You are welcome to comment on these pictures

Ross and Cromarty Heritage Society welcome further information and comments about any person or photos on our website. Adding a comment means that you accept our Privacy Policy.

Photo: #5750

Bain D A, Pte, Alness

Private D. A. Bain

Date of Paper: 01.06.1917
Surname: Bain
First Name(s): D. A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Clunas Buildings, Alness

ALNESS SEAFORTH SEVERELY WOUNDED

Private D. A. Bain, Seaforths (11466), son of Mrs Mackay, Clunas Buildings Alness, was wounded in the neck, left side and left knee on April 23. Pte Bain is a grandson of the late Mr Hugh Cameron, Davidston, Cromarty. He is at present in Suffolk Hospital. Ipswich

Photo: #5740

Black A W, Lieut, Alness

Lieutenant A. W. Black

Date of Paper: 06.12.1918
Surname: Black
First Name(s): A. W.
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

SEAFORTH OFFICER'S APPOINTMENT:

LIEUT. A. W. BLACK, ALNESS

Subject to his demobilisation, and with the approval of the Board of Agriculture for Scotland, Lt. A. W. Black, Seaforths has taken over the “command” of Craibstone Farm, Aberdeen, under the North of Scotland College of Agriculture, with the duty of supervising the training for agriculture of Discharged Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers. Lt. Black belongs to Ross-shire. He is not a Thurso man, as was stated, a week or two ago. He was born at Alness. His father, still well-remembered, was 27 years stationmaster there, and his grandfather, Mr Duncan Black, is still recalled as schoolmaster at Glenglass and an elder of the Free Church for half-a-century. Lt, Black was educated at Alness and Dingwall. Later he was employed under Colonel Cuthbert in Ardross estate offices.

Subsequently he passed into Aberdeen University and graduated B.Sc., specialising in agriculture. He joined the Collage staff and was engaged under Mr G. G. Esslemont in extension work. At the time of mobilisation, Lt. Black was organiser for the College in Sutherland and Caithness, where he became very popular and where his work was singularly effective. He joined up soon after the outbreak of war, selecting the 5th Seaforths for his unit, in which he reached commissioned rank. He has seen much service on the Western Front.

Assuming the technicalities of the discharge can be adjusted – a problem which Peace has done much to simplify, Lieut. Black will make an ideal head of the Craibstone Farm School. His practical knowledge of farming is all that it need be; his knowledge of small farming is first hand, his rare scientific attainments complete an edifice of accomplishment which is founded on rare natural gifts for organisation and keen perception of the psychology of men. He knows just what his students had best know to fit them for the land, and has the wisdom in giving them an all-round outlook not to “over-engine the vessel for all its beam”, to adopt a smile from another sphere.

Ross-shire men in particular will hope the appointment carries through, and those who aim at settling on the land will feel their luck is in if they are fortunate enough to secure enrolment in Lieut. Black’s company. Lt. Black’s aunt, Mrs Holm, resides at Viewhill, Alness. Lt. Black took up duty at Aberdeen last week; probably for good.

Photo: #5725

Burn A, Drummer, Alness

Drummer A. Burn

Date of Paper: 10.8.1917
Surname: Burn
First Name(s): A
Rank: Drummer
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

AN ALNESS SEAFORTH DRUMMER

A photograph is reproduced of 200227 Drummer A. Burn, Seaforths, son of Mr Burn, stationer, Alness. A member of Alness Company, he mobilised with the battalion in August 1914, and although just 16 years of age, proceeded to France in November, 1914. Drummer Burn served in the trenches in the first winter of the war, and was wounded in Neuve Chapelle in March, 1915. He was sent back to England, joining up the Reserve Seaforths, and is meantime serving with them somewhere in England. Drummer Burn, who celebrated his 19th birthday yesterday (August 9th) has crowded into the last three years what would be a lifetime’s experience to many.

Photo: #5764

Campbell Kenneth, Pte, Alness

Private Kenneth Campbell

Date of Paper: 03.11.1916
Surname: Campbell
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Alness

THE LATE PTE. CAMPBELL, ALNESS

Private Kenneth Campbell, Canadians, died on 13th October from wounds received on September 25th, belonged to Alness, where he was widely known and respected. He went out to Canada over six years ago. He joined the Canadian Forces last year, and had been in France since March of this year. He visited Alness at the New Year. His photograph appears in these columns.

Photo: #5761

Cormack James, Pte, Alness

Private James Cormack

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917
Surname: Cormack
First Name(s): James
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Moultavie, Alness

THE LATE PTE. JAMES CORMACK, ALNESS

As already reported, Pte. James Cormack, Seaforths, was killed in action on 23rd April. Twenty-one years of age, he was the son of Mr Cormack, foreman, Moultavie, Alness. At mobilisation in August, 1914, Pte. Cormack, who was a ploughman with his father at Moultavie, joined the 4th Seaforths. He was wounded some time ago, and, on recovery, was sent to another Seaforth battalion. His elder brother is serving, and his father’s two brothers have fallen.

Pte. Cormack’s commanding officer sent the following letter to his parents: “I cannot express how much I feel for you in your sad loss. Your son will be greatly missed by me and his comrades. He was always a soldier, and performed his duty with thoroughness and keenness, which made him a valuable man to me.” A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #5752

Darling David, Pte, Alness

Private David Darling

Date of Paper: 05.01.1917
Surname: Darling
First Name(s): David
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Alness

THE LATE PTE. DAVID DARLING, SEAFORTHS

Pte. David Darling, son of the late George Darling , postman, and of Mrs Darling, Alness, fell on the 10th ult. at the Somme, aged 21. Before enlisting David was employed in the Nurseries, Novar, and was a most exemplary young man. Much sympathy is felt for his widowed mother. Her eldest son is also in the Seaforths. A photograph of Pte. Darling is given on this page.

Photo: #5771

Ferguson Thomas J, Pte, Alness

Private Thomas J. Ferguson

Date of Paper: 26.10.1917
Surname: Ferguson
First Name(s): Thomas J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths / Argyle & Sutherland
Home Address: Millcraig, Alness.

Regret is everywhere expressed at the news received last week that Private Tom. J. Ferguson, Seaforths (attached to the Argyle and Sutherlands), had been killed in the recent successful advance. He was born at Dunballoch, Beauly, and would have only reached his 20th birthday next month. He was the eldest son of Mr Donald Ferguson, cattleman, Millcraig, Alness, who is a native of Dunvegan, Isle of Skye, but who has served in many farms in Inverness and Ross during the past 27 years.

Deepest sympathy is extended to him and the other members of his family in their great loss. Private Ferguson was a very fine young fellow, and a general favourite with all his friends and associates. He carried his popularity with him into the Army, as the following letter, which has been received from his Captain, shows.

Captain Mackenzie writes as follows: “It is with great sorrow that I have to break to you the sad news of your son’s death in the recent fighting. He was killed in action by a fragment of shell on the 23rd of this month, and death was instantaneous. Just previously he had being doing fine work at his post of duty in the front line at a very trying time. I know how little any words of mine can help you to bear the sad news, but I wish to let you know that, in your great loss, you have the sincere sympathy of all your boy’s comrades and his officers. We miss him greatly; how great your loss is we can only imagine. Your boy was a great favourite with us all. It may help you to know that the good work done by your son and his comrades was of particular value at one stage of the present battle; and such deeds all help to bring this awful war to an end. Your son is one of the many who have given their lives for others. May you find strength and consolation in your great loss.”

A photograph is reproduced to -day.

Photo: #5753

Finlayson David, Pte, Alness

Private David Finlayson

Date of Paper: 11.04.1919
Surname: Finlayson
First Name(s): David
Rank: Private
Regiment: Highland Light Infantry
Home Address: Sea Shore, Alness.

THE LATE PTE. DAVID FINLAYSON, ALNESS

Above is reproduced a photograph of Private David Finlayson, Highland Light Infantry , youngest son of Mr and Mrs Finlayson, Sea Shore, Alness.

Pte. Finlayson was a fine type of soldier and a splendid marksman. He enlisted in the H.L.I. early in 1917, and went with his battalion to France in 1918. He saw some severe fighting, and was wounded. Unfortunately his wounds proved fatal, and he died on 29th September, 1918, at a clearing station behind the lines.

Much sympathy is felt for the sorrowing parents and family at home and abroad.

Photo: #5728

Fraser J, Gunner, Alness

Gunner J. Fraser

Date of Paper: Year possibly 1914?
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Field Artillery
Home Address: Rustic Cottage, Alness

FIRST HIGHLAND MILITARY FUNERAL IN FRANCE

Among the first of the British Expeditionary Force who made the supreme sacrifice in France in the woeful and ever memorable autumn of 1914 – that dread year when the nations and their rulers went mad with the lust of battle – was a gallant young Easter Ross man. His was, indeed, the first Highland military funeral witnessed on the other side of the Channel. Although almost six years have elapsed since that sad day, we venture to recall it, if only to show that be the end death or victory, the Highlander is always found where duty calls him.

On Wednesday, 24th September, 1914, a letter, dated 24th September, 1914, was received from the chaplain by Miss Macleod, Rustic Cottage, Alness, intimating the death of her half-brother, Gunner J. Fraser, of the R.F.A., which took place on Saturday in a hospital train shortly before reaching Villenline, near Paris, from a shrapnel wound in the thigh. The wound had been carefully dressed at the field ambulance where the fighting took place, N.E. of Paris. “He was buried,” the chaplain relates, “with a private of the Coldstream Guards, who died on another hospital train on Saturday afternoon, in the Protestant Cemetery. An escort of 20 French soldiers walked on each side of the hearse. The coffin was covered with a black pall with an English flag on top, and many bouquets of flowers placed upon it. Behind came an escort of London Scottish Territorials, 50 strong, and afterwards there followed a long procession of French citizens, with Mayors of both villages. One made a speech at the graveside, belauding the courage of the British troops, and especially instancing that of your brother and the Coldstream Guardsman. There were about 500 wounded in the train.” John was born at Lagavulin, Novar, and was 25 years of age when he met his death. He served seven years in the R.F.A., and when called out he acted as chauffeur to his old Colonel.
In the Morning Post a few days before the news of Gunner Fraser’s death was received by his sister, there appeared from the pen of its War Correspondent the following reference to the funeral: “A Highlander had died in one of the hospital trains coming from the front. I could not learn his regiment, but a piper of the London Scottish playing a Highland coronach followed the artillery caisson which carried the coffin. The scene was most impressive, simple as the ceremony was, and it deeply affected the French people, who joined in the cortege in large numbers. Hastily, wreaths were found, and the dead Highlander lies buried in the pretty cemetery of the little town with every token of respectful farewell.”

It is worthy of note that a young brother of the deceased, Alex. Macleod of the Tank Corps and now of the Edinburgh Police, won the D.C.M. after being only about two months at the front. Prior to going South quite recently he was employed at Dalmore Mining Centre.

Photo: #5774

Fraser Roderick, QMS, Alness

Company Quartermaster Sergeant Roderick J. Fraser

Date of Paper: 11.01.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Company Quartermaster Sergeant
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Home Address: High Street, Alness

There is reproduced today a photograph of Coy. Quartermaster Sergt. Roderick J. Fraser, M.G.C., whose sister, Miss C. Fraser, High Street, Alness, as reported last week, has been informed of his death in action, he having been killed by shell fire on December 2nd. Company Quartermaster Segeant Fraser was a son of the late Mr Hugh Fraser, blacksmith, Alness, and a nephew of Mrs Munro, draper, Alness. Before the war he served in India with the 1st Seaforths, but was invalided out of the army and, returning to the North, was working at Invergordon when war broke out. He was not accepted for the Army although several times offering himself for enlistment, but by the end of 1914 he succeeded in enlisting and was posted to the 4th Seaforths early in 1915, training at Dingwall and elsewhere. He had been on the Western front for a considerable time, having been early transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

Deceased, who was 24 years of age, was a very nice fellow, quiet and amiable and highly respected by his comrades.

Deep sympathy is felt with the family and particularly with Mrs Munro who cared for them in their earlier years when the father and mother died.

Photo: #5760

Gair J, Pte, Alness

Private J. Gair

Date of Paper: 12.05.1916
Surname: Gair
First Name(s): J.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not stated
Home Address: St John’s Bank, Alness

Gair, Private J., 1706, son of Mr Gair, St John’s Bank, Alness, was a bright young lad who joined in 1913, and went out to France in November 1914. Never missing a fatigue or a test, he went through Neuve Chapelle without a scratch. One of the first over the parapet, his death was mourned by his surviving comrades, among whom he was a favourite.

Photo: #5744

Kennedy Alexander, Pte, Alness

Private Alexander Kennedy

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stettingham, Alness

THE LATE SGT. NEIL KENNEDY, ALNESS THREE SEAFORTH BROTHERS

Sergeant Neil Kennedy, Seaforths, who as we reported recently, died of wounds on 17th April, was the second son of Mr John Kennedy, Stettingham, Alness. Sergt. Kennedy was wounded in the chest. For four days he was treated in France, and latterly was transferred to Chetnole Red Cross Hospital, Dorset, where he succumbed to his injuries. Thirty years of age, deceased enlisted in the county territorial regiment at the outbreak of war, and after training proceeded to France in November, 1914. He was in the battles of Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge. Subsequently he was wounded but he never had occasion to leave the battalion. He was a favourite in the battalion, a capable and trustworthy non-com., and the sympathy of his comrades goes out to the sorrowing parents. The remains of deceased were brought home to Alness and interred with full military honours. Major Cuthbert, C.M.G., D.S.O., represented the regiment while the pipers and firing party came from a neighbouring Seaforth garrison.

Private Alexander Kennedy (22) is at present in No. 3 Western General Hospital, Newport, Mon. He is suffering from trench feet . On two previous occasions he was wounded, one of them being at Aubers Ridge.

Private Colin Kennedy (19) since the war started was engaged in a Government patrol boat but immediately he came of military age came home and enlisted in the Seaforths. In August last he went to France, and, so far, has escaped injury.

A portrait of the three Seaforth brothers appears to-day.

See entries below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5749

Kennedy Colin, Pte, Alness

Private Colin Kennedy

Date of Pape: 11.05.1917
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): Colin
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stettingham, Alness

THE LATE SGT. NEIL KENNEDY, ALNESS THREE SEAFORTH BROTHERS

Sergeant Neil Kennedy, Seaforths, who as we reported recently, died of wounds on 17th April, was the second son of Mr John Kennedy, Stettingham, Alness. Sergt. Kennedy was wounded in the chest. For four days he was treated in France, and latterly was transferred to Chetnole Red Cross Hospital, Dorset, where he succumbed to his injuries. Thirty years of age, deceased enlisted in the county territorial regiment at the outbreak of war, and after training proceeded to France in November, 1914. He was in the battles of Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge. Subsequently he was wounded but he never had occasion to leave the battalion. He was a favourite in the battalion, a capable and trustworthy non-com., and the sympathy of his comrades goes out to the sorrowing parents. The remains of deceased were brought home to Alness and interred with full military honours. Major Cuthbert, C.M.G., D.S.O., represented the regiment while the pipers and firing party came from a neighbouring Seaforth garrison.

Private Alexander Kennedy (22) is at present in No. 3 Western General Hospital, Newport, Mon. He is suffering from trench feet . On two previous occasions he was wounded, one of them being at Aubers Ridge.

Private Colin Kennedy (19) since the war started was engaged in a Government patrol boat but immediately he came of military age came home and enlisted in the Seaforths. In August last he went to France, and, so far, has escaped injury.

A portrait of the three Seaforth brothers appears to-day.

See entry above and entry below for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5782

Kennedy Neil, Sgt, Alness

Sergeant Neil Kennedy

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: Kennedy
First Name(s): Neil
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Stettingham, Alness

THE LATE SGT. NEIL KENNEDY, ALNESS THREE SEAFORTH BROTHERS

Sergeant Neil Kennedy, Seaforths, who as we reported recently, died of wounds on 17th April, was the second son of Mr John Kennedy, Stettingham, Alness. Sergt. Kennedy was wounded in the chest. For four days he was treated in France, and latterly was transferred to Chetnole Red Cross Hospital, Dorset, where he succumbed to his injuries. Thirty years of age, deceased enlisted in the county territorial regiment at the outbreak of war, and after training proceeded to France in November, 1914. He was in the battles of Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge. Subsequently he was wounded but he never had occasion to leave the battalion. He was a favourite in the battalion, a capable and trustworthy non-com., and the sympathy of his comrades goes out to the sorrowing parents. The remains of deceased were brought home to Alness and interred with full military honours. Major Cuthbert, C.M.G., D.S.O., represented the regiment while the pipers and firing party came from a neighbouring Seaforth garrison.

Private Alexander Kennedy (22) is at present in No. 3 Western General Hospital, Newport, Mon. He is suffering from trench feet . On two previous occasions he was wounded, one of them being at Aubers Ridge.

Private Colin Kennedy (19) since the war started was engaged in a Government patrol boat but immediately he came of military age came home and enlisted in the Seaforths. In August last he went to France, and, so far, has escaped injury.

A portrait of the three Seaforth brothers appears to-day.

See entries above for details of his two brothers

Photo: #5742

Logan A, Pte, Alness

Private A. Logan

Date of Paper: 21.02.1919
Surname: Logan
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Canada (formerly Acharn, Boath, Alness )

The photographs of two soldier sons of Mr Logan, Acharn, Boath, Alness, are reproduced today. A third son recently distinguished himself at a Canadian fire.

L./Corpl. Donald Logan (49652), M.G.C., who is 22 years of age, joined up on August 5th, 1914. He went overseas to the East in the Spring of 1915 and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. Subsequent he moved to Egypt and Sinai and shared in the recent fighting at Jerusalem, where, as recently reported, he was wounded in action. L./Cpl. Logan was his father’s only help on the farm.
Pte. A. Logan, Canadians, is 24 years of age. He joined up in January, 1916, and has been two years in France. He emigrated some years ago. He was a policeman for a time, but turned to farming.
Mr Logan has another son, Sergt. Thos. Logan, who is in the City Police Force, Regina, Sask., Canada. Recently Sergt. Logan greatly distinguished himself at a fire which broke out in Regina Winter Fair Buildings where 700 soldiers were housed. Sergt. Logan early detected the outbreak, and but for his prompt alarm and the practical steps he took, it was stated at the time, many lives would have been lost. Soldiers say that few of them would have escaped but for Sergt Logan’s promptness.

The Canadian Press has published the photograph of this gallant Alness boy, given him the highest praise.

See entry below for details of his brother Donald Logan

Photo: #5732

Logan Donald, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal Donald Logan

Date of Paper: 21.02.1919
Surname: Logan
First Name(s): A.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Canada (formerly Acharn, Boath, Alness )

The photographs of two soldier sons of Mr Logan, Acharn, Boath, Alness, are reproduced today. A third son recently distinguished himself at a Canadian fire.

L./Corpl. Donald Logan (49652), M.G.C., who is 22 years of age, joined up on August 5th, 1914. He went overseas to the East in the Spring of 1915 and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. Subsequent he moved to Egypt and Sinai and shared in the recent fighting at Jerusalem, where, as recently reported, he was wounded in action. L./Cpl. Logan was his father’s only help on the farm.
Pte. A. Logan, Canadians, is 24 years of age. He joined up in January, 1916, and has been two years in France. He emigrated some years ago. He was a policeman for a time, but turned to farming.
Mr Logan has another son, Sergt. Thos. Logan, who is in the City Police Force, Regina, Sask., Canada. Recently Sergt. Logan greatly distinguished himself at a fire which broke out in Regina Winter Fair Buildings where 700 soldiers were housed. Sergt. Logan early detected the outbreak, and but for his prompt alarm and the practical steps he took, it was stated at the time, many lives would have been lost. Soldiers say that few of them would have escaped but for Sergt Logan’s promptness.

The Canadian Press has published the photograph of this gallant Alness boy, given him the highest praise.

See entry above for details of his brother A. Logan

Photo: #5737

Macaskill John, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal John Macaskill

Date of Paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Macaskill
Forename: John
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers
Home Address: 1, Cameron’s Buildings, Alness (formerly Dingwall)

TWO DINGWALL SOLDIER BROTHERS

As recently reported, Mr D. Mackenzie, 1, Cameron’s Buildings, Alness, who is employed at Invergordon, and formerly resided in Dingwall, has received official intimation from the Record Office at Perth that his brother, Lance-Corpl. John Macaskill, 20, Northumberland Fusiliers, has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl. Macaskill joined the Ross Mountain Battery about two years ago, and was transferred to the Tyneside Scottish. He had been only five weeks in France. In peace times he was a baker with Mr Andrew Murray, Dingwall, but was working in Berwick when he joined up voluntarily.

A brother, Pte. Roderick Macaskill, Seaforths, was wounded recently at Arras, and is in hospital in London. Formerly Pte. Roderick Macaskill was a draper with Mr Colin Stewart, Dingwall. He joined the Scots Greys, and was transferred to the Seaforths. Much sympathy is felt with the brother in Alness, who, after bereft of both father and mother, sturdily and independently maintained a home, and practically brought up a young family left on his hands.

Photographs of the two soldiers appear today.

See entry below for details of his brother Roderick Macaskill

Photo: #5769

Macaskill Roderick, Pte, Alness

Private Roderick Macaskill

Date of Paper: 06.07.1917
Surname: Macaskill
Forename: Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: 1, Cameron’s Buildings, Alness (formerly Dingwall)

TWO DINGWALL SOLDIER BROTHERS

As recently reported, Mr D. Mackenzie, 1, Cameron’s Buildings, Alness, who is employed at Invergordon, and formerly resided in Dingwall, has received official intimation from the Record Office at Perth that his brother, Lance-Corpl. John Macaskill, 20, Northumberland Fusiliers, has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl. Macaskill joined the Ross Mountain Battery about two years ago, and was transferred to the Tyneside Scottish. He had been only five weeks in France. In peace times he was a baker with Mr Andrew Murray, Dingwall, but was working in Berwick when he joined up voluntarily.

A brother, Pte. Roderick Macaskill, Seaforths, was wounded recently at Arras, and is in hospital in London. Formerly Pte. Roderick Macaskill was a draper with Mr Colin Stewart, Dingwall. He joined the Scots Greys, and was transferred to the Seaforths. Much sympathy is felt with the brother in Alness, who, after bereft of both father and mother, sturdily and independently maintained a home, and practically brought up a young family left on his hands.

Photographs of the two soldiers appear today.

See entry above for details of his brother John Macaskill

Photo: #5734

Macculloch Finlay, L Corp, Alness

Lance Corporal Finlay Macculloch

Date of Paper: 29.12.1916
Surname: Macculloch
Forename(s): Finlay
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Dalmore, Alness

THE LATE L./C. F. MACCULLOCH, SEAFORTHS

The above is a portrait of the late Lance Corporal Finlay Macculloch, Seaforths, who was killed in France on 16th November 1916. Deceased was the third son of Mr John Macculloch, Dalmore, Alness. A gardener to trade, he served his apprenticeship with the late Mr Reid, gardener, Lemlair, after which he held posts at Foulis Castle and at Ardullie. At the outbreak of war he joined the county territorial regiment, and went to France with them in November 1914. He came through all the engagements in which his regiment took part without a scratch, until he was hit by shrapnel on 16th November. He was a brave and gallant youth, and very popular.