good attention, and hope is that he may be soon restored to health and released.

Pte. Allan Finlay, Argyll and Sutherlands, who also joined up in 1915, was sent to France about two months ago, where he is meantime in hospital with a somewhat severe illness.

The record of the Finlay family is a proud one, and friends will hope that all three sons may return safely to their old friends and pursuits.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6273

Finlay John, Pte, Invergordon

Private John Finlay

Date of Paper: 07.06.1918
Surname: Finlay
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF ALNESS

Mr and Mrs John Finlay, Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon, have three sons in the Army, all of whom before joining up were ploughmen with Mr A.T. Gill, Rosskeen Farm, and one of whom, who wears the Military Medal, recently reported missing, is now a prisoner of war in Germany. All three sons joined up in 1915, before the “suggestion of the Tribunal” came to help people.

Pte John Finlay, Camerons, was wounded on May 7, 1917, and after hospital treatment was posted to an agricultural company, for which his skill pre-eminently fits him.

Pte. Henry Finlay, M.M., joined the Lovat Scouts, and subsequently transferred to the Camerons. He saw much service, and was continuously at the front, except during a period when in hospital with trench feet. A splendid soldier, the fact he won the Military Medal for service in the field speaks of his valour and grit. Pte. Finlay took part in the early battles of the German offensive, and was posted missing on 28th March. Happily the anxiety of his family has been greatly relieved by a post card received last week that he is a prisoner of war and wounded in Germany. Of late, by all accounts, wounded prisoners in Germany receive good attention, and hope is that he may be soon restored to health and released.

Pte. Allan Finlay, Argyll and Sutherlands, who also joined up in 1915, was sent to France about two months ago, where he is meantime in hospital with a somewhat severe illness.

The record of the Finlay family is a proud one, and friends will hope that all three sons may return safely to their old friends and pursuits.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #6276

Forsyth William J, Pte, Invergordon

Private William James Forsyth

Date of Paper: 17.11.1916
Surname: Forsyth
First Name(s): William James
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Camerons
Home Address: 122 High Street, Invergordon

INVERGORDON CAMERON DIES OF WOUNDS

Private William James Forsyth, Cameron Highlanders, who has died of wounds received in action on the 18th October, aged 19, is the second son of Mr George Forsyth, 122 High Street, Invergordon, late 78th Highlanders.

Private Forsyth joined the Lovat Scouts, and after some months training was transferred to the 4th Camerons at Ripon, and later drafted to another Cameron battalion. Before joining the colours Private Forsyth was in the employment of Wordie & Co., Invergordon. The deceased’s elder brother is wounded in England, but is making a good recovery.

The heartfelt sympathy of all who knew Pte. William Forsyth goes out to his sorrowing parents and their family in their great loss.

Photo: #6275

Graham Patrick H, Pte, Invergordon

Private Patrick Graham

Date of Paper: 24.11.1916
Surname: Graham
First Name(s): Patrick Halfpenny
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Outram Street, Invergordon

THE LATE PRIVATE P. GRAHAM, INVERGORDON

S/9749 Private Patrick Graham, died of wounds, was a son of Mrs Paul Graham, Outram Street, Invergordon. The deceased was wounded on 15th October, and died the following day in the 2/2 London Casualty Clearing Station, France. Pte. Graham, whose portrait is reproduced on this page, joined the Seaforths in December 1915 and went to the front some time ago. Prior to the war he was a printer in Invergordon. His companions regret his death sincerely and the sympathy of the whole community is extended to the sorrowing relatives.

When the Invergordon Roll of Honour is completed, foremost among those who have fought and bled and died for hearth and home in the Great War will be the names of the heroic family of Mr and Mrs Paul Graham, Outram Street, three of whom have made the supreme sacrifice, while two (including a son-in-law) have been sadly maimed. Above we reproduce the photo. of Private Patrick Halfpenny Graham, Seaforths, who on 16th October, 1916, fell fighting – as recalled in our last issue – in the forefront of the memorable conflict on the Somme.

[Handwritten note reads: “Brother Charles, Seaman, died 20.08.1818”]

Photo: #6238

Henderson, Major  Invergordon

Major Henderson

Paper: 07.05.1918
Surname: Henderson
First Name(s): No indication
Rank: Major
Regiment: Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address: Culcairn Farm, Invergordon

No Headline

No entry for Major Henderson

Photo: #6231

MacAndie Walter, Corp, Invergordon

Corporal Walter Macandie

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: MacAndie
Forename: Walter
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Saltburn, Invergordon

THE LATE CORPL. W. MACANDIE, SEAFORTHS

We reproduce today a photograph of Corpl. Walter Macandie, Seaforths, son of Mr W. Macandie, Saltburn, Invergordon. Corporal Macandie joined the county regiment shortly after the outbreak of war, and has been at the Front for nearly two years. A comrade, writing home, says: “He was killed when charging the German second line trenches, and was buried where he fell. Everybody in the company has a good word to say about him. The battalion was very heavily engaged, and did glorious work taking prisoners and guns.” Mr Macandie’s other son is also at the Front with the same regiment.

See entry below for details of his brother William MacAndie

Photo: #6277

MacAndie William, Pte, Invergordon

Private William Macandie

Date of Paper: 08.11.1918
Surname: MacAndie
Forename: William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Canada (formerly Saltburn, Invergordon)

No Headline

The photo of the late Pte. William Macandie, Seaforths, son of Mr Macandie, Saltburn, Invergordon, appears today. As recently reported, Pte. Macandie was killed on August 27th, 1918. 2/Lt. J. Manson, his platoon officer, writing to the father, says: “I am rather at a loss to know how to write you, but I feel that I may in some slight degree help to lighten the grief and pain of your sad bereavement by letting you know the circumstances of your sonís death. He was one of my platoon, and on August 27th we went into action. During the advance we got held up a bit, and came under very heavy fire from the enemy. It was then that your son was struck by a bullet. It may be some little consolation to know that death was instantaneous, and that he did not have to suffer any pain. His death is indeed a great loss to the platoon, and to all of us, as he was always so cheery and happy, and was a great favourite among the boys of the company. But he was all the time a man also, who went forward boldly in the advance, and, up to his death, set a grand example of courage and coolness, and he died like a soldier and was buried on the battlefield along with some comrades who, along with him, made the supreme sacrifice for their King and country. I offer you, Mr Macandie, my deepest and most heartfelt sympathy, and hope that God in His own time will heal the wound He has given, and that we shall all be able to say, Thy will be done.”

Pte. Macandie was in Canada when war broke out. He returned at the first opportunity in order to serve his country in his own Territorial battalion. In 1915 he joined the 4th Seaforths, and early in 1916 he went to France. He shared in the battle of Arras in April 1917, was wounded at CambraI in November 1917, and had returned to France only a few weeks before he made the supreme sacrifice.

His only and younger brother, Corpl. Walter Macandie, also of the 4th Seaforths, was killed in action on 9th April 1917, after nearly two years service. He fell near the Vimy Ridge, on ground familiar since then to the Seaforths. He too was a brave soldier. His officer wrote: ìHe died like a brave soldier, doing his duty. He was killed when charging the German second line trenches, and was buried where he fell..

There is deep sympathy with Mr Macandie and his family in their great sorrow.

See entry above for details of his brother Walter MacAndie

Photo: #7162

Macdonald D J, Trooper

Trooper Donald James Macdonald

Date of Paper: 04.04.1919
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Donald James
Rank: Trooper
Regiment: 9th Squadron, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Home Address: New Zealand, ex Rosskeen, Invergordon

No Headline

There is reproduced to day two sons of the Manse, Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., and Trooper Donald James Macdonald, sons of the Rev George Macdonald, late of Rosskeen, and Mrs Macdonald, now of 19 Mansionhouse Road, Edinburgh, who have done their bit in the war.

Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., was in Kensington, London, when he enlisted in January 1916. He served for a year in Mesopotamia, and subsequently in France and Flanders, where he is at present. He was attached to different regiments, including a Yorkshire battalion and a battalion of the Black Watch. Captain Macdonald, who is now 33 years of age, is married, and has a young son.

Trooper Donald James Macdonald, 9th Squadron, Wellington Mounted Rifles, New Zealand, who is 30 years of age, joined up in 1916, prior to which he was a farmer in Wairow, New Zealand. He served in Egypt and subsequently in Palestine. He was slightly wounded in the East, but has made a good recovery.

See entry below for details of his brother George Macdonald

Photo: #6229

Macdonald George, Capt, London Ex Invergordon

Captain George Macdonald

Date of Paper: 04.04.1919
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): George
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address: London, ex Rosskeen, Invergordon

No Headline

There is reproduced to day two sons of the Manse, Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., and Trooper Donald James Macdonald, sons of the Rev George Macdonald, late of Rosskeen, and Mrs Macdonald, now of 19 Mansionhouse Road, Edinburgh, who have done their bit in the war.

Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., was in Kensington, London, when he enlisted in January 1916. He served for a year in Mesopotamia, and subsequently in France and Flanders, where he is at present. He was attached to different regiments, including a Yorkshire battalion and a battalion of the Black Watch. Captain Macdonald, who is now 33 years of age, is married, and has a young son.

Trooper Donald James Macdonald, 9th Squadron, Wellington Mounted Rifles, New Zealand, who is 30 years of age, joined up in 1916, prior to which he was a farmer in Wairow, New Zealand. He served in Egypt and subsequently in Palestine. He was slightly wounded in the East, but has made a good recovery.

See entry above for details of his brother Donald Macdonald

Photo: #6232

Macdonald Joseph, Dr, Invergordon

Dr Joseph Macdonald

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Joseph
Rank: Doctor/Captain
Regiment: Senior Medical Officer
Home Address: Ellandonan Cottage, Saltburn, Invergordon, and Marydale, South Africa.

No Headline

The late Dr Joseph Macdonald, a notice of whose death from influenza in Marydale, South Africa, appeared in a recent issue of the Journal, was the fourth son of the late Mr John Macdonald, Glasgow Warehouse, Invergordon, and of Mrs Macdonald, Ellandonan Cottage, Saltburn, Invergordon, and brother of Mr John E. Macdonald, of the Glasgow Warehouse.

Twelve years ago Dr Macdonald graduated in Medicine in Aberdeen, and on completing his medical studies there he proceeded to South Africa to fill an important government position as medical officer. Later on he gave up this appointment, and took up a large and lucrative practice in Marydale, Cape Colony.

On the outbreak of war in South Africa he was one of the first to join the forces, and served for three years with the rank of captain. In 1915 he was appointed senior medical officer by General Smuts, but, owing to repeated attacks of malaria fever, he retired from the Army and resumed his private practice in Marydale.

There is reason to fear that the campaign in Western and Eastern Africa weakened his naturally robust constitution, and being overwhelmed with work in the exercise of a very extensive practice, and much too forgetful of himself in his devotion to duty and interests of his patients, he thus became an easy victim to the disease that brought so young, promising, and beneficient a life to a sudden and premature end. Much sympathy is felt with the relatives.

A photo of Dr Macdonald appears to day.

Photo: #6244

Macinnes Donald, Pte, Invergordon

Photo: #6243

Macinnes Donald, Pte, Invergordon

Callum Robertson (right) and son Marcas.

Photo: #6245

Macinnes Donald, Pte, Invergordon

L-r: Malcolm and Marcas Robertson

Private Donald Macinnes

Surname: Macinnes
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Army Service Corps.
Home Address: Invergordon, ex Canada and ex Portree Skye

No Headline

Private Donald Macinnes does not feature in the newspaper cuttings of 1914-18 lodged in Dingwall Museum but an article in The Ross-shire Journal of 29 September 2017 bringing him to the notice of readers suggests he is worthy of inclusion in this website. Information from the article written by Lynne Bradshaw and associated photographs are courtesy of the Editor of The Ross-shire Journal.

Donald Macinnes was born in Portree on Skye in 1887 and left the island as a teenager to work on ranches in Canada for nine years. When he returned to the Highlands in 1913 he became owner of the Commercial Hotel in Invergordon.

He married in 1915 and, although as an hotelier was exempt from war service, enlisted at Fort George in February 1917, did his training at Gateshead on Tyne with the RASC, and was transferred to the Royal Inniskilling Fusileers at a later date. He went to the front in June 1917 and was hospitalised the following month due to slight wounds and being gassed. On returning to his regiment he was killed by enemy machine-gun fire at Passchendaele on 23 September 1917 at the age of 30.. His daughter, Ima, was only a month old when her father was killed.

One hundreed years later, on the centenary of his death, and shortly after what would have been Ima’s 100th birthday, Callum Robertson, her son, and his sons, Malcolm and Marcas, gathered at Coxcyde military cemetery to honour Donald Macinnes. Marcas played three tunes on his bagpipes: Dark Island, Over the Sea to Skye, and the Sands of Kuwait. His brother Malcolm (aka Callum) wore a family heirloom, a ring gifted to Donald Macinnes.

The story behind the ring dates to the time when Donald Macinnes was working on a ranch in Canada. A barn containing horses went on fire but Donald managed to save them. Afterwards the owner of the ranch said he could replace the shed, but all his money and his business was in the horses, so he pulled a ring off his finger and gave it to Donald.