Attribution: WikiImages from Pixabay

You are welcome to comment on these pictures

Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society welcome further information and comments about any person or photos on our website. Adding a comment means that you accept our Privacy Policy.

No photo available

Corporal Alexander Ross

Date of Paper: 05.07.1940
Surname: Ross
Forename(s): Alexander
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: 2 Millcraig Cottages, Alness

Handwritten notes: “Son of Mr and Mrs J. Ross, 2 Millcraig Cottages, Alness. Missing. Employment – tractor driver. Prisoner of War 4th October, 1940. Liberated 18th May, 1945.”

No photo available

George Ross

Date of Paper: 20.10.1944
Surname: Ross
Forename(s): George
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Lovat Scouts
Home Address: Balnacraig, Alness

WOUNDED

Mr and Mrs R. Ross, Balnacraig, Alness, have received information that their son, George, has been wounded in Italy. There are other three sons of Mr and Mrs Ross serving in the Lovat Scouts.

No photo available

Private John Scobie

Date of Paper: 19.07.1940
Surname: Scobie
Forename(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: 3 Top Street, Coulhill, Alness

Pte. John Scobie, Camerons, missing, resided at 3 Top Street, Coulhill, Alness. A reservist, he was employed at Teaninich Distillery when he was recalled to the Colours.

Handwritten notes: “Prisoner of War 23rd August, 1940. Liberated 18th May, 1945.”

No photo available

Private Alexander Shearer

Date of Paper: 16.08.1940
Surname: Shearer
Forename(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Achindunie, Alness

Handwritten notes: “Missing brothers. Prisoners of War 6th Sept., 1940. Liberated 18th May, 1945.”

See entry below for details of his brother George Shearer

No photo available

Private George Shearer

Date of Paper: 16.08.1940
Surname: Shearer
Forename(s): George
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Achindunie, Alness

Handwritten notes: “Missing brothers. Prisoners of War 6th Sept., 1940. Liberated 18th May, 1945.”

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Shearer

No photo available

Private John Sinclair

Date of Paper: Date obliterated
Surname: Sinclair
Forename(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Little Glaich, Edderton / Dalmore, Alness

Sinclair

Killed in action in Western Europe, in March 1945, Private John Sinclair, The Seaforth Highlanders, only son of the late George Sinclair, Little Glaich, Edderton, and Dalmore, Alness.

No photo available

Drummer David Stewart

Date of Paper: 13.11.1942
Surname: Stewart
Forename(s): David
Rank: Drummer
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: The Cottage, Alness

It was with deep regret that the village of Alness learned on Monday that Drummer David Stewart, The Seaforths, youngest son of Mrs Stewart, The Cottage, Alness, had died of wounds received in action in the Middle East. On the previous Thursday Mrs Stewart received official notification that David had been wounded on 25th October, and had been taken to hospital. Hopes were entertained that his wounds might not be serious, but these were shattered when official notification was received that he had passed away on 26th October. Prior to joining The Seaforths over two years ago, David, who was a butcher to trade, was employed by Messrs Mackenzie Bros., Invergordon. As a vanman he was most popular, and his cheerful, courteous manner endeared him to all. A drummer in the old Boy Scout Band, David soon gained for himself a place in the Battalion Band, and was playing in the recent broadcast made by The Seaforth Band prior to their going overseas. To his widowed mother, his brothers, William John, serving with the Royal Engineers, and Hector, Instructor to the Ross-shire Home Guard, and previously a Sergeant in The Seaforths, and his sisters, Bessie and Irene, the sympathy of the community goes out.

No photo available

Sergeant Hector Stewart

Date of Paper: 12.07.1940
Surname: Stewart
Forename(s): Hector
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: 18 High Street, Alness

Sergeant Hector Stewart, The Seaforths, has been admitted to hospital in England suffering fromn gunshot wounds in the left foot. He is a son of Mrs F. Stewart, 18 High Street, Alness. Prior to the war he was employed in the General Post Office, Glasgow. A well known footballer, before going south he played with Ross County, Inverness Caledonian and Muir of Ord Rovers. A keen piper, he was at one period in the pipe band.

No photo available

Corporal Harry Stoddart

Date of Paper: 04.08.1944
Surname: Stoddart
Forename(s): Harry M.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: 24 Kennedy Terrace (or 43 Nicholson Street), Wick, ex-Alness

STODDART

Died of wounds received in action in France, July 1944, Corporal Harry Stoddart, Cameron Highlanders, youngest son of the late Mr and Mrs William Stoddart, West End, Alness, and dearly beloved husband of May Page, 24 Kennedy Terrace, Wick, aged 26 years. They died that we might live. Inserted by his sisters and brothers, at home and abroad.

Official news has been received by Mrs Stoddart, 43 Nicholson Street, Wick, that her husband, Cpl. Harry M. Stoddart, has died of wounds in Normandy. Before being called up two years ago, he was employed as a bricklayer in Wick with Messrs Watson, public contractors. He served with the 51st Division in the North African and Sicilian campaigns. Corporal Stoddart is survived by his wife and young son, also three sisters and two brothers, one serving in Italy, to all of whom deepest sympathy is extended in their sore loss. Mrs Stoddart is a daughter of the late Mr R. Page and of Mrs Page, Kennedy Terrace, Wick (formerly of Malcolm Street). Corporal Stoddart was the youngest son of the late Mr and Mrs Wm. Stoddart, Whitehouse, Alness, and served his apprenticeship with Messrs Tuach & Son, mason contractors, Invergordon. He was well known and a general favourite.

No photo available

Private John Sutherland

Date of Paper: 12.07.1940
Surname: Sutherland
Forename(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Clashnabuiac Farm, Alness

SEAFORTH PRESUMED KILLED

Mrs J. Bain, Clashnabuiac Farm, Alness, has received official intimation from the War Office that her son, Pte. John Sutherland, The Seaforths, is now presumed killed on 4th June, 1940. Pte. Sutherland, who belonged to the County Regiment, crossed to France early in 1940. He took part in the battle of St. Valery in June 1940 and was reported missing. Prior to the war he was employed on the farm at home. Much sympathy will be extended to his sorrowing mother.

Handwritten notes: “Missing. Employed on farm. Reported dead 2nd May, 1941. Presumed killed by W.O. 19th Sept., 1941.”

No photo available

Private Robert Sutherland

Date of Paper: 05.07.1940
Surname: Sutherland
Forename(s): Robert
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: No. 1 Obsdale, Alness

Handwritten notes: “Son of Mrs A. Mackenzie, No. 1 Obsdale, Alness. Missing. Employment – Telegram Messenger, Alness GPO. Prisoner of War 9th August, 1940. Liberated 18th May, 1945.”

No photo available

Private David Alexander Taylor

Date of Paper: 05.02.1943
Surname: Taylor
Forename(s): David Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Army Observer Corps
Home Address: Station Cottage, Alness

TAYLOR

Killed in action at Hong Kong, on 22nd December 1941, Pte. David Alexander Taylor, RAOC, beloved youngest son of James Taylor, Station Cottage, Alness

No photo available

Private William Thom

Date of Paper: 21.06.1940
Surname: Thom
Forename(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Millcraig, Alness

Private William Thom, Seaforth Highlanders, is reported as having died of wounds. Twenty-one years of age, he was the son of Mr and Mrs John Cameron, Millcraig, Alness. Prior to enlisting he was employed as a ploughman on Delny Farm, and subsequently by Mr John Macrae, contractor, Alness. The remains were brought home and laid to rest in Rosskeen Burying Ground will full military honours.

No photo available

Major Finlay McDonald Urquhart

Date of Paper: 10.12.1943
Surname: Urquhart
Forename(s): Finlay McDonald
Rank: Major
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Formosa, Alness

Major Finlay McDonald Urquhart, Highland Light Infantry, whose death, on active service, was recorded in the Ross-shire Journal of 10th November, 1943, was the elder son of the late Mr and Mrs Finlay Urquhart, Formosa, Alness, and a brother of Mrs J. M. Wilson, Avon Cottage, Briarhill Road, Prestwick, Ayrshire.

A former pupil of Glasgow High School, he took various distinctions, including the Wellpark Gold Medal for Modern Languages and the school championship in gymnastics.

Major Urquhart served throughout the Great War, chiefly in the East. He later served on the staff in India during the Afghan War, afterwards retiring to the Regular Army Reserve of Officers. On returning to civilian life he completed the degrees of MA and LL.B at Glasgow University. He distinguished himself in international law, being later appointed an assistant lecturer in that department.

In connection with his interests in international matters, Major Urquhart had travelled widely from the Far East to the prairies of America. Being of Ross-shire extraction, he took a keen interest in the betterment of the Highlands and was Glasgow secretary of the Highland Development League. His chief interest, however, was in the movement for University residential facilities, which culminated in the opening of Maclay Hall.

A memorial service, conducted by the Rev. T K Campbell, was held in the Glasgow University Chapel on Sunday, 21st November, and attended by the Principal, relations and friends, and members and former members of the Maclay Hall.

Sir Hector Hetherington writes: “The news of Major Finlay Urquhart’s death will be received with the greatest sorrow by hundreds of men who passed through Maclay Hall during the period of his wardenship. He was an original resident in the Hall. He became warden in 1927; and with him began the period of its development. He enlarged, replanned and refurnished it, made the rules of its life, or persuaded the members to make the rules he wanted, brought it almost from bankruptcy to a state of reasonable financial stability, and presided himself over every detail of its working. He had his own methods, which nobody but himself fully understood. But he had the confidence and affection of his men, and he had great success.

“The secret was simple – his complete devotion and unselfishness. He refused, absolutely, to accept remuneration for all the endless work he did. This was his contribution to the Hall, to the place he loved and cared for above everything else in life.

“He rejoined his regiment at the outbreak of war, and after a time went to the Middle East. Even from that distance he kept in weekly touch with the Hall. A generation of men has passed through the Hall who never even saw him. But he was, and is, a living personality to them; and none of those who were with him will ever forget his service.”

Please submit your comment

Do you have any more information about any of the content on this page.

Your comments are always welcome: