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Photo: #6431

Fanning A J, Sgt, Munlochy

Sergeant A. J. Fanning

Date of Paper: 28.11.1917
Surname: Fanning
First Name(s): A. J.
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths / Royal Engineers
Home Address: Allangrange, Munlochy.

Sergeant A. J. Fanning, R.E, son of Mr and Mrs Fanning, Allangrange, Ross-shire, has been awarded the D.C.M. for an act of bravery he performed on the 28th June 1917. Sergeant Fanning joined the Seaforths in September, 1914, and went to France with the Territorial Battalion in November of the same year. He was transferred to the Royal Engineers in February, 1916. He was slightly wounded on the 27th April, but still remained on duty.

Sergt. Fanning is now in hospital in France, but his many friends wish him a speedy recovery.
His younger brother, Corporal Kenneth Fanning, who has been on active service with the Seaforths since June, 1916, has just returned to the firing line after a ten days’ leave.

Photographs of the two brothers will be found on this page.

Photo: #6419

Fanning K, Corp, Munlochy

Corporal Kenneth Fanning

Date of Paper: 28.11.1917
Surname: Fanning
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Allangrange, Munlochy.

Sergeant A. J. Fanning, R.E, son of Mr and Mrs Fanning, Allangrange, Ross-shire, has been awarded the D.C.M. for an act of bravery he performed on the 28th June 1917. Sergeant Fanning joined the Seaforths in September, 1914, and went to France with the Territorial Battalion in November of the same year. He was transferred to the Royal Engineers in February, 1916. He was slightly wounded on the 27th April, but still remained on duty.

Sergt. Fanning is now in hospital in France, but his many friends wish him a speedy recovery.
His younger brother, Corporal Kenneth Fanning, who has been on active service with the Seaforths since June, 1916, has just returned to the firing line after a ten days’ leave.

Photographs of the two brothers will be found on this page.

Photo: #6429

Macdonald Roderick, Pte, Munlochy

Private Roderick Macdonald

Date of Paper: 25.01.1918
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Roderick
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Muirton, Munlochy

Private Roderick Macdonald, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 12th October, 1917, was 23 years of age, was the son of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Muirton, Munlochy, and late of Claythorpes Farm, Brahan. His photograph appears today. Pte. Macdonald joined up in December 1914 and was posted to the first of Kitchener’s Seaforth battalions. Immediately before the war he was a farm servant at Allanglack, Allangrange.

Two brothers are in the Army. Pte. Colin Macdonald is serving with the Canadians in France, and Sergt. Duncan D. Macdonald, R.F.A., for some time assistant draper with Mr Colin Mackenzie, Tartan Warehouse, Dingwall, is also on the Western Front. In a letter, Captain Charles Hay says: “It is with deepest regret I have to announce to you the death of your son, Pte. R. Macdonald, on the morning of 12th October. He was on his way to battalion H.Q., but he never arrived there, the probability being that he was killed en route. We have been waiting all this time for news of him from the hospitals, but he has not been admitted, so we can only conclude he was hit on the way down. He was such a splendid fellow, and through his noble qualities he was appointed a battalion stretcher-bearer, a duty for which only the best are chosen, as it entails every good quality a man can possess. It is awful not being able to give you any further news, but that is all we can find out about him. Please accept my sincere sympathy on the loss of such a splendid soldier and a good son, as I feel sure he always was.”

No photo available

Gunner Duncan Maclean

Date of Paper: 29.06.1917
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: R.G.A.
Home Address: Balnakyle, Munlochy

THREE STALWART BLACK ISLE SOLDIERS

There is reproduced to-day photographs of the stalwart Black Isle soldiers, the only sons of Mrs Maclean who is a widow, and resides near Balnakyle. The three men are splendid specimens of the Celtic race, every one of them is over six feet high, and of striking, very handsome appearance.
Pte. Simon Maclean is in his 24th year he emigrated some years ago to New Zealand giving up a lucrative position there to join a (unclear) of the New Zealand boys. He has taken part in several engagements on the Western Front. He was wounded and sent to hospital in this country, since when he has been doing well somewhere in the south of England.
Pte Hugh Maclean is in his 22nd year. Hugh is the second son who answered the call, he joined the 4th Seaforths; proceeding with them in November, 1914, to France. With the exception of an interval when he was (unclear) suffering from trench feet, he has been with the battalion in France throughout. He is an excellent shot, he has been principally engaged in sniping.
Pte. William Maclean is in his 19th year. Immediately on attaining military age he joined the 4th Seaforths, and proceeding to France was attached to the transport corps. All three boys began their services in the employment of the late Mr C. M. Cameron (unclear), and latterly with Captain James Cameron, who as is well-known along with his brother, Captain C.M, Cameron, was one of the officers to proceed to France at the call of duty.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Mrs Maclean, a widow, who resides near Balnakyle, Munlochy, has just received the sorrowful news that the eldest of her four sons serving has died of wounds. In June last, we printed photographs of the three elder sons, fine stalwart Highlanders, each one of them over six feet in height.
Sergt. Simon Maclean, New Zealanders, the elder son, who died of wounds on 22nd November, went to New Zealand in 1912, and was in the employment of Mr Robert (unclear). Stationed at Miller’s Flat when war broke out. He joined the Otago battalion at the outbreak of war, and had been twice wounded. Before going abroad he was in the service of the late Mr C.M. Cameron, Balnakyle. Deceased was 24 years of age. His photo appears to-day.
L/Corpl. Hugh Maclean, Seaforths, aged 22, the second son was wounded in the throat in the recent fighting and is now in the Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen. He has been with the County Territorials in France since November, 1914. An excellent shot he was a noted and daring sniper.
Gunner Duncan Maclean, R.G.A., who was severely wounded in November has lost his right leg and is in hospital in France.
In her bereavement and continued anxiety, deep sympathy will be universal here at home and among friends at the front with Mrs Maclean who has been so righteously proud of her soldier sons and their splendid record.

See entries below for details of his brothers Hugh, Simon & William Maclean

Photo: #5887

Maclean Hugh, Pte, Balnakyle

Private Hugh Maclean

Date of Paper: 29.06.1917 and 14.12.1917
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): Hugh
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balnakyle, Munlochy

THREE STALWART BLACK ISLE SOLDIERS

There is reproduced to-day photographs of the stalwart Black Isle soldiers, the only sons of Mrs Maclean who is a widow, and resides near Balnakyle. The three men are splendid specimens of the Celtic race, every one of them is over six feet high, and of striking, very handsome appearance.
Pte. Simon Maclean is in his 24th year he emigrated some years ago to New Zealand giving up a lucrative position there to join a (unclear) of the New Zealand boys. He has taken part in several engagements on the Western Front. He was wounded and sent to hospital in this country, since when he has been doing well somewhere in the south of England.
Pte Hugh Maclean is in his 22nd year. Hugh is the second son who answered the call, he joined the 4th Seaforths; proceeding with them in November, 1914, to France. With the exception of an interval when he was (unclear) suffering from trench feet, he has been with the battalion in France throughout. He is an excellent shot, he has been principally engaged in sniping.
Pte. William Maclean is in his 19th year. Immediately on attaining military age he joined the 4th Seaforths, and proceeding to France was attached to the transport corps. All three boys began their services in the employment of the late Mr C. M. Cameron (unclear), and latterly with Captain James Cameron, who as is well-known along with his brother, Captain C.M, Cameron, was one of the officers to proceed to France at the call of duty.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Mrs Maclean, a widow, who resides near Balnakyle, Munlochy, has just received the sorrowful news that the eldest of her four sons serving has died of wounds. In June last, we printed photographs of the three elder sons, fine stalwart Highlanders, each one of them over six feet in height.
Sergt. Simon Maclean, New Zealanders, the elder son, who died of wounds on 22nd November, went to New Zealand in 1912, and was in the employment of Mr Robert (unclear). Stationed at Miller’s Flat when war broke out. He joined the Otago battalion at the outbreak of war, and had been twice wounded. Before going abroad he was in the service of the late Mr C.M. Cameron, Balnakyle. Deceased was 24 years of age. His photo appears to-day.
L/Corpl. Hugh Maclean, Seaforths, aged 22, the second son was wounded in the throat in the recent fighting and is now in the Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen. He has been with the County Territorials in France since November, 1914. An excellent shot he was a noted and daring sniper.
Gunner Duncan Maclean, R.G.A., who was severely wounded in November has lost his right leg and is in hospital in France.
In her bereavement and continued anxiety, deep sympathy will be universal here at home and among friends at the front with Mrs Maclean who has been so righteously proud of her soldier sons and their splendid record.

See entries below for his brothers Simon & William and entry above for his brother Duncan Maclean

Photo: #5888

Maclean Simon, Pte, Balnakyle

Sergeant Simon Maclean

Date of Paper: 29.06.1917
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): Simon
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: New Zealanders
Home Address: New Zealand, ex-Balnakyle, Munlochy

THREE STALWART BLACK ISLE SOLDIERS

There is reproduced to-day photographs of the stalwart Black Isle soldiers, the only sons of Mrs Maclean who is a widow, and resides near Balnakyle. The three men are splendid specimens of the Celtic race, every one of them is over six feet high, and of striking, very handsome appearance.
Pte. Simon Maclean is in his 24th year he emigrated some years ago to New Zealand giving up a lucrative position there to join a (unclear) of the New Zealand boys. He has taken part in several engagements on the Western Front. He was wounded and sent to hospital in this country, since when he has been doing well somewhere in the south of England.
Pte Hugh Maclean is in his 22nd year. Hugh is the second son who answered the call, he joined the 4th Seaforths; proceeding with them in November, 1914, to France. With the exception of an interval when he was (unclear) suffering from trench feet, he has been with the battalion in France throughout. He is an excellent shot, he has been principally engaged in sniping.
Pte. William Maclean is in his 19th year. Immediately on attaining military age he joined the 4th Seaforths, and proceeding to France was attached to the transport corps. All three boys began their services in the employment of the late Mr C. M. Cameron (unclear), and latterly with Captain James Cameron, who as is well-known along with his brother, Captain C.M, Cameron, was one of the officers to proceed to France at the call of duty.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Mrs Maclean, a widow, who resides near Balnakyle, Munlochy, has just received the sorrowful news that the eldest of her four sons serving has died of wounds. In June last, we printed photographs of the three elder sons, fine stalwart Highlanders, each one of them over six feet in height.
Sergt. Simon Maclean, New Zealanders, the elder son, who died of wounds on 22nd November, went to New Zealand in 1912, and was in the employment of Mr Robert (unclear). Stationed at Miller’s Flat when war broke out. He joined the Otago battalion at the outbreak of war, and had been twice wounded. Before going abroad he was in the service of the late Mr C.M. Cameron, Balnakyle. Deceased was 24 years of age. His photo appears to-day.
L/Corpl. Hugh Maclean, Seaforths, aged 22, the second son was wounded in the throat in the recent fighting and is now in the Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen. He has been with the County Territorials in France since November, 1914. An excellent shot he was a noted and daring sniper.
Gunner Duncan Maclean, R.G.A., who was severely wounded in November has lost his right leg and is in hospital in France.
In her bereavement and continued anxiety, deep sympathy will be universal here at home and among friends at the front with Mrs Maclean who has been so righteously proud of her soldier sons and their splendid record.

See entries above for details of his brothers Duncan & Hugh and entry below for his brother William Maclean

Photo: #5889

Maclean William, Pte, Balnakyle

Private William Maclean

Date of Paper: 26.06.1917
Surname: Maclean
First Name(s): William
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Balnakyle, Munlochy

THREE STALWART BLACK ISLE SOLDIERS

There is reproduced to-day photographs of the stalwart Black Isle soldiers, the only sons of Mrs Maclean who is a widow, and resides near Balnakyle. The three men are splendid specimens of the Celtic race, every one of them is over six feet high, and of striking, very handsome appearance.
Pte. Simon Maclean is in his 24th year he emigrated some years ago to New Zealand giving up a lucrative position there to join a (unclear) of the New Zealand boys. He has taken part in several engagements on the Western Front. He was wounded and sent to hospital in this country, since when he has been doing well somewhere in the south of England.
Pte Hugh Maclean is in his 22nd year. Hugh is the second son who answered the call, he joined the 4th Seaforths; proceeding with them in November, 1914, to France. With the exception of an interval when he was (unclear) suffering from trench feet, he has been with the battalion in France throughout. He is an excellent shot, he has been principally engaged in sniping.
Pte. William Maclean is in his 19th year. Immediately on attaining military age he joined the 4th Seaforths, and proceeding to France was attached to the transport corps. All three boys began their services in the employment of the late Mr C. M. Cameron (unclear), and latterly with Captain James Cameron, who as is well-known along with his brother, Captain C.M, Cameron, was one of the officers to proceed to France at the call of duty.

Date of Paper: 14.12.1917

Mrs Maclean, a widow, who resides near Balnakyle, Munlochy, has just received the sorrowful news that the eldest of her four sons serving has died of wounds. In June last, we printed photographs of the three elder sons, fine stalwart Highlanders, each one of them over six feet in height.
Sergt. Simon Maclean, New Zealanders, the elder son, who died of wounds on 22nd November, went to New Zealand in 1912, and was in the employment of Mr Robert (unclear). Stationed at Miller’s Flat when war broke out. He joined the Otago battalion at the outbreak of war, and had been twice wounded. Before going abroad he was in the service of the late Mr C.M. Cameron, Balnakyle. Deceased was 24 years of age. His photo appears to-day.
L/Corpl. Hugh Maclean, Seaforths, aged 22, the second son was wounded in the throat in the recent fighting and is now in the Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen. He has been with the County Territorials in France since November, 1914. An excellent shot he was a noted and daring sniper.
Gunner Duncan Maclean, R.G.A., who was severely wounded in November has lost his right leg and is in hospital in France.
In her bereavement and continued anxiety, deep sympathy will be universal here at home and among friends at the front with Mrs Maclean who has been so righteously proud of her soldier sons and their splendid record.

See entries above for details of his brothers Duncan, Hugh & Simon Maclean

Photo: #6421

Moir Alexander, L Corp, Munlochy

Lance Corporal Alexander Moir

Date of Paper: 15.06.1917 and 28.12.1917
Surname: Moir
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Easter Suddie, Munlochy, ex-Evanton

MILITARY MEDAL FOR ROSS-SHIRE SEAFORTH

Lance Corpl. Alexander Moir (201561), Seaforths, who, as already announced, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field, is the son of Mr Moir, late manager, Balconie Farm, Evanton, and Mrs Moir, Easter Suddie, Munlochy. Before joining the county battalion in November, 1915, Lance-Corpl. Moir was engaged on Balconie Farm with his father. After four months training with the Reserve Battalion in England he went out to France in March 1916. He has been in much fighting, and has twice been wounded, once in April, 1916, and again in July of the same year. He took part in the push on April 9th, and it was for conspicuous gallantry in the field that he was decorated. Popular with his comrades, all ranks extend congratulations to this brave young soldier.
A photograph appears to-day. [15.06.1917]

Date of Paper: 28.12.1917

As recently reported, Mr and Mrs Moir, Easter Suddie, Munlochy, have been notified of the death in action of their only son, Corpl. Alex Moir, M.M, Seaforths, whose photograph is reproduced to-day. Deceased, who had just entered on his 25th year, joining up in November 1915, and went to France in March, 1916. Wounded in April, 1916, he made a good recovery and soon rejoined his unit to be again wounded in July, 1916. In April last he was in the heavy fighting at Arras, and it was for gallantry displayed then that he won the Military Medal. Just two months ago he was home on leave.

Deceased was a bright, happy youth, and held the high esteem of all ranks in his company. Before enlisting he was employed on Balconie Farm, Evanton. Much sympathy is felt with his paprents and two sisters in their bereavement.

The Captain of his company (Capt. C. Hamilton Harris) writes: “He fell during a heavy counter-attack by the enemy……… Your son was just near me working his own Lewis gun with deadly effect against the enemy when a sniper’s bullet struck him in the head, and he fell beside his gun, dead. To describe what your son has done during different actions would fill pages. Always a cool, courgeous, and cheerful soldier, he gave great confidence to his gun team, and on every occasion he shone brillantly ………… It is beyond us all to realise what a tower of support we have lost.” Captain Harris concludes with a touching message of sympathy from all ranks to the parents.

[Handwritten notes (conflicting?): “Feb. 15/18 – Recorded Prisoner. May 31/18 – Home in hospital.”]

Moodie Brothers, Munlochy

Photo: #6424

Moodie Andrew, Pte, Munlochy

Private Andrew Moodie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Moodie
First Name(s): Andrew
Rank: Private
Regiment: South Africans
Home Address: South Africa (formerly Drumderfit Farm, Munlochy)

FIVE SOLDIER SONS OF A ROSS-SHIRE FARMER

Photographs are reproduced to-day of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Henry Moodie, Drumderfit, Munlochy, and formerly of Dingwall. The parents of these gallant lads, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice, are well-known in Ross-shire. Before taking up the large farm of Drumderfit, Mr Moodie conducted a large and successful business in Dingwall, building up a trade with widespread ramifications all over the country. In the community Mr and Mrs Moodie have been held in high esteem, and at the moment they have the deep sympathy of the community in the loss of their second son, Captain Ralph W. Moodie, Gordons, which makes the first real break in a large family of sons.

Private Andrew Moodie, South Africans [obliterated] the father, is a baker to trade. He went out to South Africa five years ago, and was employed at Sabie and Johannesburg, and when war broke out he answered the call of Empire and joined Botha’s forces. After sharing in the earlier part of the campaign, he came [obliterated] with the first African contingent, and saw much fighting on the Western Front. Meantime he is in hospital suffering from injuries received under fire, and it is possible [remainder obliterated]

…….. recently reported. The facts of his career may be briefly recalled. After serving several years in the law offices of Mr Burns, solicitor, Dingwall, he proceeded to Glasgow and took classes preparatory to the regular law course of the University. Subsequently he entered an Edinburgh agent’s office, and pursued his studies at Edinburgh University, and when war broke out these were all but completed. An old Territorial, well-remembered as drummer to the pipe band of the 4th Seaforths, he joined the Royal Scots at mobilisation, and was on the Western Front with his battalion in 1915, when he was recalled at the instance of Lt. Colonel George, of the Banffshire Gordons, who desired his services as an officer. Obtaining commissioned rank, he became, successively, adjutant and captain, and did excellent work both in recruiting under the Derby scheme and in training men for the line.

Just before the spring push, Captain Moodie was given a staff appointment, and subsequently went to France, where he temporarily rejoined his unit. It was in his first engagement as an officer that he fell leading his men. A young man of high natural ability, unlimited push, and of strong character in the pursuit of his work, whatever it might be, he was pleasant and popular; a loyal son and a staunch friend.

Private Clement Theodore Moodie, the third son, is a Cameron Highlander. A baker to trade, he joined the Camerons at Kilmacolm, Glasgow, where he was employed, as soon as Kitchener’s call was public. Wounded five times and gassed twice, he has been in the thick of the fighting on the Western front. At present he is stationed at the reserve centre of his regiment somewhere in the North.
Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs Moodie, belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery, having joined this unit while stationed in Inverness, where he was employed before the war in Rose Street Foundry. He went East early in the war, where his unit has done magnificent work. Injured in the knee by a kick from a horse, he returned to England, where at present he is with the details of his unit.

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie, the youngest son with the colours, is attached to the Gordons. Not yet 19 years, he is at a training reserve centre somewhere on the East Coast.

See entries above and below for the five brothers in the Moodie family

Photo: #6425

Moodie Clement T, Pte, Munlochy

Private Clement Theodore Moodie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Moodie
First Name(s): Clement Theodore
Rank: Private
Regiment: Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Glasgow (formerly Drumderfit Farm, Munlochy)

FIVE SOLDIER SONS OF A ROSS-SHIRE FARMER

Photographs are reproduced to-day of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Henry Moodie, Drumderfit, Munlochy, and formerly of Dingwall. The parents of these gallant lads, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice, are well-known in Ross-shire. Before taking up the large farm of Drumderfit, Mr Moodie conducted a large and successful business in Dingwall, building up a trade with widespread ramifications all over the country. In the community Mr and Mrs Moodie have been held in high esteem, and at the moment they have the deep sympathy of the community in the loss of their second son, Captain Ralph W. Moodie, Gordons, which makes the first real break in a large family of sons.

Private Andrew Moodie, South Africans [obliterated] the father, is a baker to trade. He went out to South Africa five years ago, and was employed at Sabie and Johannesburg, and when war broke out he answered the call of Empire and joined Botha’s forces. After sharing in the earlier part of the campaign, he came [obliterated] with the first African contingent, and saw much fighting on the Western Front. Meantime he is in hospital suffering from injuries received under fire, and it is possible [remainder obliterated]

…….. recently reported. The facts of his career may be briefly recalled. After serving several years in the law offices of Mr Burns, solicitor, Dingwall, he proceeded to Glasgow and took classes preparatory to the regular law course of the University. Subsequently he entered an Edinburgh agent’s office, and pursued his studies at Edinburgh University, and when war broke out these were all but completed. An old Territorial, well-remembered as drummer to the pipe band of the 4th Seaforths, he joined the Royal Scots at mobilisation, and was on the Western Front with his battalion in 1915, when he was recalled at the instance of Lt. Colonel George, of the Banffshire Gordons, who desired his services as an officer. Obtaining commissioned rank, he became, successively, adjutant and captain, and did excellent work both in recruiting under the Derby scheme and in training men for the line.

Just before the spring push, Captain Moodie was given a staff appointment, and subsequently went to France, where he temporarily rejoined his unit. It was in his first engagement as an officer that he fell leading his men. A young man of high natural ability, unlimited push, and of strong character in the pursuit of his work, whatever it might be, he was pleasant and popular; a loyal son and a staunch friend.

Private Clement Theodore Moodie, the third son, is a Cameron Highlander. A baker to trade, he joined the Camerons at Kilmacolm, Glasgow, where he was employed, as soon as Kitchener’s call was public. Wounded five times and gassed twice, he has been in the thick of the fighting on the Western front. At present he is stationed at the reserve centre of his regiment somewhere in the North.
Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs Moodie, belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery, having joined this unit while stationed in Inverness, where he was employed before the war in Rose Street Foundry. He went East early in the war, where his unit has done magnificent work. Injured in the knee by a kick from a horse, he returned to England, where at present he is with the details of his unit.

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie, the youngest son with the colours, is attached to the Gordons. Not yet 19 years, he is at a training reserve centre somewhere on the East Coast.

See entries above and below for the five brothers in the Moodie family

Photo: #6420

Moodie Edwin C, Gunner, Munlochy

Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Moodie
First Name(s): Edwin Charles
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery
Home Address: Drumderfit Farm, Munlochy

FIVE SOLDIER SONS OF A ROSS-SHIRE FARMER

Photographs are reproduced to-day of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Henry Moodie, Drumderfit, Munlochy, and formerly of Dingwall. The parents of these gallant lads, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice, are well-known in Ross-shire. Before taking up the large farm of Drumderfit, Mr Moodie conducted a large and successful business in Dingwall, building up a trade with widespread ramifications all over the country. In the community Mr and Mrs Moodie have been held in high esteem, and at the moment they have the deep sympathy of the community in the loss of their second son, Captain Ralph W. Moodie, Gordons, which makes the first real break in a large family of sons.

Private Andrew Moodie, South Africans [obliterated] the father, is a baker to trade. He went out to South Africa five years ago, and was employed at Sabie and Johannesburg, and when war broke out he answered the call of Empire and joined Botha’s forces. After sharing in the earlier part of the campaign, he came [obliterated] with the first African contingent, and saw much fighting on the Western Front. Meantime he is in hospital suffering from injuries received under fire, and it is possible [remainder obliterated]

…….. recently reported. The facts of his career may be briefly recalled. After serving several years in the law offices of Mr Burns, solicitor, Dingwall, he proceeded to Glasgow and took classes preparatory to the regular law course of the University. Subsequently he entered an Edinburgh agent’s office, and pursued his studies at Edinburgh University, and when war broke out these were all but completed. An old Territorial, well-remembered as drummer to the pipe band of the 4th Seaforths, he joined the Royal Scots at mobilisation, and was on the Western Front with his battalion in 1915, when he was recalled at the instance of Lt. Colonel George, of the Banffshire Gordons, who desired his services as an officer. Obtaining commissioned rank, he became, successively, adjutant and captain, and did excellent work both in recruiting under the Derby scheme and in training men for the line.

Just before the spring push, Captain Moodie was given a staff appointment, and subsequently went to France, where he temporarily rejoined his unit. It was in his first engagement as an officer that he fell leading his men. A young man of high natural ability, unlimited push, and of strong character in the pursuit of his work, whatever it might be, he was pleasant and popular; a loyal son and a staunch friend.

Private Clement Theodore Moodie, the third son, is a Cameron Highlander. A baker to trade, he joined the Camerons at Kilmacolm, Glasgow, where he was employed, as soon as Kitchener’s call was public. Wounded five times and gassed twice, he has been in the thick of the fighting on the Western front. At present he is stationed at the reserve centre of his regiment somewhere in the North.
Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs Moodie, belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery, having joined this unit while stationed in Inverness, where he was employed before the war in Rose Street Foundry. He went East early in the war, where his unit has done magnificent work. Injured in the knee by a kick from a horse, he returned to England, where at present he is with the details of his unit.

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie, the youngest son with the colours, is attached to the Gordons. Not yet 19 years, he is at a training reserve centre somewhere on the East Coast.

See entries above and below for the five brothers in the Moodie family

Photo: #6418

Moodie Ralph, Capt, Munlochy

Captain Ralph Moodie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Moodie
First Name(s): Ralph
Rank: Captain
Regiment: Royal Scots / Gordons
Home Address: Drumderfit Farm, Munlochy

FIVE SOLDIER SONS OF A ROSS-SHIRE FARMER

Photographs are reproduced to-day of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Henry Moodie, Drumderfit, Munlochy, and formerly of Dingwall. The parents of these gallant lads, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice, are well-known in Ross-shire. Before taking up the large farm of Drumderfit, Mr Moodie conducted a large and successful business in Dingwall, building up a trade with widespread ramifications all over the country. In the community Mr and Mrs Moodie have been held in high esteem, and at the moment they have the deep sympathy of the community in the loss of their second son, Captain Ralph W. Moodie, Gordons, which makes the first real break in a large family of sons.

Private Andrew Moodie, South Africans [obliterated] the father, is a baker to trade. He went out to South Africa five years ago, and was employed at Sabie and Johannesburg, and when war broke out he answered the call of Empire and joined Botha’s forces. After sharing in the earlier part of the campaign, he came [obliterated] with the first African contingent, and saw much fighting on the Western Front. Meantime he is in hospital suffering from injuries received under fire, and it is possible [remainder obliterated]

…….. recently reported. The facts of his career may be briefly recalled. After serving several years in the law offices of Mr Burns, solicitor, Dingwall, he proceeded to Glasgow and took classes preparatory to the regular law course of the University. Subsequently he entered an Edinburgh agent’s office, and pursued his studies at Edinburgh University, and when war broke out these were all but completed. An old Territorial, well-remembered as drummer to the pipe band of the 4th Seaforths, he joined the Royal Scots at mobilisation, and was on the Western Front with his battalion in 1915, when he was recalled at the instance of Lt. Colonel George, of the Banffshire Gordons, who desired his services as an officer. Obtaining commissioned rank, he became, successively, adjutant and captain, and did excellent work both in recruiting under the Derby scheme and in training men for the line.

Just before the spring push, Captain Moodie was given a staff appointment, and subsequently went to France, where he temporarily rejoined his unit. It was in his first engagement as an officer that he fell leading his men. A young man of high natural ability, unlimited push, and of strong character in the pursuit of his work, whatever it might be, he was pleasant and popular; a loyal son and a staunch friend.

Private Clement Theodore Moodie, the third son, is a Cameron Highlander. A baker to trade, he joined the Camerons at Kilmacolm, Glasgow, where he was employed, as soon as Kitchener’s call was public. Wounded five times and gassed twice, he has been in the thick of the fighting on the Western front. At present he is stationed at the reserve centre of his regiment somewhere in the North.
Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs Moodie, belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery, having joined this unit while stationed in Inverness, where he was employed before the war in Rose Street Foundry. He went East early in the war, where his unit has done magnificent work. Injured in the knee by a kick from a horse, he returned to England, where at present he is with the details of his unit.

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie, the youngest son with the colours, is attached to the Gordons. Not yet 19 years, he is at a training reserve centre somewhere on the East Coast.

See entries above and below for the five brothers in the Moodie family

Photo: #6430

Moodie Stanley G, Pte, Munlochy

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie

Date of Paper: 13.07.1917
Surname: Moodie
First Name(s): Stanley Gordon
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: formerly Drumderfit Farm, Munlochy

FIVE SOLDIER SONS OF A ROSS-SHIRE FARMER

Photographs are reproduced to-day of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Henry Moodie, Drumderfit, Munlochy, and formerly of Dingwall. The parents of these gallant lads, one of whom has made the supreme sacrifice, are well-known in Ross-shire. Before taking up the large farm of Drumderfit, Mr Moodie conducted a large and successful business in Dingwall, building up a trade with widespread ramifications all over the country. In the community Mr and Mrs Moodie have been held in high esteem, and at the moment they have the deep sympathy of the community in the loss of their second son, Captain Ralph W. Moodie, Gordons, which makes the first real break in a large family of sons.

Private Andrew Moodie, South Africans [obliterated] the father, is a baker to trade. He went out to South Africa five years ago, and was employed at Sabie and Johannesburg, and when war broke out he answered the call of Empire and joined Botha’s forces. After sharing in the earlier part of the campaign, he came [obliterated] with the first African contingent, and saw much fighting on the Western Front. Meantime he is in hospital suffering from injuries received under fire, and it is possible [remainder obliterated]

…….. recently reported. The facts of his career may be briefly recalled. After serving several years in the law offices of Mr Burns, solicitor, Dingwall, he proceeded to Glasgow and took classes preparatory to the regular law course of the University. Subsequently he entered an Edinburgh agent’s office, and pursued his studies at Edinburgh University, and when war broke out these were all but completed. An old Territorial, well-remembered as drummer to the pipe band of the 4th Seaforths, he joined the Royal Scots at mobilisation, and was on the Western Front with his battalion in 1915, when he was recalled at the instance of Lt. Colonel George, of the Banffshire Gordons, who desired his services as an officer. Obtaining commissioned rank, he became, successively, adjutant and captain, and did excellent work both in recruiting under the Derby scheme and in training men for the line.

Just before the spring push, Captain Moodie was given a staff appointment, and subsequently went to France, where he temporarily rejoined his unit. It was in his first engagement as an officer that he fell leading his men. A young man of high natural ability, unlimited push, and of strong character in the pursuit of his work, whatever it might be, he was pleasant and popular; a loyal son and a staunch friend.

Private Clement Theodore Moodie, the third son, is a Cameron Highlander. A baker to trade, he joined the Camerons at Kilmacolm, Glasgow, where he was employed, as soon as Kitchener’s call was public. Wounded five times and gassed twice, he has been in the thick of the fighting on the Western front. At present he is stationed at the reserve centre of his regiment somewhere in the North.
Gunner Edwin Charles Moodie, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs Moodie, belongs to the Royal Horse Artillery, having joined this unit while stationed in Inverness, where he was employed before the war in Rose Street Foundry. He went East early in the war, where his unit has done magnificent work. Injured in the knee by a kick from a horse, he returned to England, where at present he is with the details of his unit.

Private Stanley Gordon Moodie, the youngest son with the colours, is attached to the Gordons. Not yet 19 years, he is at a training reserve centre somewhere on the East Coast.

See entries above for the five brothers in the Moodie family

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