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Photo: #5768

McCredie R, Pte, Alness

Private R. McCredie

Date of Paper: 05.10.1917
Surname: McCredie
Forename: R.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Deer Park, Alness

Above we reproduce the portraits of two Alness brothers, both of whom have recently been wounded in action.

Signaller Thomas McCredie, Seaforths, is wounded by gunshot in the legs, but it is pleasing to know that he is making satisfactory progress towards recovery. Signaller McCredie, who is 20 years of age, is a grandson of Mr and Mrs Roderick Maclennan, Deer Park, Alness, and was educated at the Alness Public School. Subsequently he went to Glasgow, where he was employed in a wine merchantís business. He joined the Seaforths about a year ago, and has seen considerable service in France.

Private R. McCredie, Seaforths, his brother, was wounded on 8th September, and has been admitted to No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station. Prior to enlisting Pte. McCredie was employed at the Gardens, Ardross.

See entry below for details of his brother Thomas McCredie

Photo: #5784

McCredie Thomas, Signaller, Alness

Signaller Thomas McCredie

Date of Paper: 05.10.1917
Surname: McCredie
Forename: Thomas
Rank: Signaller
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Deer Park, Alness

Above we reproduce the portraits of two Alness brothers, both of whom have recently been wounded in action.

Signaller Thomas McCredie, Seaforths, is wounded by gunshot in the legs, but it is pleasing to know that he is making satisfactory progress towards recovery. Signaller McCredie, who is 20 years of age, is a grandson of Mr and Mrs Roderick Maclennan, Deer Park, Alness, and was educated at the Alness Public School. Subsequently he went to Glasgow, where he was employed in a wine merchantís business. He joined the Seaforths about a year ago, and has seen considerable service in France.

Private R. McCredie, Seaforths, his brother, was wounded on 8th September, and has been admitted to No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station. Prior to enlisting Pte. McCredie was employed at the Gardens, Ardross.

See entry above for details of his brother R. McCredie

Photo: #5765

Munro M, Pte, Alness

Private M. Munro

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): M.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

Munro, Private M., 1607, son of the late Mr Hugh Munro, butcher, Alness, and brother of Mrs Hugh Cameron, Drill Hall House, Munlochy, was forester at Rosehaugh at mobilisation, and went to France with the battalion. A pleasant, agreeable, spirited young man, he was a favourite with everybody.

Photo: #5724

Munro Simon, Corp, Alness

Corporal Simon Munro

Date of Paper: 03.11.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): Simon
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Grenadier Guards
Home Address: Harrogate (formerly Blackmuir, Alness)

ALNESS GRENADIER KILLED

Corporal Simon Munro, killed in action about 22nd September, enlisted in the Grenadier Guards in November 1914, and has been in several engagements. He was with a party of eight doing some special work when a shell burst, and six of the party were killed, Corpl. Munro being one.
The deceased soldier was a native of Blackmuir, Alness, Ross-shire, and at one time was a member of the Ross and Cromarty Constabulary, being stationed at Invergordon and Tain.

In April 1909 he left Ross-shire and joined the West Riding of Yorkshire Constabulary, and was stationed at Wath-on-Dearne, Rotherham. Three years ago he was sent to Harrogate for six months for summer duty.

He was a typical Highlander, and gained the esteem of his fellow constables and civilian friends. On the outbreak of the war he resigned his position in the police force and joined the Grenadier Guards, and had been at the front since August 1915.

A portrait of Corporal Simon Munro appears in these columns.

Photo: #5772

Munro William, Pte, Alness

Private William Munro

Date of Paper: 08.06.1917
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Post Cottage, Coulhill, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

Mrs Bella Munro, Post Cottage, Coulhill, Alness, has just received intimation from the War Office that her son, Private Wm. Munro, 4th Seaforths, attached to a regular battalion, has been missing since the engagement on 11th April. Before the war he was with the forester in Novar, and also in the gardens at Teaninich.

Any information will be thankfully received by Miss B. Munro, Coulhill, Alness.

A photograph appears today.

Photo: #5767

Robertson Peter, Pte, Alness

Private Peter Robertson

Date of Paper: 02.11.1917
Surname: Robertson
First Name(s): Peter
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Gildermorie, Alness

[Obliterated] reached Alness that Pte. Peter Robertson, Seaforths, has fallen in action. Deceased was a native of Perthshire. Before joining up he (along with his wife) was caretaker at Gildermorie for Mr C. W. Dyson Perrins of Ardross. Mr and Mrs Robertson came North from Edinburgh, where her husband was butler at the Conservative Club. Joining up two years ago, he had been in France for about 18 months. Much sympathy is felt with the young widow in her sore bereavement. A photograph of deceased appears in today’s paper.

Lt. Murray, Seaforths, writing from the War Hospital, Reading, to the widow, says: “I have just heard of your great sorrow in the loss of your dear husband. While I was out in France he was my batman, and it pains me to write these lines to his dear ones. I know that nothing I can say will lessen your grief, and what I do know of his faithfulness and sincerity would only make your sorrow more deeply felt. As a soldier, man, and friend, he was loved by officers and men alike, and I know all those that are left of them sympathise with you in your sad bereavement.”

In a letter to Mrs Robertson, Lieut. Angus Macrae says: “I am writing in the name of all your husband’s friends here to tell you how much we feel for you in your very sad loss. Your husband was a very great favourite here, his quiet and unassuming manner making him loved by everyone. To me his death has come as a great personal grief, for he had acted as my servant for two months, and in that time I had come to know him not only as the most untiring and attentive of servants, but also as a true and faithful friend. He was beside me when we moved forward to the attack, and soon afterwards (about 6 a.m.) he was shot through the head. He died instantaneously, suffering no pain, and was buried on the battlefield. The suffering is not his but yours, and our thoughts go out to you in your trouble and grief. I hope it will give you some comfort to feel that he has laid down a noble life for a great cause, that he lived and died bravely and cheerfully, and passed away peacefully at the end.”

Photo: #5722

Ross Cameron, Corp, Alness

Corporal Cameron Ross

Date of Paper: 22.12.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Cameron
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: Seaforth Cottage, Alness

TWO ALNESS SOLDIERS

We reproduce to-day photographs of two sons of Mr John Ross, Seaforth Cottage, Alness, both of whom have been on active service. Lieut. Robert Ross, Gordons, was wounded on 13th November, and a recent message states that he is going on very favourably everything considered. Lt. Ross was pretty severely wounded in the right arm, which was fractured, the elbow being rather badly damaged. After being wounded, Lt. Ross lay six hours in a shell hole before being taken to the rear. A former pupil of Bridgend School, Alness, he was a distinguished student of Dingwall Academy, and an equally distinguished graduate of Edinburgh University. He went to the front early in 1915, and has been through some very rough work. “An Officer’s Diary,” which appeared in these columns, was one of the most interesting war documents yet given to the public.

More recently Lt. Ross, writing courageously with his left hand, confesses to the best of general health. Of four university and school friends, held together by a common bond, Robert Ross alone remains; the others, Lt Anderson, Stornoway; Lt. Raymond Alastair Maclean, Seaforths, Brighton; and L./Corpl. Edward Watt, Seaforths, Dingwall, have each fallen in Great War.

The other day Lt. Ross’s father received from Major Milne, Gordons, his son’s pocket Bible, which had been picked up in the field where he had been lying wounded. This Bible is pierced right through by a bullet, and if it had been carried as is likely, in the breast pocket, the bullet must been deflected, thus saving his life.

Lt. Ross’s younger brother, Corporal Cameron Ross, and had been in the trenches for eleven months when he was invalided home. He saw some of the heavier fighting in the early battle, of the war, when men and guns were less plentiful. Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge were two of the principal battles in which he took part, coming through without a scratch. Eventually he was the victim of shell shock, from the effects of which he is making promise of a good recovery. Meantime he is serving with the reserve battalion, somewhere in England.

See entry below for details of his brother Robert Ross

Photo: #5741

Ross Robert, Lieut, Alness

Lieutenant Robert Ross

Date of Paper: 22.12.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: Seaforth Cottage, Alness

TWO ALNESS SOLDIERS

We reproduce to-day photographs of two sons of Mr John Ross, Seaforth Cottage, Alness, both of whom have been on active service. Lieut. Robert Ross, Gordons, was wounded on 13th November, and a recent message states that he is going on very favourably everything considered. Lt. Ross was pretty severely wounded in the right arm, which was fractured, the elbow being rather badly damaged. After being wounded, Lt. Ross lay six hours in a shell hole before being taken to the rear. A former pupil of Bridgend School, Alness, he was a distinguished student of Dingwall Academy, and an equally distinguished graduate of Edinburgh University. He went to the front early in 1915, and has been through some very rough work. “An Officer’s Diary,” which appeared in these columns, was one of the most interesting war documents yet given to the public.

More recently Lt. Ross, writing courageously with his left hand, confesses to the best of general health. Of four university and school friends, held together by a common bond, Robert Ross alone remains; the others, Lt Anderson, Stornoway; Lt. Raymond Alastair Maclean, Seaforths, Brighton; and L./Corpl. Edward Watt, Seaforths, Dingwall, have each fallen in Great War.

The other day Lt. Ross’s father received from Major Milne, Gordons, his son’s pocket Bible, which had been picked up in the field where he had been lying wounded. This Bible is pierced right through by a bullet, and if it had been carried as is likely, in the breast pocket, the bullet must been deflected, thus saving his life.

Lt. Ross’s younger brother, Corporal Cameron Ross, and had been in the trenches for eleven months when he was invalided home. He saw some of the heavier fighting in the early battle, of the war, when men and guns were less plentiful. Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge were two of the principal battles in which he took part, coming through without a scratch. Eventually he was the victim of shell shock, from the effects of which he is making promise of a good recovery. Meantime he is serving with the reserve battalion, somewhere in England.

See entry above for details of his brother Cameron Ross

Photo: #5755

Ross George, Pte, Alness

Private George Ross

Date of Paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): George
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Kinloch, Boath, Alness

THE LATE PTE. GEORGE ROSS, SEAFORTHS, BOATH

A photograph is reproduced to-day of Pte. George Ross, Seaforths, who died of wounds in No. 18 General Hospital, France, on 15th May, 1917. Pte. Ross was the sixth son of Mr George Ross, shepherd, and Mrs Ross Kinloch, Boath, Alness, and was 28 years of age. A sister, Mrs W. Fraser, resides at Glaick, Boath. In civil life, Pte. Ross was under keeper to Mr Andrew Carnegie of Skibo, from whose estate he joined up. A splendid type of Highland soldier, a staunch friend, a merry comrade, and a loyal and dutiful son, his death is deeply mourned by all who knew him. His comrades-in-arms will greatly regret that he has “gone West,” and will long remember happy associations with him in the Great Adventure.

Much sympathy is felt with the family.

Photo: #5757

Ross Gilbert D, Pte, Alness

Private Gilbert D. Ross

Date of Paper: 31.05.1918
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Gilbert. D.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

There is reproduced to-day a photograph of S/6182 Pte. Gilbert D. Ross, 7th Seaforths, who was killed in action in France on 12th February, 1917. He was the youngest son of Mr David Ross, retired constable, who resides at Alness. Previous to the outbreak of war, Pte. Ross was originally a member of H. Coy. 4th Seaforths, having been a territorial since 1911. He was for several years in the employment of Major Stirling of Strathgarve, as house servant and chauffeur. Mobilising with the 4th Seaforths in [obliterated] he was sent to Bedford, and in 1915 was transferred to the 7th Seaforths, going to France shortly afterwards, and taking part in much subsequent fighting until the time of his death.

Capt. Dennis W. Reid, Inverness, one of the officers of the battalion, in a letter to the father says: “He was hit on the night of the 12th October and died next day, suffering very little pain, for he was unconscious most of the time .. I was very fond of your boy. Apart from his being one of the ‘old hands’ in the battalion, he was very capable and always cheerful, and undoubtedly one of the most soldierly men I have seen out here. He was well known and popular throughout the battalion and his death is felt by all who remain. One cannot say much to show how we sympathise with the folks at home; but we do feel for them. He died peacefully and has passed away from the trouble and turmoil of it all. Still that will not fill the gap which his passing must leave in your life.

Major Stirling, Seaforths (of Strathgarve), in a letter to the father says: “Mrs Stirling and I are very grieved about the death of Gilbert. Knowing him as a lad since his childhood, we were fond of him, and he was a favourite with everyone at Garve and in his battalion.”

No photo available

Kenneth Ross

Date of Paper: 22.12.1916
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 50th Queen’s Battery
Home Address: Vancouver (formerly Rhicullen, Alness)

Photo: #5746

Smith Alick, Pte, Alness

Private Alick Smith

Date of paper: 15.06.1917 and 24.05.1918
Surname: Smith
First Name(s): Alick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

AN ALNESS MILITARY MEDALIST AND HIS BROTHERS

There is reproduced to-day portraits of the three soldier sons of Mr D. Smith, vanman to Mr Alex Ross, baker, Alness, one of whom has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte. James Smith has been with the motor transport for two years, and before joining up was employed as a motor driver at Mr Taylor’s Garage, Invergordon.

Lance-Corpl. Wm Smith, M.M., is one of the signal section of the Ross-shire Seaforths. He took part in the battle of Arras, and has been decorated on the field by his commanding officer for gallantry. L.-Cpl. Smith has been with the Ross-shires in France since November, 1914, and has shared in its heavy fighting, coming through scathless except for a wound in the arm received on May 11, from which he has recovered, and has rejoined his unit.

Pte Alick Smith, Camerons, is a baker to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr Alex. Ross, Alness. He is at present in a Scottish camp.

These three gallant lads are nephews of Detective-Sergt. Henderson, Dingwall.

Date of paper: 24.05.1918

 Official intimation has now been received by Mr D. Smith, vanman, Alness, that his son, Pte. A. Smith, Seaforths, has been killed in France by a sniper in front line. Deceased, who was only 19 years of age, served his apprenticeship with Mr A. Ross, baker, Alness. Mr Smith has other two sons who have served in France since the beginning of the war: James, in the Mechanical Transport, and Willie, who has been through all the fierce fighting with the 4th Seaforths since 1914. He has come through all without a scratch, and won the Military Medal at Vimy Ridge on 9th April, 1917. He was only 17 years of age when called up with the Territorials. Pte. A. Smith served with the Sutherlandshire battalion in France, but trained with the reserve unit of his own county. He was a fine soldier lad, whose death is deeply regretted. A photograph of deceased appears today.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #7149

Smith J, Alness

Private James Smith

Date of paper: 15.06.1917
Surname: Smith
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Motor Transport
Home Address: Alness

AN ALNESS MILITARY MEDALIST AND HIS BROTHERS

There is reproduced to-day portraits of the three soldier sons of Mr D. Smith, vanman to Mr Alex Ross, baker, Alness, one of whom has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte. James Smith has been with the motor transport for two years, and before joining up was employed as a motor driver at Mr Taylor’s Garage, Invergordon.

Lance-Corpl. Wm Smith, M.M., is one of the signal section of the Ross-shire Seaforths. He took part in the battle of Arras, and has been decorated on the field by his commanding officer for gallantry. L.-Cpl. Smith has been with the Ross-shires in France since November, 1914, and has shared in its heavy fighting, coming through scathless except for a wound in the arm received on May 11, from which he has recovered, and has rejoined his unit.

Pte Alick Smith, Camerons, is a baker to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr Alex. Ross, Alness. He is at present in a Scottish camp.

These three gallant lads are nephews of Detective-Sergt. Henderson, Dingwall.

Date of paper: 24.05.1918

 Official intimation has now been received by Mr D. Smith, vanman, Alness, that his son, Pte. A. Smith, Seaforths, has been killed in France by a sniper in front line. Deceased, who was only 19 years of age, served his apprenticeship with Mr A. Ross, baker, Alness. Mr Smith has other two sons who have served in France since the beginning of the war: James, in the Mechanical Transport, and Willie, who has been through all the fierce fighting with the 4th Seaforths since 1914. He has come through all without a scratch, and won the Military Medal at Vimy Ridge on 9th April, 1917. He was only 17 years of age when called up with the Territorials. Pte. A. Smith served with the Sutherlandshire battalion in France, but trained with the reserve unit of his own county. He was a fine soldier lad, whose death is deeply regretted. A photograph of deceased appears today.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5739

Smith William, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal William Smith

Date of paper: 15.06.1917 and 24.05.1918
Surname: Smith
First Name(s): William
Rank: Lance-Corpl.
Regiment: Signal section / Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

AN ALNESS MILITARY MEDALIST AND HIS BROTHERS

There is reproduced to-day portraits of the three soldier sons of Mr D. Smith, vanman to Mr Alex Ross, baker, Alness, one of whom has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte. James Smith has been with the motor transport for two years, and before joining up was employed as a motor driver at Mr Taylor’s Garage, Invergordon.

Lance-Corpl. Wm Smith, M.M., is one of the signal section of the Ross-shire Seaforths. He took part in the battle of Arras, and has been decorated on the field by his commanding officer for gallantry. L.-Cpl. Smith has been with the Ross-shires in France since November, 1914, and has shared in its heavy fighting, coming through scathless except for a wound in the arm received on May 11, from which he has recovered, and has rejoined his unit.

Pte Alick Smith, Camerons, is a baker to trade, and served his apprenticeship with Mr Alex. Ross, Alness. He is at present in a Scottish camp.

These three gallant lads are nephews of Detective-Sergt. Henderson, Dingwall.

Date of paper: 24.05.1918

 Official intimation has now been received by Mr D. Smith, vanman, Alness, that his son, Pte. A. Smith, Seaforths, has been killed in France by a sniper in front line. Deceased, who was only 19 years of age, served his apprenticeship with Mr A. Ross, baker, Alness. Mr Smith has other two sons who have served in France since the beginning of the war: James, in the Mechanical Transport, and Willie, who has been through all the fierce fighting with the 4th Seaforths since 1914. He has come through all without a scratch, and won the Military Medal at Vimy Ridge on 9th April, 1917. He was only 17 years of age when called up with the Territorials. Pte. A. Smith served with the Sutherlandshire battalion in France, but trained with the reserve unit of his own county. He was a fine soldier lad, whose death is deeply regretted. A photograph of deceased appears today.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5877

Smith William C C, Corp, Balblair

Corporal William C. C. Smith

Date of paper: 28.07.1916
Surname: Smith
First Name(s): William C. C.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

CORPL. WM. C. C. SMITH, SEAFORTHS

We reproduce to-day a photograph of 9856, Corporal Wm. C. C. Smith, Seaforths, who was killed in the recent advance where his battalion distinguished itself. A notice of Corpl. Smith’s death appeared in last week’s Journal. Deceased served with the Seaforths in India and returned home time-expired four years ago, passing into the reserve. He became postman at Boath, Alness, and, subsequently until war broke out and he was recalled to the colours, he was postman at Balblair. A native of the Edinburgh district, 32 years of age, he married in December, 1913, Miss Christina H. Ross, Evanton, by whom he is survived.

Deceased saw a lot of fighting on the Western front. His battalion took part in the stubborn fighting back from Moms to the Marne, and shared subsequently in the advance. Later he fought in other sectors, and was wounded, returning to duty after a brief visit home about the end of the year.
In private life he was held in high esteem for his rare urbanity, obliging disposition and uprightness. Deceased was a freemason, and a member of Robertson’s Lodge, Cromarty. Much sympathy is felt with his widow in her loss.

Photo: #5754

Williamson David, Pte, Alness

Private David Williamson

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Williamson
First Name(s): David
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Hay Burn Cottage, Alness

THE LATE PRIVATE D. WILLIAMSON, ALNESS

Private David Williamson, Seaforths, killed in action on 9th April, was the youngest son of Mr John Williamson, Hay Burn cottage, Alness. He was 20 years of age, and was a carpenter at Dalmore before war broke out. A promising young lad, much sympathy is felt for his parents, sisters, and brothers. The officer commanding his company has written to his father and mother as follows: “At the time of his death he was engaged in an assault on the German second line, which we won, I am glad to say. It will be a great relief to know that he met his death practically painlessly. He was a good soldier, and was always cheery and willing for any task which came his way. He will be sadly missed by all his comrades.” A portrait of Private Williamson appears to-day.

Photo: #5778

Williamson Donald, Sgt, Alness

Sergeant Donald Williamson

Date of Paper: 04.05.1917
Surname: Williamson
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

THE LATE SGT. DONALD WILLIAMSON, ALNESS

Sergt. Donald Williamson, Seaforths, reported killed in action , was the second son of Mr Williamson, surfaceman, Alness. Before the war he was a forester at Novar, and deservedly popular with all who knew him. As a Territorial he mobilised in August, 1914, and ever since has been with the regiment. Last year he rose to sergeant. He died leading his men in the terrible battle of the 9th April. Much sympathy is felt for his sorrowing parents and sisters. His eldest brother is with the Canadians. Here is an extract of a letter his parents received from Captain Hamilton Harris: “It is my painful duty as company commander to acquaint you with the very sad news of the death of your son whilst in action on the morning of the 9th inst. At the time he met his death he was in charge of his platoon, and he gained the German second line, which was his objective. He had led his men well, and we have lost in him a splendid and dashing N.C.O. He could always be relied on to do any job excellently, and in tight corners was absolutely fearless. His loss will be hard to replace in my company. The officers, n.c.o.’s, and men of the company ask you to accept their deep sympathy in this sad hour, and pray that God in His great mercy and tenderness will be very near you in your bereavement.”

A portrait of Sergt. Donald Williamson appears to-day.

Photo: #5756

Williamson George, Pte, Alness

Private George Williamson

Date of Paper: 10.05.1918
Surname: Williamson
First Name(s): George
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: West End, Alness

Pte. George Williamson, Seaforths (Pioneers), youngest son of Mr Peter Williamson. West End, Alness, who was wounded on the 15th ult., died at No. 4 General Hospital, France, on the 18th ult., at the age of 20 years. Pte. Williamson was slightly wounded about two years ago, and was home on furlough only a fortnight prior to his death. Previous to enlisting he was a farm servant. A brother of Pte. Williamson was killed on 12th October, 1917. Deceased was a smart soldier, and his death is much regretted. His parents, twice bereaved, have the sympathy of all.

Photo: #5759

Williamson Isaac, Pte, Alness

Private Isaac Williamson

Date of Paper: 16.11.1917
Surname: Williamson
First Name(s): Isaac
Rank: Private
Regiment: Camerons
Home Address: Brae Cottage, Alness.

As briefly reported last week, Pte. Isaac Williamson, Camerons (Lochiel’s), the adopted son of Mr and Mrs Cameron, Brae Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Forres, was killed in action on the Western Front on 12th October, 1917. Deceased, who was 27 years of age, was a fine soldierly fellow; good hearted and popular. Deepest sympathy goes out to Mr and Mrs Cameron and family.

[Handwritten note: “See brother killed 10.5.18”]

Photo: #5720

Wilson Alexander, Alness

Alexander Wilson

Date of Paper: 19.10.1917 and 21.06.1918
Surname: Wilson
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: School Road, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

202435 Pte. William Wilson, Seaforths, missing since March 21, is a son of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness. His wife resides at Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness. A photograph appears to-day. There are still a considerable number of men missing since the first days of the German offensive who have been unable to send home word of their whereabouts, and there is a strong hope that Pte. Wilson is among the number. Pte. Wilson was born in Dingwall, but had been resident in Alness for 14 years. He is 26 years of age. He was trained at Ripon camp. Any information will be gratefully received by his relatives.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Five sons of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness, Ross-shire, are serving with the Colours and photographs of these gallant men and their parents appear in to-day’s Journal. Four sons are with the Seaforths, one is serving with the Dragoon Guards. All five sons were born in Dingwall, but for fourteen years the family has resided in Alness.

John Wilson, Seaforths, the eldest son is serving in India.
Tom Wilson, Seaforths, is in France.
William Wilson, Seaforths, is serving in France.
Alexander Wilson, Seaforths, is meantime stationed in the North.
Trooper Robert Wilson, Dragoon Guards, who has been home on leave, is serving in France.

See entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5730

Wilson John, Alness

John Wilson

Date of Paper: 19.10.1917
Surname: Wilson
First Name(s): John
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: School Road, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

202435 Pte. William Wilson, Seaforths, missing since March 21, is a son of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness. His wife resides at Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness. A photograph appears to-day. There are still a considerable number of men missing since the first days of the German offensive who have been unable to send home word of their whereabouts, and there is a strong hope that Pte. Wilson is among the number. Pte. Wilson was born in Dingwall, but had been resident in Alness for 14 years. He is 26 years of age. He was trained at Ripon camp. Any information will be gratefully received by his relatives.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Five sons of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness, Ross-shire, are serving with the Colours and photographs of these gallant men and their parents appear in to-day’s Journal. Four sons are with the Seaforths, one is serving with the Dragoon Guards. All five sons were born in Dingwall, but for fourteen years the family has resided in Alness.

John Wilson, Seaforths, the eldest son is serving in India.
Tom Wilson, Seaforths, is in France.
William Wilson, Seaforths, is serving in France.
Alexander Wilson, Seaforths, is meantime stationed in the North.
Trooper Robert Wilson, Dragoon Guards, who has been home on leave, is serving in France.

See entry above and entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5787

Wilson Robert, Trooper, Alness

Trooper Robert Wilson

Date of Paper: 19.10.1917
Surname: Wilson
First Name(s): Robert
Rank: Trooper
Regiment: Dragoon Guards
Home Address: School Road, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

202435 Pte. William Wilson, Seaforths, missing since March 21, is a son of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness. His wife resides at Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness. A photograph appears to-day. There are still a considerable number of men missing since the first days of the German offensive who have been unable to send home word of their whereabouts, and there is a strong hope that Pte. Wilson is among the number. Pte. Wilson was born in Dingwall, but had been resident in Alness for 14 years. He is 26 years of age. He was trained at Ripon camp. Any information will be gratefully received by his relatives.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Five sons of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness, Ross-shire, are serving with the Colours and photographs of these gallant men and their parents appear in to-day’s Journal. Four sons are with the Seaforths, one is serving with the Dragoon Guards. All five sons were born in Dingwall, but for fourteen years the family has resided in Alness.

John Wilson, Seaforths, the eldest son is serving in India.
Tom Wilson, Seaforths, is in France.
William Wilson, Seaforths, is serving in France.
Alexander Wilson, Seaforths, is meantime stationed in the North.
Trooper Robert Wilson, Dragoon Guards, who has been home on leave, is serving in France.

See two entries above and two entries below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5785

Wilson Thomas, Alness

Thomas Wilson

Date of Paper: 19.10.1917
Surname: Wilson
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: School Road, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

202435 Pte. William Wilson, Seaforths, missing since March 21, is a son of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness. His wife resides at Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness. A photograph appears to-day. There are still a considerable number of men missing since the first days of the German offensive who have been unable to send home word of their whereabouts, and there is a strong hope that Pte. Wilson is among the number. Pte. Wilson was born in Dingwall, but had been resident in Alness for 14 years. He is 26 years of age. He was trained at Ripon camp. Any information will be gratefully received by his relatives.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Five sons of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness, Ross-shire, are serving with the Colours and photographs of these gallant men and their parents appear in to-day’s Journal. Four sons are with the Seaforths, one is serving with the Dragoon Guards. All five sons were born in Dingwall, but for fourteen years the family has resided in Alness.

John Wilson, Seaforths, the eldest son is serving in India.
Tom Wilson, Seaforths, is in France.
William Wilson, Seaforths, is serving in France.
Alexander Wilson, Seaforths, is meantime stationed in the North.
Trooper Robert Wilson, Dragoon Guards, who has been home on leave, is serving in France.

See three entries above and one entry below for details of his four brothers

Photo: #5773

Wilson William, Pte, Alness

Private William Wilson

Date of Paper: 19.10.1917
Surname: Wilson
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness (formerly School Road, Alness)

ALNESS SEAFORTH MISSING

202435 Pte. William Wilson, Seaforths, missing since March 21, is a son of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness. His wife resides at Ivy Cottage, Coulhill, Alness. A photograph appears to-day. There are still a considerable number of men missing since the first days of the German offensive who have been unable to send home word of their whereabouts, and there is a strong hope that Pte. Wilson is among the number. Pte. Wilson was born in Dingwall, but had been resident in Alness for 14 years. He is 26 years of age. He was trained at Ripon camp. Any information will be gratefully received by his relatives.

Date of Paper: 21.06.1918

Five sons of Mr and Mrs Wilson, School Road, Alness, Ross-shire, are serving with the Colours and photographs of these gallant men and their parents appear in to-day’s Journal. Four sons are with the Seaforths, one is serving with the Dragoon Guards. All five sons were born in Dingwall, but for fourteen years the family has resided in Alness.

John Wilson, Seaforths, the eldest son is serving in India.
Tom Wilson, Seaforths, is in France.
William Wilson, Seaforths, is serving in France.
Alexander Wilson, Seaforths, is meantime stationed in the North.
Trooper Robert Wilson, Dragoon Guards, who has been home on leave, is serving in France.

See entries above for details of his four brothers