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Photo: #5955

Fraser John, Pte, Culbokie

Private John Fraser

Date of Paper: 18.04.1919
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: 4th Seaforths
Home Address: Culbokie

THE LATE PTE. JOHN FRASER, CULBOKIE

Today is reproduced the photograph of Private John Fraser, 4th Seaforths, Culbokie. He went out with the 4th Seaforths in 1914, and was attached to the transport section, where he served until he took ill. He was expected home on demobilisation leave, but contracted influenza, followed by pneumonia, and died in hospital in France on February 12th.

Of a quiet and unassuming disposition, his friends in Culbokie mourn the death, at the early age of 30 years, of one who has done his bit well in the service of his country. Deceased was employed in civil life with Messrs Jack, farmers, Balmeanach, who always found him a capable and willing servant, whose place will not easily be filled.

A brother of the deceased soldier has served in the R.G.A. since the early days of the war.

Photo: #7129

Macdonald Murdo, Corpl

Corporal Murdo McK. Macdonald

Date of Paper: 03.11.1916
Surname: Macdonald
First Name(s): Murdo McK.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Rose Cottage, Duncanston, Ferintosh

THE LATE CORPL. M. MACDONALD, FERINTOSH

150254 Corporal Murdo McK. Macdonald, Canadians, killed on 26th September, was in his 31st year, and was the son of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Duncanston, Ferintosh, and was unmarried. A draper to trade, he served his apprenticeship with the late George Urquhart, Dingwall, thereafter proceeding to Elgin, and then, like so many ambitious young men, sailed to Canada. A good shot and an ardent volunteer while in Ross shire, he joined the Canadian Forces, and came over to this country with one of the contingents last year to complete his training, and in March of this year proceeded to France, where he was promoted Corporal on the field.

A pathetic circumstance in his case was that deceased expected leave home any day, and his family was hourly awaiting him. He was of a most hard-working, honest, and loveable type, and the sincerest sympathy of all who knew him is felt for his sorrowing parents and their family, who reside at Rose Cottage, Duncanston, Ferintosh.

A portrait of Corporal Macdonald appears today.

Photo: #6189

Mackenzie J P, Pte, Ferintosh

Private J. P. Mackenzie

Date of Paper: 30.08.1918
Surname: Mackenzie
First Name(s): J. P.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Gordons
Home Address: Newton of Ferintosh, Conon Bridge

THE LATE J. P. MACKENZIE, FERINTOSH

News has been received by Mrs Mackenzie, Newton of Ferintosh, Muir of Ord, that her eldest son, Pte. J. P. Mackenzie, 18 years, Gordons, died of wounds at 48 Casualty Clearing Station on 28th July. Pte. Mackenzie, before he went to France in April last, was serving his apprenticeship with Mr Henderson, ironmonger, Dingwall, where he was employed for 2 years. His death is deeply regretted by all who knew him. His father has been on active service since the commencement of the war. A photograph appears today.

Photo: #5917

Macleod Kenneth, Pte, Canada ex Conon

Private Kenneth Macleod

Date of Paper: 07.07.1916
Surname: Macleod
First Name(s): Kenneth
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadian Contingent
Home Address: Broomhill, Ferintosh, Conon

FERINTOSH CANADIAN KILLED

Mr and Mrs Macleod, Broomhill, Ferintosh, have received intimation that their son, Private Kenneth Macleod, Canadian Contingent, has been killed. Pte. Macleod, whose photo appears today, was a bright young lad, as plucky as he was promising, and his many companions regret his early death, and there will be much sympathy for his relatives. He went to Canada to seek his fortunes about five years ago, and was employed with a land surveying firm when he heard and answered the call to arms. While in training in England he visited his home at Broomhill, and his friends in Dingwall, Maryburgh and Conon, where he was well and popularly known. He went on active service some months ago, taking part in much fighting, and escaping scathless until he met his death on the field of honour, sacrificing his young life for a great cause. Much sympathy is felt for his parents in their loss.

Photo: #6309

Macrae A T Waters, 2 Lieut, Kinbeachie

Second Lieutenant A. T. Watters Macrae

Paper: 18.08.1916
Surname: Macrae
First Name(s): A. T. Watters
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address: Kinbeachie, Conon Bridge

KINBEACHIE SEAFORTH OFFICER WOUNDED

Second-Lieut. A. T. Watters Macrae, Seaforth Highlanders (wounded), is the second son of the Rev. D. M. Macrae, Kinbeachie. He was educated at George Watson’s College, and before receiving his commission was studying medicine at Edinburgh University. He has two brothers serving, one in the 2/4th Seaforth Highlanders, and the other in the 8th Camerons.
A portrait of Lieut. Macrae appears today.

Photo: #6188

Ross Andrew, Pte, Ferintosh

Private Andrew Ross

Date of Paper: 11.05.1917
Surname: Ross
First Name(s): Andrew
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Ferintosh, Conon Bridge

PRIVATE A. ROSS, SEAFORTHS

Private Andrew Ross, Seaforths, Ferintosh, was wounded in action on the 9th April, and has now reached the Montague Hospital, 2 Ward, Mexboro, Yorkshire. In a letter home he says that he was pretty badly hit this time. The bullet went through below the jaw, touching the bone, and passed down through the arm. Able to be up, but unable to eat solid food (the teeth in his lower jaw are broken), Pte. Ross is in excellent spirits, and feels he is making progress. He went out with his battalion in 1914, and, wounded at Neuve Chapelle, has seen much fighting since. Pte. Ross, who is about 35 years of age, is married, his wife with three children residing at Ferintosh, and his parents, Mr and Mrs William Ross, reside at Woodbine Cottage, Maryburgh.

A photograph appears to-day.

Photo: #5948

Simpson Alexander D, Pte, Culbokie

Private Alexander Daniel Simpson

Date of paper: 16.11.1917
Surname: Simpson
First Name(s): Alexander Daniel
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Findon Pier Cottage, Culbokie

Pte. Alexander Daniel Simpson, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Simpson, Findon Pier Cottage, Culbokie, was killed in action in France in October last. Today his photograph and that of his brother, Pte. Murdo Simpson, Seaforths, is reproduced.

Pte. A. D. Simpson was a well-known shorthorn herdsman. He had a great fancy for the breed and his experience was broad and his knowledge of much intrinsic value. First under herdsman with the late Mr Colin M. Cameron, Balnakyle, he was appointed chief herdsman to the famous Millhills herd belonging to Mr Stewart, Crieff, and served there for four years. Subsequently he took over the management of the famous English herd at Grange, where he was employed when war broke out. His figure was a well-known one in the best showyards and sale rings. He was known to most of the best shorthorn breeders, and was a popular personality among herdsmen, among whom he supported wholeheartedly that splendid cameraderie which distinguishes the whole company of fanciers of the breed. Pte. Simpson answered the call to arms with alacrity, joining his own county Territorial battalion. He was a 1914 man, going to France with his unit in November. He took part in the memorable battle of Neuve Chapelle, where he was wounded, like many others, with shrapnel in the head. His escape was miraculous and for a time life was held by a slender cord. At a base hospital an operation resulted in a large piece of shrapnel being taken from the head. One portion of shrapnel still remained, which was too near the brain to be removed. With the best of skilled nursing, the wound healed and he did not seem to suffer. He returned to Scotland, and after a considerable convalescence in Aberdeen he was, largely on his own pressing importunity, discharged fit and returned to his regiment. Always an officer’s servant, two of his superiors lost their lives, and he himself fell in action just when he was posted, on 8th October, for his first leave for two years. Everybody speaks kindly of him, and if the sanctity of the home and the domestic circle were invaded it would reveal that the splendid type of character which was exemplified in his common actions was founded on his deep personal affections for his home and his splendid and abiding interest in all that made for the happiness and comfort of all people, to whom and to the family goes out the deepest sympathy.

Pte Murdoch Simpson, Seaforths, a younger brother, whose photo, as stated, is also reproduced, has served with a line battalion in France. In April, 1915, he suffered from shell shock, and was sent to England. Recovering, he returned to the line, and after sharing in the heavy fighting in which his battalion has participated he was severely wounded in July last, his left arm being shattered at the shoulder. Happily, he is making good progress in an English hospital.

See entry below for details of his brother Murdoch Simpson

Photo: #5957

Simpson Murdoch, Pte, Culbokie

Private Murdoch Simpson

Date of paper: 16.11.17
Surname: Simpson
First Name(s): Murdoch
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Findon Pier Cottage, Culbokie

Pte. Alexander Daniel Simpson, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Simpson, Findon Pier Cottage, Culbokie, was killed in action in France in October last. Today his photograph and that of his brother, Pte. Murdo Simpson, Seaforths, is reproduced.

Pte. A. D. Simpson was a well-known shorthorn herdsman. He had a great fancy for the breed and his experience was broad and his knowledge of much intrinsic value. First under herdsman with the late Mr Colin M. Cameron, Balnakyle, he was appointed chief herdsman to the famous Millhills herd belonging to Mr Stewart, Crieff, and served there for four years. Subsequently he took over the management of the famous English herd at Grange, where he was employed when war broke out. His figure was a well-known one in the best showyards and sale rings. He was known to most of the best shorthorn breeders, and was a popular personality among herdsmen, among whom he supported wholeheartedly that splendid cameraderie which distinguishes the whole company of fanciers of the breed. Pte. Simpson answered the call to arms with alacrity, joining his own county Territorial battalion. He was a 1914 man, going to France with his unit in November. He took part in the memorable battle of Neuve Chapelle, where he was wounded, like many others, with shrapnel in the head. His escape was miraculous and for a time life was held by a slender cord. At a base hospital an operation resulted in a large piece of shrapnel being taken from the head. One portion of shrapnel still remained, which was too near the brain to be removed. With the best of skilled nursing, the wound healed and he did not seem to suffer. He returned to Scotland, and after a considerable convalescence in Aberdeen he was, largely on his own pressing importunity, discharged fit and returned to his regiment. Always an officer’s servant, two of his superiors lost their lives, and he himself fell in action just when he was posted, on 8th October, for his first leave for two years. Everybody speaks kindly of him, and if the sanctity of the home and the domestic circle were invaded it would reveal that the splendid type of character which was exemplified in his common actions was founded on his deep personal affections for his home and his splendid and abiding interest in all that made for the happiness and comfort of all people, to whom and to the family goes out the deepest sympathy.

Pte Murdoch Simpson, Seaforths, a younger brother, whose photo, as stated, is also reproduced, has served with a line battalion in France. In April, 1915, he suffered from shell shock, and was sent to England. Recovering, he returned to the line, and after sharing in the heavy fighting in which his battalion has participated he was severely wounded in July last, his left arm being shattered at the shoulder. Happily, he is making good progress in an English hospital.

See entry above for details of his brother Alexander Daniel Simpson

Photo: #5956

Tollins John, Pte, Glasgow connections to Culbokie

Private John Tollins

CULBOKIE – photo def in Ferintosh album
Date of Paper: 09.08.1918
Surname: Tollins
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Royal Scots
Home Address: 15, Cramond Street, Glasgow

ROYAL SCOT KILLED

Pte. John Tollins, Royal Scots, who has been posted as missing on August 1st 1917, is now reported to have died on that date. Before enlisting in June 1916, he was employed by Messrs James Ferrier & Son, explosive agents, at 82 Mitchell Street, Glasgow. He leaves a widow and three young children, who reside at 15 Cramond Street, Glasgow. Pte. Tollins was a son-in-law of Mr and Mrs Donald Simpson, Culbokie, Ross-shire. A photo of deceased appears to-day.