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Photo: #5735

Munro George, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal George Munro

Date of Paper: 12.07.1918
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): George
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: The Kennels, Ardross

THE LATE L./CPL. GEORGE MUNRO, ALNESS

L./Cpl. George Munro, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 18th April last, was the second son of the late Mr George Munro, farmer, Strathrusdale, Alness, and of Mrs Munro, The Kennels, Ardross. Deceased, whose photograph and that of his brother, missing since October 4, 1917, appears today, was 36 years of age, and was for 14 years a keeper on Ardross estate. He joined the Army in 1916, and went to France early in 1917. He took part in the battle of Arras, where he was wounded. On recovering, he rejoined at Ripon, and later on returned to the Western Front, fell, as stated, in the second phase of the great German offensive.

Mrs Munro has had many letters of sympathy in her hour of trial and mourning, and none of them more prized than the kindly inspiring message direct from the line battalion of Seaforths so intimately associated with the county in peace and war. Captain Hector C. S. Munro (of Foulis) wrote: “It is with deepest sympathy that I write to condole with you on the death in action of your son, George. He had been doing splendidly in the officers’ mess of the company, and I always liked him so much. He was such a fine, honest, straightforward fellow, who always gave of his best. Personally, I feel his loss very keenly. The deepest sympathy of all goes out to you in your sad bereavement. I am sure you will bear your loss as a soldier’s mother always does, knowing that George could not have given his life in a more gallant manner or in a nobler cause.”

The Rev. Jas. Black, C.F., who succeeded the late Rev. James Kirk, killed in action, says: “Your son was so severely wounded that he did not suffer much or long, and he was buried in one of the British cemeteries ….. I pray God may keep and [remainder obliterated].”

Q.M. and Hon. Captain Donald Munro (Dingwall) writes: “He fell early in the action of April 13, and it will be some comfort to you to know that he did not suffer. During the short time he was with us he gained the confidence and esteem of all. He was perfectly fearless, and his calm coolness under the most trying conditions helped others greatly. His company officers had the greatest respect for him. Personally, having known him since our school days, I was glad to renew our friendship out here after an interval of over 25 years. Though his nearest and dearest must grieve for him now, your feelings must be tinged with pride at the thought of how gallantly he laid down his life, so that those at home might gain the victory and peace.”

See entry below for details of his brother John Mackenzie Munro

Photo: #5736

Munro John L, L Corp, Salisbury ex Alness

Lance Corporal John Mackenzie Munro

Date of Paper: 25.01.1918
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): John Mackenzie
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Aldward House, Alderbury, Salisbury, Wilts.

Lance-Corporal John Mackenzie Munro, S/40234, Seaforths, son of the late Mr George Munro, farmer, Strathrusdale, Alness, who is reported missing since October 4, 1917, joined the Seaforths at Dingwall in September 1914 and was Sergt.-Piper in the 2/4th battalion until July 1916, when he sacrificed his rank to go to France. It may be recalled that for a time he was sole piper to the 4th (Res.) Seaforths at Dingwall. Lance-Cpl. Munro took part in the battle of Arras in April 1917, when he was wounded. Subsequently he returned to France and joined a regular battalion.

Before the war he was a stalker on Gildermorie with Colonel Shoolbred, and later was a gamekeeper at Alderbury. Any information which would throw light on his possible fate will be gratefully received by L-Corpl. Munro’s wife, who resides at Aldward House, Alderbury, Salisbury, Wilts.

His mother resides at The Kennels, Ardross, Alness.

See entry above for details of his brother George Munro

Photo: #5804

Ross J E (Ian), Capt, Egypt ex Ardross

Captain J. E. (Ian) Ross

Date of Paper: 21.07.1916
Surname: Ross
First Names: J. E. (Ian)
Rank: Captain
Regiment: King’s Liverpool Regiment
Home Address: Egypt (formerly Ardross)

THE LATE CAPTAIN IAN ROSS

Above will be found a portrait of the late Captain Ian Ross, King’s Liverpool Regiment, whom we reported as having died of wounds in our issue of 5th May last. The only son of Mr John Ross, of Alexandria, Egypt, both on the father’s and the mother’s side Captain Ross was a Ross-shire man. The father – a native of Ardross – is one of the best known men in Egypt, to which he set out from Dingwall in 1863. He took an active part in the incidents which led to the British occupation of Egypt. The mother is a daughter of the late Mr MacGilchrist Ross, Teaninich.

Captain Ian Ross is an old Loretto boy, distinguished as a student and popular in the field of sport, where, as a reserve for Scotland in 1913-14, he was a well-known exponent of the Rugby game. On completing his educational studies, he proceeded to Liverpool, and when war broke out he was studying the conditions of the cotton industry there, with a view later on of transferring his activities to the wide field of development which lies waiting peace in Egypt. He continued his interest in football in Liverpool, and was prominent in Liverpool and Lancashire Rugby circles.

Twenty-three years of age, deceased joined the Liverpool regiment in 1914, and subsequently was promoted to Captain’s rank. He was a fine type of officer, much beloved by his men and esteemed by all who knew him.

Photo: #5745

Stevenson Alexander R, Pte, Alness

Private Alexander Ronald M. Stevenson

Date of paper: 30.05.1919
Surname: Stevenson
First Name(s): Alexander Ronald M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stittenham Cottage, Ardross

THE LATE PTE. ALEXANDER RONALD M. STEVENSON

It is with deep regret that the announcement is made of the death of Pte. Alexander Ronald M. Stevenson, who passed away suddenly at the General Hospital, Stobhill, Glasgow. Deceased, who was the only son of Mr and Mrs Stevenson, Stittenham Cottage, Ardross, Alness, joined the 4th Seaforth Highlanders in July, 1918, and received his training at Glencorse. Latterly he was transferred in to the 53rd Gordon Highlanders, and finished his training at Tillicoultry. He was at his home at Stittenham a few weeks ago on draft leave before proceeding to the Rhine, but on his way back to join his regiment he took ill, and was sent to the General Hospital, Stobhill. Dick, by which name he was familiarly know, was of a kind and lovable disposition, and was a great favourite in the district to which he belonged. He was held in the highest esteem, and as a comrade writes from the Rhine, “his equals are but few”. His remains were brought home and buried with military honours in Rosskeen Cemetery, the funeral being the largest ever witnessed in the district.. The sympathy of the whole community goes out to the sorrowing parents and sisters in their sore and sudden bereavement.

A photograph of the deceased appears to-day. “He hath answered the roll call above and rests in perfect peace.”

Photo: #5808

Stewart Donald, Pte, NZ ex Ardross

Private Donald Stewart

Date of Paper: 13.06.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealand Force
Home Address: Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness

ARDROSS FAMILY WITH THE COLOURS

Private Donald Stewart, New Zealand Force, enlisted in August, 1914, shortly after the outbreak of war, and while he was farming. He was at the Gallipoli landing, and did not come off the peninsula until laid low with dysentery. Subsequently he served in France, and in October, 1916, he received wounds, from which he died in the No. 1 Australian C.C.S. on 28th October. Only 23 years of age, he was a capital shot, and in both the East and West Fronts his services were utilised as a sniper.
Private Ian A. Stewart, R.A.M.C., aged 22, was a bank clerk when he enlisted in November, 1915, and was attached to the 97th Field Ambulance. For two years he served in Belgium and France as a stretcher-bearer. In August, 1918, he has the misfortune to be slightly gassed, but has now recovered. Private Kenneth Stewart, Lovat Scouts, mobilised with his regiment at the age of 17, prior to which he was engaged in farming.

These three soldiers, whose photographs are reproduced to-day, are sons of Mr and Mrs K. Stewart, Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5809

Stewart Ian A, Pte, Ardross

Private Ian A. Stewart

Date of Paper: 13.06.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Ian A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address: Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness

ARDROSS FAMILY WITH THE COLOURS

Private Donald Stewart, New Zealand Force, enlisted in August, 1914, shortly after the outbreak of war, and while he was farming. He was at the Gallipoli landing, and did not come off the peninsula until laid low with dysentery. Subsequently he served in France, and in October, 1916, he received wounds, from which he died in the No. 1 Australian C.C.S. on 28th October. Only 23 years of age, he was a capital shot, and in both the East and West Fronts his services were utilised as a sniper.
Private Ian A. Stewart, R.A.M.C., aged 22, was a bank clerk when he enlisted in November, 1915, and was attached to the 97th Field Ambulance. For two years he served in Belgium and France as a stretcher-bearer. In August, 1918, he has the misfortune to be slightly gassed, but has now recovered. Private Kenneth Stewart, Lovat Scouts, mobilised with his regiment at the age of 17, prior to which he was engaged in farming.

These three soldiers, whose photographs are reproduced to-day, are sons of Mr and Mrs K. Stewart, Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5810

Stewart Kenneth, Pte, Ardross

Private Kenneth Stewart

Date of Paper: 13.06.1919
Surname: Stewart
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness

ARDROSS FAMILY WITH THE COLOURS

Private Donald Stewart, New Zealand Force, enlisted in August, 1914, shortly after the outbreak of war, and while he was farming. He was at the Gallipoli landing, and did not come off the peninsula until laid low with dysentery. Subsequently he served in France, and in October, 1916, he received wounds, from which he died in the No. 1 Australian C.C.S. on 28th October. Only 23 years of age, he was a capital shot, and in both the East and West Fronts his services were utilised as a sniper.
Private Ian A. Stewart, R.A.M.C., aged 22, was a bank clerk when he enlisted in November, 1915, and was attached to the 97th Field Ambulance. For two years he served in Belgium and France as a stretcher-bearer. In August, 1918, he has the misfortune to be slightly gassed, but has now recovered. Private Kenneth Stewart, Lovat Scouts, mobilised with his regiment at the age of 17, prior to which he was engaged in farming.

These three soldiers, whose photographs are reproduced to-day, are sons of Mr and Mrs K. Stewart, Crannich Farm, Ardross, Alness.

See entries above for details of his two brothers