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Photo: #5915

Munro Ivy, Pte, Conon

Private Ivy Munro

Date of Paper: 25.02.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): Ivy
Rank: Private
Regiment: H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge

Killed 28-7-1916
Mr and Mrs Munro, Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge, have three sons serving with the colours, whose photographs appear on this page.

No. 427 Driver John Munro, Royal Horse Artillery, is stationed in England. He enlisted in October 1915, previous to which he was employed at Conon Brae.

No. 1887 Corporal William Munro is a member of H (Brahan) Coy., 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders. Previous to the war he was a draper, and was in the employment of Messrs Macdonald Ltd., Buchanan Street, Glasgow. On mobilisation taking place he immediately returned home and joined the Brahan Company. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914, and has been through every engagement with his company, and has not yet received a scratch.

No. 1683 Private Ivy Munro also belongs to H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths, but has not been so fortunate as his brother William, being slightly wounded by a piece of shell on May 31st, 1915. He was soon able to return to duty, and at Christmas he was home on short leave in the best of health. He is a gardener to trade at Conon Gardens, and he answered the call in August 1914, since when he has been with the battalion, with the exception of the short period when he was wounded.

See records below for details of his brothers John and William

Photo: #5904

Munro John, Driver, Conon

Driver John Munro

Date of Paper: 25.02.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): John
Rank: Driver
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery
Home Address: Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge

Killed 28-7-1916
Mr and Mrs Munro, Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge, have three sons serving with the colours, whose photographs appear on this page.

No. 427 Driver John Munro, Royal Horse Artillery, is stationed in England. He enlisted in October 1915, previous to which he was employed at Conon Brae.

No. 1887 Corporal William Munro is a member of H (Brahan) Coy., 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders. Previous to the war he was a draper, and was in the employment of Messrs Macdonald Ltd., Buchanan Street, Glasgow. On mobilisation taking place he immediately returned home and joined the Brahan Company. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914, and has been through every engagement with his company, and has not yet received a scratch.

No. 1683 Private Ivy Munro also belongs to H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths, but has not been so fortunate as his brother William, being slightly wounded by a piece of shell on May 31st, 1915. He was soon able to return to duty, and at Christmas he was home on short leave in the best of health. He is a gardener to trade at Conon Gardens, and he answered the call in August 1914, since when he has been with the battalion, with the exception of the short period when he was wounded.

See details of his brother Ivy above and William below

Photo: #5900

Munro Willliam, Corp, Conon

Corporal William Munro

Date of Paper: 25.02.1916
Surname: Munro
First Name(s): William
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge

Killed 28-7-1916
Mr and Mrs Munro, Hill Cottage, Conon Bridge, have three sons serving with the colours, whose photographs appear on this page.

No. 427 Driver John Munro, Royal Horse Artillery, is stationed in England. He enlisted in October 1915, previous to which he was employed at Conon Brae.

No. 1887 Corporal William Munro is a member of H (Brahan) Coy., 1/4th Seaforth Highlanders. Previous to the war he was a draper, and was in the employment of Messrs Macdonald Ltd., Buchanan Street, Glasgow. On mobilisation taking place he immediately returned home and joined the Brahan Company. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914, and has been through every engagement with his company, and has not yet received a scratch.

No. 1683 Private Ivy Munro also belongs to H (Brahan) Company, 1/4th Seaforths, but has not been so fortunate as his brother William, being slightly wounded by a piece of shell on May 31st, 1915. He was soon able to return to duty, and at Christmas he was home on short leave in the best of health. He is a gardener to trade at Conon Gardens, and he answered the call in August 1914, since when he has been with the battalion, with the exception of the short period when he was wounded.

See details of his brothers Ivy and John above

Photo: #5919

Noble Thomas, Pte, Conon

Private Thomas Noble

Date of Paper: 05.10.1917
Surname: Noble
First Name(s): Thomas
Rank: Private
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Canada (formerly Balloan, Conon Bridge)

There is reproduced today a photograph of Private Thomas Noble, Canadians, who, as already reported, was killed in action in France on 15th August last. The son of Mr and Mrs Noble, Balloan, Conon Bridge, before going to Canada he was for six and a half years in the employment of Messrs Paterson & Co., coal merchants, Dingwall, and was much respected in the town and district. A fine, promising young man – he was 29 years of age – his death is much regretted, and deep sympathy is felt with the family.

Lt. Taylor, an officer of Pte. Noble’s company, in a letter to his father, says: “It is with very deep regret that I have to confirm the news of your son’s death. He was killed while advancing to the attack, being hit soon after leaving our own front line. Death was instantaneous and you will be happier to know that he did not suffer. Consolation is in the fact, Mr Noble, that he died doing his duty. No man can do more than this, and he has set us all a fine example to follow. In losing your son we have lost a good comrade and fine soldier, and the whole company join me in tendering to you their deepest sympathy in your great loss. Your son was buried with others near the spot where he fell. The grave will be well looked after, and you may be sure that whenever we are near the vicinity special attention will be given by us to do all that is possible in this respect. Assuring you once more, Mr Noble, of our deepest sympathy.”

Photo: #5893

Paterson W J, Cadet, Conon

Cadet W.J. Paterson

Date of Paper: 18.05.1917
Surname: Paterson
First Name(s): W. J.
Rank: Cadet
Regiment: Black Watch
Home Address: Rose Villa, Conon Bridge

Mr W. J. Paterson, Black Watch, is a brother of Mrs Munro, Rose Villa, Conon Bridge, and at the outbreak of the war was in West Africa. He served 18 months in France, was wounded, and received the Military Medal.

Photo: #5898

Urquhart John, Corp, Conon

Photo: #5897

Urquhart John, Corp, Conon

Corporal John Urquhart

Date of Paper: 31.08.1916
Surname: Urquhart
First Name(s): John
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Viewhill, Easter Kinkell, Conon Bridge

2324 Corporal John Urquhart, Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs John Urquhart, Viewhill, Easter Kinkell, died on 16th August from wounds recieved in France. Corporal Urquhart was 24 years of age, and previous to the war was a mason to trade, and was employed with Mr William Maclean, contractor, Dingwall. In September, 1914, he enlisted at Dingwall and proceeded to the front with his battalion in November of the same year. In March, 1915, he was invalided home with an attack of Measles, and returned to the front in the following May. From that time he was constantly with the battalion until he fell this month.

Corporal Urquhart was one of the best soldiers that ever joined the Seaforth Highlanders. Strong, capable, full of life and vigour, he was a splendid specimen of the sturdy Highlander. True as steel, courteous and obliging, he was the staunchest of friends. With both officers and men he was most popular and there is not a man in his company but regrets and mourns his loss.

A comrade writes: “Iit is hard to believe, for it is only a short time since I saw him in his usual form, cheery and happy. You must feel losing such a brave and dutiful son, but he has given all, and died a noble death, fighting for liberty, and now he rests in a soldier’s grave.”

Rev. J. Macleod, Chaplain to the Forces, in a letter of sympathy, writes that he officiated at the funeral on 16th August, and that as many of Corporal Urquhart’s comrades as could attend were present. “I was with him to the last. He wished me to write you, and to ask you not to worry. He did not suffer much, but it was obvious from the beginning that the end was not far off. In your loss and sorrow I hope it will be some comfort to you to know that your boy, in sacrificing his life for his country and the cause of righteousness and justice, did what all right thinking men should be prepared to do at this critical time. He did what he could. His officers and comrades speak well of him, and all regret his death.”

The sympathy of a wide circle of friends goes out to Mr and Mrs Urquhart and family in the loss they have sustained. He was a loving, faithful, and dutiful son.

Photo: #5891

French R Douglas, 2nd Lieut, London ex Conon

2nd Lieutenant R. Douglas French

Date of Paper: 01.12.1916
Surname: French
First Name(s): R. Douglas
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Regiment: London Regiment
Home Address: Moss Bank, North Finchley, London

LIEUT. R. DOUGLAS FRENCH, LONDON REGIMENT

2nd Lieutenant R. Douglas French, London Regiment, who was killed in action on September 15th whilst bravely leading his men, was the eldest son of Dr and Mrs French of Moss Bank, North Finchley, and a grandson of Mr Hay Mackenzie Macleay, Riverbank House, Conon Bridge. Eighteen years of age, he was educated at Epsom College, and a first year student at the London Hospital where he did much good work. He was in the O.T.C. London University, and in October 1915 got his commission in the London Regiment and went out to France in May 1916, spending most of his time in the trenches. He had a very strong sense of duty, and was always cheerful and bright. Writing to his true pal and old school fellow, Lieut Oates, he said: “This is my last letter before the great day, it is an experience of a lifetime, and one feels it is nice to be British, and be free. Those who have fallen and gone from this earth fighting for the old country are still in England. If you go out and see what a fine country we have and compare it with poor wounded France. And if they had not died we should not have it.”

His Colonel writes: “I can assure you of my great regret, for your son was a promising young soldier, and the battalion could ill spare him, and he fell in a most gallant assault in the German line.” The O.C. of his company wrote: “It is with the deepest regret I have to inform you of the death of your son in the great advance of the 15th inst. He died bravely leading his men, by whom he was much admired, which was shown by the fact that two men went through grave risks and even lost their lives in trying to save him. He was indeed a brave fellow, and we shall all miss him. Please accept my sincerest sympathy, and trust that the knowledge that he died like a man for his country may in some short measure lessen your great sorrow. His men write of him: “He was a true English gentleman, a great lover of England and duty, always thinking of others happiness, and to be anywhere near him was to know real happiness. A baby in years, but a man in heart and purpose, and he died a ‘real little hero’.”

Lieut. French was a keen sportsman, a lover of music, he played and sang well; and his love of home and his parents was very great. Everyone, old and young, rich and poor, loved Douglas, and he will be sadly missed.

The Rev the headmaster of Epsom College writes of him: “You know how I honoured your dear son. If a headmaster could have favourites Douglas would be among the first. If only I had such a boy myself. Shall I bid you hope. It is not needed, and if it is too late to hope in that way, what death could a boy die to match the glory and pride of such an hour. We have always been proud of him and his memory lives here, and will live. He cannot have any real regret unless you sorrow more than he could wish.”

Through the good work of the Red Cross Dr French has been able to interview some of the men who were present on the day of the battle, and who are now wounded, and in hospital, and they told him that Lieut. French was wounded, but as he was the only officer of the Company left to carry on, he had his wounds dressed, and said: “Boys, you all have mothers we must think of the women and children of England and go on and win. So come on, boys, let’s turn them out.” Whilst the objective was being taken Lieut. French was shot dead by machine gun fire.

Dr and Mrs French have had no official notice from the War Office, only that he is missing. It is through the British Red Cross, 18 Carlton House Terrace, SW, that they were able to get information, and for the benefit of others they would like it known the wonderful work that is being done by the British Red Cross and Order of St John. If anyone wishes to pay tribute to this little hero son, what he would wish would be for them to help the Red Cross with funds for their most noble work.

A photo of 2/Lieut. French appears today.

Photo: #5899

Macdonald Murdo M, Corp, Conon

Corporal Murdo M Macdonald

 

 

 

 

No details available for Corporal Macdonald