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Photo: #5907

Cameron Dougal, L Corp, Conon

Lance Corporal Dougal Cameron

Date of Paper: 19.07.1918
Surname: Cameron
First Name(s): Dougal
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: Canadians
Home Address: Findon Mains, Conon Bridge

CANADIAN SEAFORTH'S DEATH

The obituary notices and photograph of L/Cpl Dougal Cameron, 78th Canadian (Seaforth) Highlanders, appears in today’s paper. L./Cpl. Cameron, who was the second son of Mrs Cameron, Findon Mains, Conon-Bridge, Ross-shire, died of wounds in No. 4 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station, on 1st June, 1918. Deceased emigrated to Manitoba about five years ago. In 1915 he joined up, and in the following year come over with his battalion, and after training at Salisbury went to France, where he saw much active action in the two following years. In December, 1917, he was wounded. In January last he was home on leave, and, returning to France, was wounded on 1st June, passing away on the same day as stated. L./Cpl. Dougal Cameron had two brothers serving: Donald, with the Seaforths in France, and Alexander with the Camerons in Macedonia. His father died in February last, a circumstance which adds to the tragedy of the loss which has fallen upon the home. Dougal was a fine type of Highlander, and a splendid soldier, as various letters received by the widowed mother testify. Lt. Compton after stating that L./Cpl. Cameron was killed by shell fire says: “Your boy had everybody in the Battalion with him; he certainly was well liked. He was honest and steadfast. His disposition won him hundreds of friends. He was the most reliable machine gunner in the battalion.” Rev R. A. Scarlett, C.F., Winnipeg, says: “It was my privilege to bury your dear boy; his ashes rest in a cemetery beside those of many brave comrades awaiting the Voice of the Resurrection trump. Four representatives of the battalion were sent to the funeral. The glowing tributes they paid to the life of your dear son are enough to make a broken-hearted mother proud that she had given such a noble legacy to the cause of our British Empire in this great world war of ‘Freedom against cruel slavery’. Two officers and two n.c.o’s told me that the influence of your son’s life and conduct would remain with them and help them live better Christian lives. I thought it only right I should send you this loving tribute paid to your sainted, heroic boy, by those whose who soldiered with him. Such a testimony is better and greater to a loving sorrowing mother’s heart than all material riches that could be bestowed.”

Photo: #5909

Fraser Alexander, Pte, Conon

Private Alexander Fraser

Date of Paper: 18.01.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Alexander
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Quarryfield, Conon Bridge

Above is reproduced a photograph of the late Pte. Alex. Fraser, Seaforths, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Duncan Fraser, Quarryfield, Conon Bridge, who was mortally wounded in action, and died at No. 8 General Hospital, France, on the 29th December 1917. Joining up in August 1916, he proceeded to France in December, and served continually, being home on leave only three weeks before he fell. Previous to enlisting, Pte. Fraser was a gardener with Sir Kenneth Mackenzie of Gairloch, Bart., Conon. Deep sympathy is expressed with the bereaved parents and other members of the family.

Photo: #5910

Fraser Donald, Pte, Conon

Private Donald Fraser

Date of Paper: Sept. 1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Donald
Rank: Private
Regiment: 1/4th Seaforths
Home Address: Knocknafanaig, Conon Bridge.

Official information has been received by Mr and Mrs Hugh Fraser, Knocknafanaig, Conon Bridge, that their eldest son, Private Donald Fraser, 1/4th Seaforths, was killed on August 18th.

Fraser, who was killed instantaneously by a shell, joined the battalion at the end of last year, and proceeded to France with the second draft in March. He had taken part in the trench warfare since then. Private Fraser had just been appointed to the transport of the battalion. The testimony of the officer commanding and of the chaplain (Rev John Macleod) shows him to have been a good soldier.

A younger brother, Lance Corporal Hugh Fraser, who was wounded in July, is also with the 1/4th Seaforths; and another brother, Trooper William Fraser, is with the Lovat Scouts.

[See also entry for Lance Corporal Hugh Fraser, MM, Conon ]

Photo: #5896

Fraser Hugh J, Corp, Conon

Corporal Hugh John Fraser

Date of Paper: 27.9.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): Hugh John
Rank: Corporal (later Sergeant)
Regiment: No. 200219, 1st/4th Bn. Seaforths
Home Address: Knocknafanaig, Easter Kinkell, Conon

Corpl. Hugh Fraser, Seaforths, son of Mr Hugh Fraser, Knocknafanaig, Conon Bridge, who was gassed during recent operations, treated in an American hospital in France, and returned to the line recorded, received the gratifying intelligence on coming out of hospital that he had been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field. Cpl. Fraser, although still a young fellow, is one of the tried veterans of the famous 51st Division, who has been with his proud battalion since the early days of the war. He is well known in the district, a fine soldierly fellow, and the best of comrades in fair or foul weather. Before mobilisation he was in the employment of Messrs Young & Chapman, drapers, Dingwall.

Photo: #5895

Fraser Hugh J, Corp, Conon

[15.11.1918]
The death of Corporal Hugh Fraser, M.M., Seaforths, on 15th October, 1918, was recently announced. The son of Mr Fraser, Knocknafanaig, Easter Kinkell, Conon Bridge, his photograph appears today. Writing to the father Lieutenant Pat W. Mackenzie, commanding No. 1 Company, says: “On behalf of the officers. NCO’s and men of the battalion, I wish to convey to you all our heartfelt sympathy in your grievous loss. Your son Hugh was a great favourite; always cheery and ready to help his comrades. As a soldier none could excel him for bravery and devotion to duty, and I looked upon him as one of the great mainstays of the company. Although we heard that he had been dangerously wounded we all hoped he would recover. The news of his death came as a great shock to us all. Hugh died the death of a brave soldier, doing his duty for King and country. I pray that God will sustain you all in your sad bereavement.”

Corporal Hugh Fraser was a remarkably fine specimen of the best type of the great civilian soldier which the great war has produced. He was one of the original BEF 1/4th Seaforths, having mobilised at Dingwall in August 1914, and crossed to France on November 4 in the same year. He endured the hardships of trench life wonderfully well for one who was more used to the shop than the field, but after three months was sent down the line with frost-bite, and returned home. Back again to France soon after Neuve Chapelle in March 1915, he was slightly wounded in the ankle by shrapnel in July of the same year, returning to the battalion after three weeks’ treatment. Throughout the heavy fighting of the two following years, and the glorious 51st Division were ever in the heart of it, Hugh shared the fortunes of his famous battalion. He passed through the spring offensive unscathed, and, as his offer has recorded, made a great reputation for himself as a cool, brave, determined soldier. He was, as recently announced, awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Gassed in August, he was treated in an American hospital, receiving his decoration on his return to his unit about six weeks ago. He died, as stated, on 15th October in the 1/2 Highland Field Ambulance. His photo, which appears today, will recall him to many people in Dingwall district and to old comrades of the regiment. He was in the employment of Messrs Young & Chapman, drapers, Dingwall, when he mobilised. One of three sons serving, he is the second to make the supreme sacrifice. His brother, Private Donald Fraser, A Company, Seaforths, fell in action on 18th August 1915, and was buried at Vielle Chapelle. Another brother, Trooper William Fraser, Lovat Scouts, who saw service in the East, is at present demobilised for agricultural work in the district.

Deep sympathy is felt with the Knocknafannig family in their sorrow, which, in these days with Peace achieved, is perhaps harder to bear than in the full tide of undetermined battle.

[September 1918]
1672 Lance Corporal Hugh Fraser before the outbreak of war was in the employment of Messrs Young and Chapman, drapers, Dingwall. He went out to France with the battalion last year and three months later he was invalided home suffering from frostbite.
[Handwritten note: “Hugh killed 15.10.18”]

[See also entry for Private Donald Fraser, Conon above.]

Photo: #5922

Fraser William, Sgt, Conon

Sergeant William Fraser

Date of Paper: 24.05.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): William
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Hotel Buildings, Conon Bridge

The photos of two Seaforths from Brahan, the ancestral home of the Seaforth regiments, appear today. They are the sons of Mrs Fraser, formerly of Brahan and now residing in the Hotel Buildings, Conon Bridge, Ross-shire. As recently reported, Sergt. Wm. Fraser, M.M., Seaforths, was wounded in the head in the recent offensive and treated in the 1st Scottish General Hospital, Oldmill, Aberdeen.

Sergt. Fraser is still feeling his injuries, but is now home on leave.

The steel helmet afforded him great protection. A piece of shrapnel crashed through the helmet. The shell fragment was stopped, and Sgt. Fraser himself managed to pull it away, but a piece of the helmet was removed only after an operation. His escape was a very narrow one. He wrote home in great spirit, speaking warmly of his treatment at Oldmill and asking anxiously after the 4th Seaforths. Sergt. Fraser joined up at mobilisation and went out in November 1914. He has been with the battalion throughout, and won the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry in action.
His brother, Pte. John Fraser, 2nd Seaforths, has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the battle of Mons.

He was a reservist when war broke out, and was employed at Tay Bridge Station, Dundee, when the call came.

See below for details of his brother John Fraser

Photo: #5916

Fraser John, Pte, Conon

Private John Fraser

Date of Paper: 24.05.1918
Surname: Fraser
First Name(s): John
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforths
Home Address: Hotel Buildings, Conon Bridge

The photos of two Seaforths from Brahan, the ancestral home of the Seaforth regiments, appear today. They are the sons of Mrs Fraser, formerly of Brahan and now residing in the Hotel Buildings, Conon Bridge, Ross-shire. As recently reported, Sergt. Wm. Fraser, M.M., Seaforths, was wounded in the head in the recent offensive and treated in the 1st Scottish General Hospital, Oldmill, Aberdeen.

Sergt. Fraser is still feeling his injuries, but is now home on leave.

The steel helmet afforded him great protection. A piece of shrapnel crashed through the helmet. The shell fragment was stopped, and Sgt. Fraser himself managed to pull it away, but a piece of the helmet was removed only after an operation. His escape was a very narrow one. He wrote home in great spirit, speaking warmly of his treatment at Oldmill and asking anxiously after the 4th Seaforths. Sergt. Fraser joined up at mobilisation and went out in November 1914. He has been with the battalion throughout, and won the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry in action.

His brother, Pte. John Fraser, 2nd Seaforths, has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the battle of Mons.

He was a reservist when war broke out, and was employed at Tay Bridge Station, Dundee, when the call came.

See above for details of his brother William Fraser

Photo: #5905

Gollan George R, Gunner, Conon

Gunner George R. Gollan

Date of Paper: 02.06.1916
Surname: Gollan
First Name(s): George R.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Ross Mountain Battery
Home Address: Bridge Street, Conon Bridge

Mrs Gollan, Bridge Street, Conon Bridge, Ross-shire, gave three sons to the Army; one has been killed, another is a prisoner of war, the third is serving with Ross Mountain Battery. Mrs Gollan has been a widow for fourteen years; her husband was a carpenter in the employment of Mr W. Macdonald, Dingwall.

The eldest son, Gunner George R. Gollan (41), joined the Ross Mountain Battery just a year ago. He returned from Canada, where he was in British Columbia for a period of three years engaged in survey work for the Dominion Government. He at once attached himself to the 2/4th Highland Mountain Brigade.

The second son, Lance-Corporal Robert M. Gollan (31), 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was killed on 1st October, 1914. A reservist with 11 years’ service, who had been through the South African War, he rejoined on mobilisation.

See records below for his two brothers Robert and W. Gollan

Photo: #5908

Gollan Robert M, L Corp, Conon

Lance Corporal Robert M. Gollan

Date of Paper: 02.06.1916
Surname: Gollan
First Name(s): Robert. M.
Rank: Lance Corporal
Regiment: 2nd Cameron Highlanders
Home Address: Bridge Street, Conon Bridge

Mrs Gollan, Bridge Street, Conon Bridge, Ross-shire, gave three sons to the Army; one has been killed, another is a prisoner of war, the third is serving with Ross Mountain Battery. Mrs Gollan has been a widow for fourteen years; her husband was a carpenter in the employment of Mr W. Macdonald, Dingwall.

The eldest son, Gunner George R. Gollan (41), joined the Ross Mountain Battery just a year ago. He returned from Canada, where he was in British Columbia for a period of three years engaged in survey work for the Dominion Government. He at once attached himself to the 2/4th Highland Mountain Brigade.

The second son, Lance-Corporal Robert M. Gollan (31), 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was killed on 1st October, 1914. A reservist with 11 years’ service, who had been through the South African War, he rejoined on mobilisation.

See entry above for George R. Gollan and entry below for W. Gollan

Photo: #5920

Gollan W, Pte, Conon

Private W. Gollan

Date of Paper: 02.06.1916
Surname: Gollan
First Name(s): W.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Not known
Home Address: Bridge Street, Conon Bridge

Mrs Gollan, Bridge Street, Conon Bridge, Ross-shire, gave three sons to the Army; one has been killed, another is a prisoner of war, the third is serving with Ross Mountain Battery. Mrs Gollan has been a widow for fourteen years; her husband was a carpenter in the employment of Mr W. Macdonald, Dingwall.

The eldest son, Gunner George R. Gollan (41), joined the Ross Mountain Battery just a year ago. He returned from Canada, where he was in British Columbia for a period of three years engaged in survey work for the Dominion Government. He at once attached himself to the 2/4th Highland Mountain Brigade.

The second son, Lance-Corporal Robert M. Gollan (31), 2nd Cameron Highlanders, was killed on 1st October, 1914. A reservist with 11 years’ service, who had been through the South African War, he rejoined on mobilisation.

See above entries for his two brothers, George and Robert