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Photo: #6183

Ross Alexander, Sgt, DCM, Fearn

Sergeant Alexander Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entries below for details of his five brothers

Photo: #6174

Ross David, L Corp, Fearn

Lance Corporal David Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): David
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entry above and entries below for details of his five brothers

Photo: #6187

Ross Duncan, Signaller, Fearn

Signaller Duncan Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Signaller
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entries above and below for details of his five brothers

Photo: #6180

Ross James, Pte, Fearn

Private James Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entries above and below for details of his five brothers

Photo: #6182

Ross Kenneth, Seaman, Fearn

Seaman Kenneth Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Seaman(?)
Regiment: Royal Navy
Home Address: Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entries above and entry below for details of his five brothers

No photo available

Corporal William Ross

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Rosenewton, Elgin (formerly Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn)

There is reproduced to-day photographs of six sons of Mr Alexander Ross, mason contractor, and Mrs Ross, Steel Cottage, Hill of Fearn, Ross-shire, all of whom have been or are serving their King and Country in the great war. With the exception of one who is missing, and is perhaps a prisoner of war, all are in touch with the old home at Hill of Fearn. The eldest son, who has just received the D.C.M., is wounded. The family record is a noble one, and the parents, despite constant anxieties, are proud of their children . The particulars of the different members of the family are given below:
Sergt. Alexander Ross (201337), Seaforths, has served for the second time on the Western front. He mobilised with the Ross-shires at the outbreak of war. His wife and family reside at Burnside Cottage, Portmahomack. As reported the other day, he was promoted Sergeant in the field and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field on 21st November, during the battle of Cambrai. Wounded in action he is now in Bangour Hospital, Edinburgh, and is understood to be making good progress. Sergt. Ross has spent two years on the Western front and is one of the best known and most fearless of the Seaforths. The battalion is heartily proud of the honour attained by Sergt. Ross, and will join with Ross-shire people in hearty congratulations and hopes for a speedy and complete recovery.

Corpl. Wm. Ross (106527), Canadians, mobilised with the 1st Canadian Contingent, and was wounded in November, 1915. His wife resides at Rosenewton, Elgin.

Pte. James Ross (5168), Seaforths, was wounded in France in September, 1915. Recovering, he rejoined, and is now with the Mesopotamian Field Force.

L./Corpl. David Ross (201807), Seaforths. Serving with the county battalion, he was wounded on September 20, 1917.

Signaller Duncan Ross, Seaforths, serving with a special service battalion, has been missing since 22nd August, 1916.

Kenneth Ross, the youngest son, is in the Navy, serving at present in a Northern port.

Handwritten notes: “James killed Palestine, June 26/18. 19.7.18. Alexander [unclear]”

See entries above for details of his five brothers

Photo: #6170

Ross Alistair, Corp, Fearn

Corporal Alistair Ross

Date of Paper: 15.09.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Alistair
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: 9th Battalion, 3rd Brigade, A.I. Forces
Home Address: Hilton, Fearn

ROSS-SHIRE ANZAC KILLED

Above we reproduce a photograph of Corporal Alistair Ross, son of Mr and Mrs A. M. Ross, Hilton, Fearn, and late of Dingwall, who, as we intimated in our last issue, was fatally wounded on 21st August, while fighting with his regiment in France. The sad news was forwarded by the chaplain of the 9th Battalion, 3rd Brigade, A.I. Forces. The chaplain gave him great praise for bravery, he having been wounded early in the action, and, although asked to retire by his commanding officer, he carried on until he was again wounded fatally. Before proceeding to New South Wales, he was for some time in the employment of Messrs C. & J. Urquhart, ironmongers, Dingwall. During his stay in Australia he was in the employment of the North Coast Co-operative Coy., the proprietors of one of the largest creameries in the world, and before leaving to join the colours he was made the recipient of handsome testimonials. He was present during the stay of the Australians in Gallipoli, and afterwards in Egypt. He attained the rank of corporal, and was a great favourite with officers and men. He was 22 years of age at the time of his death.

It may be stated that Mr Ross has three sons with the colours: Lieut. D. H. Ross, 23rd Battalion, 6th Brigade, A.I.F.; Coy.-Sergt.-Major K. Ross, 1/4th Seaforths; and Corpl. Richard H. Ross, 8th Seaforths.

No photo available

Sergeant Andrew Ross

Date of Paper: 22.02.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Andrew
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lower Balaldie, Fearn

Sgt. Andrew Ross, M.M., Seaforths, Lower Balaldie, Fearn, who returned to France a few days ago, after being in England some time recovering from his wounds, has been at the front practically since the outbreak of hostilities. A splendid type of soldier, strong, courageous, although three times wounded in stress of battle, many acts of heroism have been performed by him, and many have passed unnoticed by those who had the power to recommend him to a higher distinction than he has won. It is well known that throughout the campaign he displayed a spirit of self-sacrifice that proved an inspiration to those that fought side by side with him. A few weeks ago, while on draft leave, Sergt. Ross was met at his home by his many friends in Fearn and surrounding district, and presented with a purse of money in appreciation of his conspicuous gallantry.

Photo: #6700

Ross David G, 2 Lieut, Birmingham Ex Balintore

Lieutenant David G. Ross

Date of Paper: 22.11.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): David. G.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: 15th Royal Warwicks
Home Address: 302, Mansel Road, Small Heath, Birmingham.

2/Lieut. David G. Ross, 15th Royal Warwicks, attached 3rd Worcestershire Regiment, who as already reported, was killed in action on the Western Front on September 5, 1918, was the son of Mr and Mrs Andrew M. Ross, 302 Mansel Road, Small Heath, Birmingham. The mother of deceased is a Birmingham lady; his father who is a native of Balintore, Fearn, and a brother of Mr A .M. Ross formerly of the North Star, Dingwall, will be remembered best in Ross-shire as one of the staff, many years ago, of Invergordon Post Office.

Lt. Ross, a photo. of whom appears to-day, was educated at Small Heath Secondary School, and took a great interest in cricket and football in connection with his school. In August,1914, he enlisted at the age of 17 in the 2nd Birmingham City Battalion, Royal Warwicks, one of the three battalions raised by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham. In November, 1915, he proceeded to France, where he saw much fighting. In May this year he obtained his commission in the Worcester Regiment. Before the war he was apprenticed to the motor engineering with Messers Alldays & Onions of Birmingham. A fine soldier, he well sustained the traditions of a family which has a fine record of service and has suffered much in the Great War.

Two cousins, one the son of Mrs Mackay, Tain, and another son of Mr A. M. Ross, Fearn, have been killed, while three other cousins have been severely wounded, and two of them discharged. Lieut. Kenny Ross, Seaforths, the idol of the 1/4th battalion, is one of the cousins, and L./Cpl. Richard Ross, 7th Seaforths, a Midland journalist, well remembered in Dingwall, is another.

With the parents of this fine young officer in their heavy loss there is much sympathy here in Ross-shire, where the family associations are deep and intimate.

Photo: #5886

Ross Robert, Sgt, Balintore

Sergant Robert Ross

Date of Paper: 22.0.9.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 1, Bank Street, Balintore, Fearn, Ross-shire

THE LATE SERGT. ROSS, SEAFORTHS

As briefly announced last week, Sergant Robert Ross, Seaforths, whose home is at 1 Bank Street, Balintore, Fearn, Ross-shire, has been killed in action. Sergt. Ross, who was 22 years of age, was a native of Portmahomack, and had been at the front since November, 1914. He had come through scathless the severe engagements in which his battalion has taken part until he met his fate on the 15th August.

A pathetic circumstance connected with Sergt. Ross’s death is that he was married only about two months ago, and the deepest sympathy is felt for his young widow.

In addition to a most appreciative letter from Sergt-Major Burnett, the bereaved widow has received the following letter form Lieut J. MacGregor Mills: “It is with great regret that I have to report to you that your husband was killed in action yesterday morning at seven. I can realise what a loss this is to you, for we ourselves have learned to love and admire him. As my section sergeant for many months, we have gone through much together. In the tightest corners, he has always been the one I looked to, and never has he failed. Cool, and strong, and resolute, he has proved himself the finest soldier I have met in my experience as an officer. In the three weeks we were in the thick of it, he bore a charmed life, and it [remainder missing].”

Photo: #6186

Ross William J, Sgt, Fearn

Corporal William John Ross

Date of Paper: 05.11.1915
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): William John
Rank: Corporal / Sergeant
Regiment: 1st Scots Guards
Home Address: Clay of Allan, Fearn

Corporal W. J. Ross, 1st Scots Guards, wounded on 27th September, is a son of Mr Donald Ross, Clay of Allan. He enlisted in October, 1914, and went to France in April. Previous to enlisting he was a police constable at Kilwinning, Ayrshire. He is 24 years of age, and was educated at Maryburgh Public School.

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917

As recently reported, Mr Donald Ross, Rhynie, Fearn, has lost his only son, 11552 Sergt. Wm. John Ross, D.C.M., Scots Guards, who was killed in action on 15th October, 1918, on the Western Front. A photo appears to-day. Deceased was out with his company on patrol when he was hit by machine gun fire and instantly killed. Sergt. Ross joined the famous 1st Guards in October, 1914, and went to France in April following. He was wounded at the battle of Loos in 1915, and rejoined on recovering, since then he has seen much fighting. He was awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous gallantry in the field under the following circumstances, as related in the London Gazette a fortnight ago: “For exceptional gallantry and resource. When the difficulties of an attack were greatly increased by intense fog, gas shells, and counter-barrage, this N.C.O., acting as Company-Sergt.-Major, rendered the greatest service to his officers by the wonderful example and untiring energy which he displayed, and which had the most inspiring effect on the men of his company.” Twenty-seven years of age, he was a fine type of Scots Guardsman. Educated at Maryburgh School, he was a police constable at Kilwinning, Ayrshire. when he joined up. Deep sympathy is felt with the family in their bereavement.

In a letter addressed to Miss Ross, deceased’s sister, the Rev. Innes Logan. the well known chaplain of the 1st Scots Guards, says:- “I fear I have very sad news for you concerning your brother, Sergt Ross, D.C.M. On 15th October, while out with his company on patrol, he was hit by a machine gun bullet. I greatly regret to say he was instantly killed. I laid him to rest in the presence of his commanding officer, while the pipers played a lament yesterday (22nd October) at 3.30. He was one of the finest men in the battalion, and he will be greatly missed. We honour his memory, and his comrades beg me to say how deeply they feel for you in this great sorrow. We pray that as time passes you may find some consolation in the thought that he died fighting gallantly for a noble purpose.

Sergt, Ross was Acting Sergt-Major at the time.” A copy of the funeral service of the Guards accompanied the Chaplain’s letter.

Photo: #6178

Skinner Donald, Pte, Fearn

Private Donald Skinner

Date of paper: 24.11.1916
Surname: Skinner
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balaldie, Fearn

FEARN SEAFORTH WEDS

We reproduce a photograph of Private Donald Skinner, Seaforths, who was married in the Free Church Manse, Fearn, on the 7th inst. to Miss Isabella Macintosh, Bridge Street, Inverness. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. George Mackay. The marriage feast was served at Balaldie by Mrs Skinner, at which there were 26 couples. A number of congratulatory telegrams were read, including some from comrades of Pte Skinner’s in the trenches. The gifts were numerous and valuable. Pte. Skinner was mobilised in November, 1914, and went to France with his regiment. He was time expired but has rejoined, and is now back with his battalion at the front.

Photo: #6169

Sutherland Alick C, Corp, Fearn

Corporal Alick C. Sutherland

Date of Paper: 08.09.1916
Surname: Sutherland
First Name(s): Alick C.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lochslin Cottage, Fearn

Above we reproduce the photographs of three Easter Ross boys who have been doing their duty at the front. Two of them are sons of Mr and Mrs Sutherland, Lochslin Cottage, Fearn, while the third is the oldest son of Mr A. Cameron, Nigg Farm, and a son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Sutherland.

Corporal Alick C. Sutherland, the second son, who went to France with the Territorial Seaforths in November 1914, was home time-expired in May last. He rejoined, and since then has been with the reserve battalion. Previous to the war Corporal Sutherland was employed by Mr Henderson, Marchmont Crescent, Edinburgh.

12456 Corporal David Sutherland, the eldest son, was, previous to the war, a police constable in London. He came to his home and enlisted in February of this year. He put in three months’ training in Ross-shire, and has since been drafted to a battalion of the Seaforths in France.

Date of Paper: 10.11.1916

FEARN SEAFORTH WOUNDED

Today we reproduce a photograph of Lance-Corpl. David Sutherland, who was one of the many brave Seaforths who suffered in the recent “push” on the Western front. Official intimation has been received by his parents that he is wounded, and in hospital at Aberdeen, where he is making a satisfactory recovery. Lance-Corporal Sutherland is suffering from a gunshot wound in the right thigh, and his many friends in Easter Ross and elsewhere will be pleased to know he is getting on well. Before the war Lance-Corpl. Sutherland was a member of the London Police Force.

He is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Sutherland, Lochside Cottage, Fearn, whose other son, Corpl. A. Sutherland, and their son-in-law, Sergt. A. Cameron, are also on active service. All will wish Lance-Corporal Sutherland a speedy and complete recovery from his wounds.

See entry below for details of his brother David Sutherland

Photo: #6172

Sutherland David, Corp, Fearn

Corporal David Sutherland

Date of Paper: 08.09.1916
Surname: Sutherland
First Name(s): David
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Lochslin Cottage, Fearn

Above we reproduce the photographs of three Easter Ross boys who have been doing their duty at the front. Two of them are sons of Mr and Mrs Sutherland, Lochslin Cottage, Fearn, while the third is the oldest son of Mr A. Cameron, Nigg Farm, and a son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Sutherland.

Corporal Alick C. Sutherland, the second son, who went to France with the Territorial Seaforths in November 1914, was home time-expired in May last. He rejoined, and since then has been with the reserve battalion. Previous to the war Corporal Sutherland was employed by Mr Henderson, Marchmont Crescent, Edinburgh.

12456 Corporal David Sutherland, the eldest son, was, previous to the war, a police constable in London. He came to his home and enlisted in February of this year. He put in three months’ training in Ross-shire, and has since been drafted to a battalion of the Seaforths in France.

Date of Paper: 10.11.1916

FEARN SEAFORTH WOUNDED

Today we reproduce a photograph of Lance-Corpl. David Sutherland, who was one of the many brave Seaforths who suffered in the recent “push” on the Western front. Official intimation has been received by his parents that he is wounded, and in hospital at Aberdeen, where he is making a satisfactory recovery. Lance-Corporal Sutherland is suffering from a gunshot wound in the right thigh, and his many friends in Easter Ross and elsewhere will be pleased to know he is getting on well. Before the war Lance-Corpl. Sutherland was a member of the London Police Force.

He is the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Sutherland, Lochside Cottage, Fearn, whose other son, Corpl. A. Sutherland, and their son-in-law, Sergt. A. Cameron, are also on active service. All will wish Lance-Corporal Sutherland a speedy and complete recovery from his wounds.

See entry above for details of his brother Alick Sutherland

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