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Photo: #5747

Macdonald Angus, Pte, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Angus
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.

Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 5 entries below for details of his brothers

Photo: #5777

Macdonald Donald, Sgt, Alness

Sergeant Donald Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 3rd American Infantry
Home Address: Iowa, USA, ex Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.

Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 4 entries below and 1 above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5781

Macdonald Hugh, Sgt, Alness

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Guards Division, Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address: Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.

Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 3 entries below and 2 above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5723

Macdonald James, Corp, Alness

Corporal James Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): James
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths / Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry
Home Address: Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.

Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 2 entries below and 3 above for details of his brothers

No photo available

Richard Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s) Richard
Rank: Not stated
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Albert Cottage Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness

Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.

Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.

Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 1 entry below and 4 entries above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5729

Macdonald William, Gunner, Alness

Gunner William Macdonald

Date of Paper: 01.02.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s); William
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Engineers / Tank Corps
Home Address: Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.

Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall’s Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.

Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: “I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him.” Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: “It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son’s death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier’s death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join.” Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness
Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.
Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.

Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.

Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.

The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.
Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

See 5 entries above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5783

Macgillivray William T,  Sgt, Elgin ex Alness

Sergeant William T. MacGillivray

Date of Paper: 21.10.1917
Surname: Macgillivray
First Name(s): William T.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Royal Gun Artillery
Home Address: Elgin (formerly Alness)

Sergt. William T. MacGillivray, R.G.A., has died of wounds received in action, surviving but a few hours the effects of a German shell. A native of Alness, where he was born 32(?) years ago, for many years he was water bailiff with Sir Kenneth Mackenzie of Gairloch, and resided at Poolewe, where he was well known. Leaving Poolewe he went to Glasgow as an Inspector of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, transferring later on to Elgin, where he had been for seven years, and where his widow resides. Sergt. MacGillivray joined up about two years ago, and had been in France since June last. He was held in high esteem in his battery. In a letter, his Major says he was one of the finest and noblest characters in the battery, and that by his splendid example and clean life he had won the admiration of all who knew him. His last words were: “Remember me to all at home, and good luck to the Twentieth.”

Two brothers – Lieutenant John MacGillivray and Corporal Angus MacGillivray – have been killed in action, and the father, who was well known in the Muir of Ord district, died in Canada only a month ago.

The deepest sympathy goes out to his widowed mother, who is a sister of the Rev. Alex. Stuart, Fountainbridge Free Church, Edinburgh, to his young widow and only son, and to his five sisters and only surviving brother, Mr Duncan MacGillivray, in New Zealand.

Photo: #5733

Mackenzie Duncan, L Corp, Inverness ex Alness

Sergeant George Mackay

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Mackay
First Name(s): George
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Not stated.
Home Address: 53, High Street, Alness

Mackay Sergt. George, 1055, 20 years of age was the son of Mr and Mrs Robert Mackay, 53 High Street, Alness. An apprentice carpenter in Tain, he was called up on mobilisation went to France with the battalion, and, like most of the others went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle. He was popular with all. His brother Corpl. Wm. Mackay is serving with the R.E. on the Western front. “I cannot speak too highly of your son’s character and ability,” wrote Sergt. Mackay’s platoon officer.

Photo: #5751

Mackenzie D K, Pte, Alness

Private D. K. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 21.07.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): D. K.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Fyrish Cottage, Alness

ALNESS CANADIAN WOUNDED

Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Fyrish Cottage, Alness, have been notified by the Canadian Record Office that their son, Pte. D. K. Mackenzie, has been slightly wounded with shrapnel, and is at present making an excellent recovery in a French convalescent camp. Pte. Mackenzie was well known in Dingwall, from which he emigrated to Canada some years ago. On the outbreak of war, like many an old Ross-shire boy, he exchanged a lucrative appointment for the old flag. After roughing it for some months at a Canadian training camp, he crossed to England, where, on the completion of his training he left for Flanders, where, after six months trench experience, he was wounded, as stated, during the recent storming of the enemy trenches at Ypres.

Pte. Mackenzie was well known in Dingwall business and athletic circles, where he was a well-known member of the old Harrier Club. A speedy return to health will be the wish of his many Ross-shire friends. A photograph of Pte Mackenzie appears above.

Date of Paper: 02.02.1917

THE LATE PTE. D. K. MACKENZIE, ALNESS

The late Pte. D. K. Mackenzie, Alness, previously reported missing, now believed killed in action, and whose portrait appears above, is a son of Mr and Mrs Mackenzie, Fyrish Cottage, Alness. Born 28 years ago, Pte. Mackenzie was well-known in Dingwall business circles, from whence he emigrated to Canada about five years ago. The outbreak of hostilities found him in an important appointment in Winnipeg, which, in common with most of the other young members of the Ross-shire community there, he exchanged early in 1915 for the Canadian infantry. The succeeding summer and autumn was spent in a Canadian training camp, from whence he crossed to England, and on the completion of his training there, he went with his regiment to Flanders, where for the next few months he participated in the desperate fighting in the Ypres salient, which cumulated later in the taking of the German defences in the neighbourhood of St. Eloi, where Pte. Mackenzie was slightly wounded by shrapnel. The succeeding months were spent in a French convalescent camp at Boulogne, and feeling fit again he volunteered for service with his battalion, which had now been transferred to the Somme. On September 26th Pte. Mackenzie was posted as “missing”.

Photo: #5779

Mackenzie Duncan, Sgt, Alness

Sergeant Duncan Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 28.09.1917
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Oakbank Cottage, Alness

Above will be found a reproduction of the photograph of Sergeant Duncan Mackenzie, Seaforths, killed in action in France on August 1st. Enlisting in August 1914, he went out to France in November with the county territorial battalion. He was the only son of Mr Adam Mackenzie, late of Oakbank Cottage, Alness. Only 23 years of age, he was always a bright and cheery soldier.

In a letter to Miss C. Mackenzie, Sergeant Mackenzie’s youngest sister, his officer writes: “It is with a feeling a deepest sympathy that I write to inform you of the death in action on August 1st of your brother, Sergeant Duncan Mackenzie. We had been lying in support on the 31st, and we were called upon on the afternoon of the 1st to relieve the front line, and it was just after we had arrived at the advanced post which was our destination that a heavy shell landed in the trench in which your brother was sheltering and wounded him so severely that he must have died at once. His body was carried back the next day to headquarters and buried there, a small cross being put over his grave. Its exact position I will notify to you later. It was a very great shock indeed to me when I heard your brother had been hit, and the news cast a gloom over the whole platoon, for he was a universal favourite. He was indeed a most valuable man to have in the platoon. His wit was wonderful no matter what the circumstances were; even if everyone else were ‘fed up’ to the eyes and utterly miserable, he was never done with his cheery nonsense, and he would soon bring back a laugh to us. I’ve known your brother since the old Bedford days, and have also spent eighteen months out here with him in the same platoon, and we never knew him otherwise than cheery and bright, never downhearted or miserable, and always ready for anything that might happen. I was glad too when he came out the last time to get him to be my platoon sergeant. I am sorry to lose him, for I shall never see anyone to equal him or be quite the same to me. What his loss will mean to you we can only vaguely guess, but I am sure the whole company will join with me in hoping that you will get some comfort from the fact that he died where he would wish to have died, in the very front line just at the time when we had the old Huns nicely beaten.”

Photo: #5719

Mackenzie George A, 2nd Lieut, Alness

Second Lieutenant George Arthur Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 14.01.1916
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): George Arthur
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: 8th Battalion Gordon Highlanders
Home Address: Alness

THE LATE LIEUT. G. A. MACKENZIE, ALNESS

George Arthur Mackenzie, Second Lieut. 8th Battalion Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr and Mrs G. G. Mackenzie, Alness, was killed in action near the village of Haisnes, France, on the 25th September, 1915, in his 24th year.

Educated at Bridgend Public School (Alness), Tain Royal Academy, and at Fettes College (1904-1908), he subsequently studied at Edinburgh University where, in 1912, he graduated with Honours (Classics), and thereafter took classes in medicine. Before the outbreak of war he had spent a year on the Continent studying methods of physical education with the intention of incorporating this experience in his medical career, and on his return to this country he acted temporarily (in the absence of Captain Cheales) as Lecturer on Physical Training in the Edinburgh Provincial Training College. He relinquished this work in order to serve his country, and, obtaining a commission in the 8th (Service) Battalion Gordon Highlanders, he went to France with his regiment early in May.
He was well-known in University circles, and had been a member of the O.T.C. for several years, and also of the Wanderers’ Rugby Football Club.

The adjutant of the battalion, writing of Lieutenant Mackenzie’s part in the memorable advance, says: “In the terrible fighting which commenced on the 25th of September, your very gallant son rendered magnificent services to our very hard pressed company near the village of Haisnes. Even after he had been wounded his wonderful conduct greatly inspired our men to fight for hours against awful odds, which, in spite of all our efforts, compelled us to retire. He and his magnificent conduct will ever be remembered by the few of us of ‘C’ Coy. still remaining.”

Photo: #5726

Maclaren Alistair J, Gunner, Alness

Gunner Signaller Alistair J. Maclaren

Date of Paper 15.03.1918 and 26.09.1919
Surname: Maclaren
First Name(s): Alistair J.
Rank: Gunner Signaller
Regiment: Royal Field Artillery
Home Address: Schoolhouse, Alness

2445 Gnr. Alistair J. Maclaren R.F.A., son of Mr Maclaren, M.A., Schoolhouse, Alness, whose photograph is reproduced to-day, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in action. Unfortunately since he was awarded the Medal he has suffered shell-shock and is in Dykebar Hospital, Paisley. Fortunately recent letters show that he is making a good recovery. Gnr Maclarenn joined the R.F.A. in 1916, and after training in England proceeded to France as a signaller. Much respected in Alness, where his boyhood was spent, he is a well remembered pupil of Dingwall Academy where he finished a steadily progressive career in 1915, when he emerged Dux of the school. He entered Edinburgh University after gaining a Menzies Bursary in 1915, and cut short his University studies on reaching Military age the following year. His many friends in Dingwall and Alness, while congratulating him on the distinction he has achieved, and the honour he has brought to the district, will join in the wish that his recovery will be speedy and complete.

Date of Paper 26.09.1919

AN ALNESS MILITARY MEDALLIST

Above we reproduce a photograph of Gunner Signaller A. J. Maclaren, R.F.A., who won the Military Medal for bringing in wounded infantrymen during a bombardment at Devil’s Crossing, Zounebeke on 13th January, 1918. Following this he contracted trench fever, and suffered from gas poisoning and slight shell shock. He was invalided home on 20th February, 1918, and was finally discharged on Armistice Day. Sgr. Maclaren was a student when he enlisted on 10th May, 1916. He is a son of Mr James Maclaren, M.A., headmaster of Alness Public School.

Photo: #5738

Maclennan Roderick, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal Roderick Maclennan

Date of Paper: 04.10.1918
Surname: Maclennan
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Averon Bank, Alness

Mr and Mrs Maclennan, Averon Bank, Alness, as recently reported, have been informed by the War Office that their youngest son, L/Corporal Roderick Maclennan, Seaforths, was killed in action on the 26th of July. At the time of his death he was attached to a machine gun section. L/Corporal Maclennan left Alness in August 1914 with the Territorials and had served continuously in France. He had been wounded four times and was on the HMS Donegal on his way to England after being gassed, when that vessel was torpedoed. Thirty-two years of age, he was well known in Dingwall, having worked for many years with Mr Tolmie, plumber. He took a great interest in football.

Photo: #5766

Macleod Norman, Pte, Alness

Private Norman Macleod

Date of Paper: 02.08.1918
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Norman
Rank: Private
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: Contullich, Alness

STRATHPEFFER SOLDIER'S DEATH

Mrs Norman Macleod, Contullich, Alness, as recently announced, has received the sad news of her husband’s death. Pte. Norman Macleod, Machine Gun Corps, died of wounds received in action in France on May 30th. Pte Macleod joined the colours on July 19th, 1916, and was posted to the Seaforths at Ripon. After three months’ training he was transferred to the MGC. On July 21, 1917, he went to France. He died of wounds on May 30th, 1918, aged 37 years. Before joining up deceased was in the employment of Mr Wallace, Spa Hotel, for 14 years as chauffeur and carpenter. He is survived by a widow and five children, to whom much sympathy is extended. A photograph appears today.

Photo: #5770

Macleod Thomas D, Pte, Alness

Private Thomas D. Macleod

Date of Paper: 26.05.1916
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Thomas D.
Rank: Private
Regiment: G (Alness) Coy. 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Aultnafearn, Strathrusdale, Alness

Above will be found the photograph of 1735(6?) Private Thomas D Macleod, G (Alness) Coy., 1/4th Seaforths, the only son of Mr and Mrs Macleod, Aultnafearn, Strathrusdale, Alness. He was only 18 years of age, and fell at the battle of Aubers Ridge on 9th May, 1915.

Photo: #5721

Matheson Alexander D,  Corp, Alness

Corporal Alexander D. Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): Alexander D.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: New Zealander Mounted Rifles
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 5 entries below for details of his brothers

Photo: #5748

Matheson Angus, Pte, Alness

Private Angus Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): Angus
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealander Mounted Rifles
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 4 entries below and 1 above for details of his brothers

No photo available

Gunner Duncan Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: R.G.A.
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 3 entries below and 2 above for details of his brothers

No photo available

Private James Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 31.05.1918

As briefly stated in a recent issue, Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been informed that her second youngest son, Pte. James Matheson, 4th Seaforths, who has been missing since the battle of Cambrai in November 1917, died a prisoner of war at Rennely in German hands. The information was forwarded through Switzerland by the Geneva Red Cross. Pte. Matheson, whose photograph appears today, was one of six brothers who have taken an active part in the war. He is the second son to fall, an elder brother, Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, having been killed in action on the Western front in October 1917, only a few weeks before his brother was posted missing. Pte. Matheson was 22 years of age. He joined the Seaforths in 1915, and after training at Pitlochry went to Ripon and thence to France in 1916. In April 1917 he was wounded at the Battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he had leave at home, and thereafter reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the Front in August 1917. Deceased was a fine soldierly lad, much loved by all who knew him. There is deep sympathy with the widowed mother whose double loss comes heavy after the long period of anxiety and gradually diminishing hope.

The other sons on service are Corpl. Alick Matheson, New Zealanders, in the East; Pte. Murdo Matheson, HLI, in France; Gnr. Duncan Matheson, RGA, recovering from wounds in England; and Pte. John Matheson, with the American Army.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 2 entries below and 3 above for details of his brothers

No photo availabe

Private John Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: American Army
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 4 entries above and 1 below for details of his brothers

No photo available

Private Murdo Matheson

Date of Paper: 30.11.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Private
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Ballone, Boath, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Pte. Angus Matheson, New Zealanders, fourth son of Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, Ross-shire, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. Pte. Matheson, who was 31 years of age, joined up two years ago, had been in New Zealand for thirteen years, and was sheep buyer for the New Zealand Freezing Company. On crossing with his contingent he got two nights’ leave in the North, but since then had been continuously on service. A fine, manly fellow, and a courageous and brave man, his officers and comrades speak in high terms of him. Lt. Moore, writing to the mother, says: “Dear Mrs Matheson – It is with deep regret that I write you regarding the death in action of your son, 44132 Pte. Angus Matheson, during the offensive of October 12th. Though he was not in my platoon, he was in my charge when he fell, and I want to tell you that he proved himself to be a very gallant soldier. Though he was in action for the first time, he showed the coolness and courage of a veteran. It will be at least a little consolation to you to know the circumstances under which he met his death. During the advance we were held up by machine gun fire from a couple of ‘pill-boxes’ and it was essential that immediate action should be taken. I explained the situation to the men near me, and we set off to cross a dangerous piece of ground swept by machine gun fire, your son being one of the first to follow me. When almost across he was struck in the head by a bullet and killed instantaneously. I may say that I am proud to have had men of his calibre with me, and only regret that he did not come through safely.”

Deep sympathy is felt with Mrs Matheson in her loss. The family record is truly one of which a Highland mother even in her sorrow may well be proud. In all, four sons have served their country in the war.

Corpl. Alick Matheson, 33, joined up at the outbreak of hostilities from New Zealand, and was for two months in the Dardanelles, and is at present with Allenby’s victorious army in the Holy Land. He has come through without a scratch so far. During all that time Cpl. Matheson has not been home on leave.

Pte. Murdo Matheson, 29, HLI, joined up about eighteen mohths ago, and has been on active service in France for a year.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, 25, RGA, mobilised at the outbreak of war, and has been serving continuously on the Western Front until 15th October, when he was wounded in both eyes. He is at present in a base hospital in France, and the latest report is that he is recovering rapidly.
Pte. James Matheson, 22, 4th Seaforths, joined up in November 1914 and proceeded to France in May 1915. He was wounded by gunshot in the thigh in April 1917, but has been back at the Western Front since August.

Date of Paper: 22.08.1919

DEATH OF A ROSS-SHIRE SOLDIER IN NEW ZEALAND

Much regret will be felt at the announcement that Corpl. Alexander D. Matheson, New Zealand Mounted Rifles, son of the late Mr John Matheson, and Mrs Matheson, Ballone, Boath, Alness, has been accidentally killed at Christchurch, New Zealand. Deceased went to New Zealand about 15 years ago, and engaged in farming with his uncle, Mr Malcolm Matheson. In February 1915 he joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles, and came over to Egypt, from where he proceeded to Gallipoli with a draft. He took part in the withdrawal from the peninsula. Later he was attached to the Army which ultimately conquered the Turk in the Palestine campaign. In December last year he came to his home in the Highlands on leave, and remained for over two months. In March he returned to New Zealand pending demobilisation. At Christchurch about the 13th May Mr Malcolm Matheson met his nephew and drove him to his home. About 5 pm the horse got out on the road with his harness on, and Mr Alex. Matheson went after him and caught him. He jumped on the horse’s back, but the horse immediately bolted. Attempting to get the reins with the object of pulling up the horse, Alex. was killed. The accident caused the greatest grief to the relatives, who had been rejoicing at the homecoming of one who had so nobly served his country for over four years. Deceased was a prominent Freemason, and while in the East attended several meetings, one in Palestine, and quite near to [obliterated] Temple.

Mrs Matheson in all had five sons who served in the war. Private Angus Matheson, New Zealand Force, was killed in action on October 12th, 1917, while serving on the Western Front. He had been in New Zealand for 13 years, and was engaged as a sheep buyer. He joined up in 1915, and was 31 years of age when he fell – a courageous and brave soldier.

Private James Matheson, 1/4th Seaforths, was captured at Cambrai on 30th November, 1917, and died as a prisoner in German hands at Rennely. He was employed on Government work in the North, but enlisted in the county regiment in 1915. In April, 1917, he was wounded at the battle of Arras. After three months in hospital he reported at Cromarty, and subsequently returned to the front in August of the same year. Private James was 22 years of age.

Private Murdo Matheson (31) served in the H.L.I. and was on service for over three years. He is at present in France.

Gunner Duncan Matheson, RGA (27), mobilised at the outbreak of war, and saw continuous service on the Western Front until wounded in both legs on 15th September 1917.

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs Matheson in this her triple sacrifice.

Writing to Mrs Matheson from Christchurch, the Rev. R. M. Ryburn says: “It was my sad duty to conduct the funeral of your son, who was killed just a few hours after he had arrived back in New Zealand. After serving his country so long amid the danger of war, and after returning sound and well, it is very pathetic to have been carried off so suddenly. Everyone who has heard the circumstances feels the sadness of this death, and I am sure many hearts go out to you in distant Scotland in your loss. Your son was given a military funeral, and those of his mates present were deeply affected. I can only say may God abundantly comfort you in your bereavement.”
Photographs of the three deceased soldiers appear above.

See 5 entries above for details of his brothers

Photo: #5727

Matheson Duncan, Gunner, Alness

Gunner David G. Matheson

Date of Paper: 05.10.1917
Surname: Matheson
First Name(s): David G
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery
Home Address: Ballachraggan, Alness

To-day we reproduce a photo of Gunner David G. Matheson, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Andrew Matheson, Ballachraggan, Alness, who is at present in a military hospital in England suffering from the effects of German gas. Before war Gunner Matheson held a very responsible position in Canada, but, like all the other patriotic sons of Ross-shire he at once answered the mother country’s call and came forward to do his bit. He enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery, and passed through each course of his training successfully, and proceeded to the field of operations in the month of May, where his only brother, Thomas John Matheson, is doing duty in the transport since over a year. The many friends in Easter Ross wish that Gunner Matheson may soon recover his very serious illness, as his life was despaired of for some time. He was totally blind for a month, and suffered very severely from the gas effects, then he contracted pleurisy and bronchitis, from which he is slowly recovering. All sympathy goes to his father and mother and sisters in their anxiety, and hope for a speedy recovery of their boy, who was highly respected by each one whomever he was associated with