Ferintosh WW I page 1

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Photo: #5950

Allison David J, Pte, Culbokie

Private David John Allison

Date of Paper: 01.12.1916
Surname: Allison
First Name(s): David John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Braefindon, Culbokie

Private David John Allison (40081), Seaforths, who died of wounds on 23rd October, was the adopted son of Mr and Mrs D. Allison, Braefindon, Culbokie. Deceased was 19 years at the time of his death. Previous to enlistment at the outbreak of war he was employed as a farm servant with Mr Maclennan, Rootfield, to whom he gave the utmost satisfaction. After enlisting, he was for some time at Bedford, where, after an attack of measles, and his life was almost despaired of, he was passed for home defence, and during his period of training at various camps he qualified in signalling, bomb-throwing, sniping, etc. He could put his hand to any kind of work, and while at Shorncliffe went through a course of carpenter work. He was a most likeable lad, and very popular with his comrades. The deepest sympathy is felt for his foster parents.

Under date 24th October, the nurse in the hospital in France writes: “I am sorry to have to send you the saddest news of your son, Pte. D. J. Allison. He was brought into 2/2 London Casualty Clearing Station last night badly wounded in the abdomen. He was unconscious, and passed away just after he came in. I am sorry to have to send you such distressing news of him.”

A comrade writes: “I saw him going up in front of me that day. We were advancing through a ruined village when he got wounded along with some others. I couldnít tell whether he was badly wounded or not, as I had to go ahead. I am certain, however, that everything possible would be done for him, as the stretcher-bearers were there at once. It was a shell that exploded near him that knocked him out. Please accept my sincerest sympathy in your sad loss.”

In his last letter home Pte. Allison wrote: “Just a note to let you know I am quite well, hoping you are the same. Well, I have got a good taste of Fritzís shell fire now, and I’m telling you it ís not a treat. I am wondering how I never got hit, for I was buried twice by high explosive shells.”

Photo: #5947

Bethune Murdo, Piper, Culbokie

Piper Murdo Bethune

Date of Paper: 11.08.1916
Surname: Bethune
First Name(s): Murdo
Rank: Piper
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: Badrain, Culbokie

BLACK ISLE ROYAL SCOTS DEATH

Mrs Bethune, Badrain, Culbokie, Conon Bridge, has received information from the officer commanding that her son, Piper Murdo Bethune, Royal Scots, was severely wounded in action on 2nd July,1916, and died of his wounds in hospital. Captain W. B. Robertson, Royal Scots, in a letter to Piper Bethune’s wife, who with her two children resides meantime in Glasgow with her brother-in-law’s family, says: “It is with sincere regret that I write to inform you of your husband’s death. He took part in the great battle which now is – thanks to the self-sacrifice of so many – establishing our superiority over the enemy. In modern warfare there is little room for the fighting, but urgent need for carrying soldiers whose job is to follow closely on assaulting troops and to deliver at the furthest points reached, in the shortest possible time, stores of material, rations, water, etc. This is the great work your husband was doing – work which was done in face of danger, without the glamour and excitement which helps assaulting troops when in pursuit or contact with our unscrupulous enemy. Your husband was shot in the side and taken to hospital by a fellow piper. Unfortunately I have received word, not officially but thoroughly reliable, that his wounds proved fatal. Please accept my sincere sympathy and that of my brother officers in this your great loss. Pte. Bethune has helped to ensure a very high reputation for the battalion he joined. He was hit by machine gun fire, and when wounded his message was to you.”

Subsequently Mrs Bethune received official confirmation of the death of her husband as described. A letter from Piper Philip to the widow is eloquent of a soldier’s sympathy. Piper Bethune’s grave will be carefully tended.

Piper Bethune was an old Seaforth, and when war broke out he joined the Royal Scots. He went through the South African War with the 2nd Seaforths, and took part in the battle of Magersfontein. After the war he got his discharge, and returned to civil life. He joined the Royal Scots (Macrae’s Battalion), and, anxious to get back into the kilt, entered the band as a piper.

He is one of three sons of Mrs Bethune, Badrain, Culbokie, on service. Wm. Bethune is a driver in a machine gun company, and Mr Harry Bethune is first engineer on a Government transport.
The deepest sympathy is felt with Mrs Bethune and family and also with the bereaved widow of the deceased and her two young children.

A portrait of Piper Bethune appears in today’s paper.

Photo: #5951

Cross Duncan, Pte, Culbokie

Private Duncan Cross

Date of Paper: 07.07.[?]
Surname: Cross
First Name(s): Duncan
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1st Canadians / Winnipeg Rifles
Home Address: Culbokie

TWO CULBOKIE SOLDIERS

Two brothers hailing from Culbokie, Pte. Duncan Cross, 1st Canadians, and Pte. Hector Cross, 6th Camerons, are doing their bit. Their photos appear to-day.

Private Duncan Cross was employed in Winnipeg, and on the outbreak of war, he at once responded to the call of the motherland, and was one of the first to join the Winnipeg Rifles. After some months training he crossed to England in November, 1914, and from here he went to France in the February of the following year. Since then he has come unscathed through the various battles which have made the Canadians famous, including St Julien. He is in the grenade coy. of his regiment.

Private Hector Cross is an observer in the 6th Cameron Highlanders, which regiment he joined in October, 1914. After a period of training in various camps in England, he took part in the battle of Loos, and received a shrapnel wound in the side. Fortunately it did not prove serious, and, after having his injuries dressed, he again rejoined the coy., and took part in the famous stand of the 6th Camerons at Hill 70.

Prior to the war Pte. Cross was employed with Mr John Munro, contractor, Kirkhill.

See entry below for details of his brother Hector Cross

Photo: #5952

Cross Hector, Pte, Culbokie

Private Hector Cross

Date of Paper: 07.07.[?]
Surname: Cross
First Name(s): Hector
Rank: Private
Regiment: 6th Camerons
Home Address: Culbokie

TWO CULBOKIE SOLDIERS

Two brothers hailing from Culbokie, Pte. Duncan Cross, 1st Canadians, and Pte. Hector Cross, 6th Camerons, are doing their bit. Their photos appear to-day.

Private Duncan Cross was employed in Winnipeg, and on the outbreak of war, he at once responded to the call of the motherland, and was one of the first to join the Winnipeg Rifles. After some months training he crossed to England in November, 1914, and from here he went to France in the February of the following year. Since then he has come unscathed through the various battles which have made the Canadians famous, including St Julien. He is in the grenade coy. of his regiment.

Private Hector Cross is an observer in the 6th Cameron Highlanders, which regiment he joined in October, 1914. After a period of training in various camps in England, he took part in the battle of Loos, and received a shrapnel wound in the side. Fortunately it did not prove serious, and, after having his injuries dressed, he again rejoined the coy., and took part in the famous stand of the 6th Camerons at Hill 70.

Prior to the war Pte. Cross was employed with Mr John Munro, contractor, Kirkhill.

See entry above for details of his brother Duncan Cross

Photo: #5953

Dingwall John, Pte, Culbokie

Private John Dingwall

Date of Paper: 26.03.1920
Surname: Dingwall
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Culbokie, Conon

Much regret was expressed throughout the whole district when it became known that John, the youngest son of Mr and Mrs Donald Dingwall, Culbokie, had passed away at the early age of 24 years. As the result of his hardships while training for the army his health broke down, and after coming home he suffered much from the effects of pleurisy which he had previously contracted. He gave evidence (says one who knew deceased well) of being a God-fearing young man and his gentle and cheery disposition made him much liked by all his acquaintances. In his severe illness he maintained the utmost patience, and appeared perfectly resigned to the Almighty’s Will concerning him.

The funeral to Dingwall Churchyard was very largely attended. The Rev. D. Munro and the Rev. J. Sellar, Ferintosh, conducted the service at the house, while the Rev. J. R. Macpherson, Dingwall, officiated at the grave. Much sympathy has been extended to Mr and Mrs Dingwall and family in their sore and sad bereavement.

The deceased, S/27414 Private John Dingwall, joined the 3rd Seaforth Highlanders at Cromarty on 7th June, 1918. About a month after he joined he contracted pleurisy and was discharged from the Army on 18th September, 1918, as no longer physically fit for war service.

Photo: #5949

Ellison Alexander, Pte, Culbokie

Private Alexander Ellison

Date of Paper: 03.05.1917
Surname: Ellison
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Mounteagle, Culbokie.

There is reproduced to-day a photo of Alexander Ellison, Ross-shire Seaforths, Mounteagle, Colbokie, who, as already reported, died at a Casualty Clearing Station of wounds received in action on 24th March last in the great offensive on the British front.

Pte Ellison (who was 20 years of age last February), was only 16-1/2 years at the time of mobilisation in August, 1914, and thus gave evidence of his patriotic spirit by responding to his country’s call at the commencement of the war, and bearing his full share of the grim fighting that was reflected so much honour on his heroic battalion.

His elder brother, Charles, who joined a Canadian Contingent, also saw much fighting in France, and having been severely wounded, he has now returned invalided to Canada. Much sympathy is extended to all the relatives, very specially to the sorrowing mother in her sore bereavement.

See entry below for details of his brother Charles Ellison

No photo available

Private Charles Ellison

Date of Paper: 03.05.1917
Surname: Ellison
First Name(s): Charles
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Mounteagle, Culbokie.

There is reproduced to-day a photo of Alexander Ellison, Ross-shire Seaforths, Mounteagle, Colbokie, who, as already reported, died at a Casualty Clearing Station of wounds received in action on 24th March last in the great offensive on the British front.

Pte Ellison (who was 20 years of age last February), was only 16-1/2 years at the time of mobilisation in August, 1914, and thus gave evidence of his patriotic spirit by responding to his country’s call at the commencement of the war, and bearing his full share of the grim fighting that was reflected so much honour on his heroic battalion.

His elder brother, Charles, who joined a Canadian Contingent, also saw much fighting in France, and having been severely wounded, he has now returned invalided to Canada. Much sympathy is extended to all the relatives, very specially to the sorrowing mother in her sore bereavement.

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Ellison

No photo available

Private John Fowler

Date of Paper: 10.11.1916
Surname: Fowler
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 3rd Seaforths
Home Address: Knocknasannoch, Culbokie

TWO CULBOKIE BOYS WITH THE COLOURS

Above we reproduce the photographs of two sons of Mr and Mrs Wm. Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie. 1609 Sergt. Wm. Fowler, 1/4th Seaforths, was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March 1915. He has made a good recovery, and is now back with his regiment. In his 24th year, previous to the war he was a gamekeeper with Mr Duncan Davidson of Tulloch. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914. The elder son, 10870 Private John Fowler, is with the 3rd Seaforths, but, so far, has not crossed the Channel. He is 29 year of age, and always worked the croft at home for his parents.

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916

We reproduce today a photograph of Pte. John Fowler, Seaforths, who, as was intimated last week, has been killed in action. A son of Mr Wm. Fowler and Mrs Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie, he was 29 years of age, and attested under the Derby scheme.

He was a typical young Highlander, and was much esteemed, both for his own and his parents sake, throughout the district. Previous to the war deceased always worked on the farm with his parents.

See entry below for details of his brother John Fowler

No photo available

Sergeant William Fowler

Date of Paper: 10.11.1916 and 08.12.1916
Surname: Fowler
First Name(s): William
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Knocknasannoch, Culbokie

TWO CULBOKIE BOYS WITH THE COLOURS

Above we reproduce the photographs of two sons of Mr and Mrs Wm. Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie. 1609 Sergt. Wm. Fowler, 1/4th Seaforths, was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March 1915. He has made a good recovery, and is now back with his regiment. In his 24th year, previous to the war he was a gamekeeper with Mr Duncan Davidson of Tulloch. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914. The elder son, 10870 Private John Fowler, is with the 3rd Seaforths, but, so far, has not crossed the Channel. He is 29 year of age, and always worked the croft at home for his parents.

Date of Paper: 08.12.1916

We reproduce today a photograph of Pte. John Fowler, Seaforths, who, as was intimated last week, has been killed in action. A son of Mr Wm. Fowler and Mrs Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie, he was 29 years of age, and attested under the Derby scheme.

He was a typical young Highlander, and was much esteemed, both for his own and his parents sake, throughout the district. Previous to the war deceased always worked on the farm with his parents.

See entry above for details of his brother John Fowler