World War 1

War Records 1914-18



Sergeant A Macdonald, DCM (Tain)


Bombardier Alexander Macdonald (Conon)


Private Alexander Macdonald (Evanton)


Private Alexander Macdonald (Novar, Evanton)


Lieutenant Alexander Macdonald (Mulbuie)


Sergeant Alick Macdonald (Alness)


Trooper Alick D Macdonald (Muir of Ord)


Private Angus Macdonald (Alness)


Gunner Angus Macdonald (Dingwall)


Captain Angus Macdonald, MC (Dingwall)


Private Charles Macdonald


Private D Macdonald (Contin)


Sergeant Donald Macdonald (Alness)


Private Donald Macdonald (Dingwall)


L/Corporal Donald Macdonald (Lentran)


Trooper Donald J Macdonald (Alness)


Corporal Duncan Macdonald (Muir of Ord)

Corporal Duncan Macdonald (Strathconon)


Private Duncan Macdonald (Torridon)


L/Corporal Ewan N Macdonald


L/Corporal Finlay Macdonald


Captain George Macdonald


Sergeant Hector Macdonald (Muir of Ord) later to become ........


......... Lieutenant Hector Macdonald (Muir of Ord)


Sergeant Hugh Macdonald (Alness)


L/Corporal Hugh Macdonald (Strathconon)


Private Hugh F Macdonald (Muir of Ord)

Surname Macdonald

Surname Forename(s) Rank Home Relationship
Macdonald A Sergeant ex-Tain  
Macdonald A D Trooper Evanton Brothers 1
Macdonald Alexander Bombardier Conon  
Macdonald Alexander Private Evanton  
Macdonald Alexander Private Evanton Brothers 2
Macdonald Alexander S Lieutenant Mulbuie  
Macdonald Alick Sergeant Alness  
Macdonald Alick Not stated Strathcarron Brothers 3
Macdonald Alick D Trooper Muir of Ord Brothers 4
Macdonald Angus Private Alness Brothers 5
Macdonald Angus Gunner Dingwall  
Macdonald Angus Captain Dingwall  
Macdonald Charles Private Strathconon Brothers 6
Macdonald D Private Contin  
Macdonald Donald Sergeant Alness  5
Macdonald Donald Private Dingwall Brothers 7
Macdonald Donald L/Corporal Lentran  
Macdonald Donald J Trooper NZ ex-Alness Brothers 8
Macdonald Duncan Corporal Muir of Ord  
Macdonald Duncan Corporal Strathconon  6
Macdonald Duncan Private Torridon Brothers 9
Macdonald Ewan N L/Corporal Ullapool  
Macdonald Finlay L/Corporal Torridon  9
Macdonald George Captain London  8
Macdonald Hector Sergt./Lieut. Muir of Ord  4
Macdonald Hugh Sergeant Alness  5
Macdonald Hugh L/Corporal Strathconon  6
Macdonald Hugh F Private Muir of Ord  
Page 02        
Macdonald James Corporal Alness  5
Macdonald James L/Corporal Evanton  1
Macdonald James L/Corporal Muir of Ord  4
Macdonald James Sergeant Strathconon  
Macdonald James Sergeant Strathpeffer Brothers 10
Macdonald James L/Corporal Strathpeffer Brothers 11
Macdonald John Private Dingwall Brothers 12
Macdonald John Private Killearnan  
Macdonald John Private Strathpeffer  10
Macdonald John Private Torridon  
Macdonald John F Piper Fortrose Brothers 13
Macdonald Joseph Doctor Invergordon  
Macdonald Kenneth N Seaman Plockton  
Macdonald Murdo Private Torridon  9
Macdonald Murdo M Corporal Conon  
Macdonald Peter Gunner Dingwall  12
Macdonald Peter Private Dingwall  7
Macdonald R Private Canada ex-
Dingwall
 
Macdonald R L/Corporal Muir of Ord  
Macdonald Richard Not stated Alness  5
Macdonald Roderick 2/Lieutenant Dingwall  
Macdonald Roderick Private Evanton  2
Macdonald Roderick Private Munlochy  
Macdonald Thomas G Corporal Fortrose  13
Macdonald William Gunner Alness  5
Macdonald William L/Corporal Dingwall  
Macdonald William Piper Strathpeffer  11
Macdonald William Private Strathcarron  3

Date of Paper:  08.11.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  A.
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Australians
Home Address:  Australia, ex Easter Ross

A photo appears today of Sergeant A. Macdonald, D.C.M., Australians, who according to Australian papers to hand has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Sergeant Macdonald belongs to Easter Ross, which he left seven years ago for Australia. From boyhood until he emigrated he had been employed by Mr J. D. Laidlaw, Tain. "As a lad, "Mr Laidlaw says, "he was the gamest of the game, and could with ease do the work of three ordinary men." He was well known in Easter Ross, and the many friends of his boyhood will rejoice in the distinction which he has attained. An Australian newspaper says: "Sergeant Macdonald is a native of Scotland, and at the time of his enlistment was an employee of Tooth & Co Limited, Sydney. He joined the Army Service Corps as a driver, and left with the First Division for Egypt. During the voyage he succeeded in winning in one day the welter- and middle-weight boxing championships of his troopship . Whilst in camp in the Egypt he defeated the champion boxer of the Egyptian forces and won the welter-weight championship of the camp.
Driver Macdonald participated in the the landing at Gallipoli, and went right through the campaign there. Subsequently he was transferred to France, and was mentioned on several occasions for conspicuous gallantry, in the meantime being promoted to sergeant. He is now one of the veterans of the A.I.F., being still at the front.

Date of Paper:  12.07.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  A. D.
Rank:  Trooper
Regiment:  Australian Light Horse
Home Address:  Hill Terrace, Evanton

No photograph avaliable

EVANTON SCOUT WOUNDED
L./Cpl. James Macdonald, Lovat Scouts, Evanton, is at present lying in the Military Hospital Hamilton, suffering from Malaria, from which he was invalided home from Salonica in March last. Lance Corporal Macdonald was called to the colours on 5th August, 1914. He served in the Dardanellas campaign till the evacuation, then in Egypt, and later in Salonica. His only brother, Trooper A D Macdonald, is serving with the Australian Light Horse. He was in the service of the Governor General of Australia before joining up. Both are sons of Mrs Macdonald, Hill Terrace, Evanton, Ross shire. A photograph of Lance Corporal James Macdonald appears to day.

Date of Paper:  12.07.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  James
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Lovat Scouts
Home Address:  Hill Terrace, Evanton

Date of Paper:  17.08.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Bombardier
Regiment:  R.G.A.
Home Address:  Mulchaich, Alcaig, Conon Bridge

Bombardier Alexander Macdonald, R.G.A., who has been severely wounded while serving on the Western front, and is now in an English hospital, is a son-in-law of Mr Donald Maclean, manager, Mulchaich, Alcaig, Conon Bridge. Br. Macdonald is himself a native of Bridgend, Invermoriston. Mr Maclean has a son serving with the London Regiment, and a daughter engaged in military nursing.
A photograph of Bom. Macdonald appears today.

Date of Paper:  17.11.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Evanton

Information has been received by his friends that 5030 Private Alex. Macdonald, Seaforths, who went out to France some time ago, and who has been with the regiment through the recent fighting, has been admitted to Bellahouston Hospital, Glasgow, suffering from shell shock and shrapnel wound in the ankle. He is progressing favourably.
Private A. Macdonald is the youngest son of Mr Alex Macdonald, dealer, Evanton, who is also serving his King and Country, being in the National Reserve.

Date of Paper:  16.11.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  King's Royal Rifles
Home Address:  Novar, Evanton

There is reproduced today photographs of two soldiers sons of Mr Roderick Macdonald, plasterer, Novar, Evanton.
Private Roderick Macdonald, Australians, is Mr Macdonald's second son. He came over with the second contingent, and, after some time in Egypt, proceeded to France. Unfortunately, he contracted heart trouble on active service, and is now under treatment in a hospital in Hampstead, where he is progressing satisfactorily, and has the benefit of an occasional visit from his brother and sisters.
Private Alexander Macdonald, the youngest son of Mr Macdonald, is training with the King's Royal Rifles near London. Before joining up he was employed in Evanton Post Office, and was widely known and much esteemed.

Date of Paper:  16.11.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Roderick
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Australians
Home Address:  Australia, ex Novar, Evanton

Date of Paper:  19.11.1915 and 01.09.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alexander S.
Rank:  Lieutenant
Regiment:  Australian Artillery
Home Address:  Rootfield, Muir of Ord

The above is a photograph of Mr Alex. S. Macdonald, son of Mr Wm. Macdonald, Rootfield, Dingwall, and nephew of the late General Sir Hector Macdonald, D.S.O., who gave up a splendid Government position in Sydney, Australia, to do his duty by his home country.
Mr A. S. Macdonald is attached to the Artillery Section as Battery Director, in which connection there is a large amount of theoretical calculations and considerable risk observing the enemy.
Mr Macdonald was a distinguished student of the Glasgow Technical College in Civil Engineering, and previous to his Sydney appointment held an important position as engineer in the extensive harbour works erected at Para, Brazil.

[01.09.1916]
Above is reproduced a portrait of Lieutenant Alexander S. Macdonald, Australian Artillery, and a nephew of the late General Sir Hector Macdonald. As reported last week, Mr William Macdonald, Rootfield, Muir of Ord, has been informed that his son is lying in No. 3 Hospital, Wandsworth, London, suffering from wounds recently received in action, and, although without definitive information as to the nature and extent of the wounds, Mr Macdonald has been reassured by his brother, resident in London, that the young lieutenant will by and by be able to come North.
As already reported, Lieutenant Macdonald before the war was a civil engineer. Educated at Mulbuie School and Dingwall Academy, he entered the office of Mr Reid, C.E., Inverness, and qualified after a four years' apprenticeship. This completed he entered the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College, and took his degree with distinction, gaining the Hart Scholarship for two years and the prize awarded to the most successful student of the diploma course in civil engineering. Subsequently he took the A.M.I.C.E. and the M.R.S.I. degrees. His class records are distinguished.
On qualifying, Lieutenant Macdonald obtained a remarkably good appointment in Brazil, and from thence proceeded to British Columbia. As already recorded, the war found him prompt to respond to the martial record of his family. Disappointed at not being able to join the first Canadian Contingent, he crossed to Australia on a Government appointment, which, soon after his arrival, he resigned to come to Europe as a private in the Australian Expeditionary Force. On reaching the home country his qualifications pointed him out for promotion; and he received a commission in the Australian Artillery, for which his training pre-eminently equipped him in many essential ways.
Lieutenant Macdonald is 27 years of age. His many friends will wish him a complete and speedy recovery.

Date of Paper:  18.01.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alick
Rank:  Sergeant Major
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Easter Ardross, Alness

No. 200018 Sergeant-Major Alick Macdonald, son of Widow A. Macdonald, Easter Ardross, Alness, who was posted as missing since 20-23 November, 1917, is now reported prisoner of war in Germany. A post card from Sergeant Major Macdonald was received last week. This is one of the earliest reports received of Seaforths missing since November 20-23 being prisoners of war.
A member of the Seaforth Territorials, Sgt.-Major Macdonald mobilised with the battalion in August, 1914, and went to France with them the following November. Time-expired in 1916, he re-engaged for the duration of the war. For four years he was an enthusiastic member of the old Volunteers and a Territorial since the Force was inaugurated. All who knew him speak in highest terms of his high qualities and cameraderie both in civilian and army life.
His brother, Donald, married with a young family in England, joined up in 1915, and has been with a service battalion of Seaforths on active service for about two years. A photograph appears today.

Date of Paper:  26.05.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alick
Rank:  Not stated
Regiment:  1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address:  Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron

No photograph available

THE LATE PTE. WM. MACDONALD, STRATHCARRON
News was received on 4th May, 1916, by his mother that her son, Pte. Wm. M. Macdonald, No. 47028, 1st Canadian Contingent, died of severe wounds in a clearing station in France on 29th April. Deceased was the youngest son of the late Wm. Macdonald, road surveyor, and Mrs Macdonald, Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron, Ross-shire. Deceased served his time in the old Caledonian Bank at Lochcarron, after which he was transferred to the head office at Inverness. He left there to take up an appointment in the branch of the Argentine Bank in London and River Plate Bank at Buenos Aires. He then emigrated to Canada, and on the outbreak of war enlisted in the 48th Highlanders of Canada. By a strange coincidence his brother, Alick, joined the same regiment, but neither was aware of the fact until they accidentally met in the trenches. His regiment went to France about eighteen months ago, and has been through some severe fighting, but up to the time he was fatally wounded he came through without a scratch, although by his letters he had many narrow escapes. He was the youngest of eleven of a family, was over 6 ft. in height, and his death is the first break in the family. Much sympathy is felt for his mother, sisters and brothers.

Date of Paper:  26.05.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  William M.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  1st Canadian Contingent
Home Address:  Redbank Cottage, Strathcarron

Date of Paper:  31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Alick D.
Rank:  Trooper
Regiment:  3/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address:  Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

TWO LOVAT SCOUTS AND A 4th SEAFORTH
Mr D Macdonald, Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord, is proud of his three sons, who are serving with the colours; and he deserves the congratulations of everyone. Two of them are in the Lovat Scouts and one in the 1/4th Seaforths. The second son, James, was wounded at the end of last year, but is now doing well.
The eldest son is Alick D. Macdonald, who joined the 3/2nd Lovat Scouts in September last, and after four months' training is on the eve of leaving for the front. Alick Macdonald occupied a lucrative position in the London and Brazilian Bank at Sao Paulo, which, after serving for the past five years, he gave up to come home and fight for his country. He served his apprenticeship as a banker with Mr Simon Macdonald, late agent of the Commercial Bank Beauly, and now of the Inverness branch. The best wishes go out to this young soldier in his self-imposed task.
Lance Corporal James Macdonald is also a Lovat Scout, being attached to the 1/2nd regiment. A farmer by occupation he went to his regiment on mobilisation, and after a prolonged sojourn in England proceeded to the Dardanelles, where his regiment did such good work He was wounded on 12th December last, and for some time was in hospital at Malta. He has made a good recovery, and on 2nd February he was removed to the Mellieha Camp, Malta. His wound was in the left shoulder. By this time he may have rejoined his regiment.
The third son, 1495 Sergeant Hector Macdonald, was with the 1/4th Seaforths, but was invalided home last November with enteric fever. He has now completely recovered, and has rejoined with the 3/4th Seaforths. Sergeant Macdonald served his apprenticeship in the Commercial Bank, Muir of Ord, and subsequently was in the Dingwall branch. He joined the county territorial regiment on mobilisation, and after training at Bedford went to France in November 1914. For fully a year he was with the battalion, and although he was through all the principal engagements he never received a scratch, and it was not till the terrible scourge, enteric, got him that he was compelled to leave his battalion.
Above we reproduce the photographs of the three Macdonalds.

Date of Paper:  31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Hector
Rank:  Sergeant (Lieut. 23.8.18)
Regiment:  1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

Date of Paper:  31.03.1916 and 23.08.1918 (photograph only)
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  James
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  1/2nd Lovat Scouts
Home Address:  Wester Urray Farm, Muir of Ord

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Angus
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Albert Cottage, Alness

There is reproduced to day photographs of five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Albert Cottage, Alness, and formerly of Tain, who have given in all six sons to the Army, one of whom, as recently reported, was killed in action in November, 1917. In addition, Mr and Mrs Macdonald have a son-in-law on active service. It is an inspiring record of patriotic fervour and devoted service to King and Country.
Corporal James Macdonald (23), Duke of Cornwall's Infantry, was killed in action on November 21, 1917. Deceased mobilised with the County Seaforth Battalion at the outbreak of war, and went overseas with it in November, 1914, to reinforce the First Seven Divisions. Time expired in March, 1916, he came home, and was employed at the Gas Works, Invergordon. The call of duty remained strong with him, however, and he voluntarily joined the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry in June, 1917. Within four weeks he was back in the line on the Western Front. A fine, manly, type of soldier, hardy, enduring, and uncomplaining, his death will be regretted by Seaforths with whom he served.
Writing to the bereaved parents, the Chaplain of his battalion (Rev. J. H. McKew), says: "I write to tell you how sorry I feel for you in the loss of your brave son, Corporal Macdonald, of this battalion. It will be a comfort to you to know he did not suffer. He was hit as the company was smashing through the Hindenburg Line. He was a splendid soldier, and was loved and respected by all who knew him." Captain J. W. Rawle, D.C.L.I., in a letter, says: "It is with much regret I write to inform you of your son's death. I am very sorry indeed to lose him. He was a really good boy and a fine soldier, and he died a soldier's death. He will be sadly missed by all officers and men of this company. Please accept my deepest sympathy in which my brother officers and men wish to join." Before the war Corporal Macdonald was an apprentice plasterer with Mr Reid, Alness
Private Angus Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the County Battalion in November 1914, has seen much service on the Western Front. Gassed at Loos in September, 1914, he has been wounded four times, and for four months has been in Glasgow Royal Infirmary recovering from wounds and trench fever. Previous to the war he was an employee of the Glasgow Tramway Corporation.
Sergeant Hugh Macdonald, Guards Division, R.A.M.C., has been in France since the outbreak of war. Forming part of the original B.E.F. he is a twice seasoned veteran. A splendid type, well upholding the high traditions of the Guards, he has just been awarded the Military Medal for having removed a number of wounded under heavy shell fire. He was home on leave a month ago. Before the war, like his brother, Angus, he was employed on the Glasgow Tramways.
Gunner William Macdonald, Royal Engineers, attached Tanks Corps, joined up in 1915, but was not called for service till April, 1917. He is a machine gunner with the Tanks, and is at present in this country. An electrical engineer he worked in Glasgow for a number of years.
Sergeant Donald Macdonald is serving with the 3rd American Infantry and is acting as an instructor in Iowa U.S.A.
The youngest son of the family, Richard Macdonald, mobilised with the 4th Seaforths at the outbreak of war. Under age, he was sent to a Provisional Battalion, and in March 1916, was released for Government work, upon which he is still employed.
Driver C.G. Anderson, son-in-law joined up early in 1915, was in France till July, 1916, and has been serving in Salonica since October, 1916.

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  3rd American Infantry
Home Address:  Iowa, USA, ex Albert Cottage, Alness

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Hugh
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Guards Division, Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address:  Albert Cottage, Alness

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  James
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths / Duke of Cornwall's Infantry
Home Address:  Albert Cottage, Alness

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s)  Richard
Rank:  Not stated
Regiment:  4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Albert Cottage Alness

No photograph available

Date of Paper:  01.02.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s);  William
Rank:  Gunner
Regiment:  Royal Engineers / Tank Corps
Home Address:  Albert Cottage, Alness

Date of Paper:  23.04.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Angus
Rank:  Gunner
Regiment:  R.G.A
Home Address:  2, Coronation Cottage, Warden Street, Dingwall

We reproduce above a photograph of Gunner Angus Macdonald, R.G.A., who met his death on 23rd March, 1916, in an accident which occurred in the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich. Deceased, who was 54 years of age, served over 14 years in the Artillery, and retired some years ago. At the outbreak of war, with true patriotic Highland fervour, he rejoined his old battery. A tall, handsome type of man, he will be well remembered in Dingwall, where he resided for a considerable period some four or five years ago. He was a native of Sutherlandshire, having been born at Assynt, to which place his father, the late Sergeant Kenneth Macdonald, of the 78th, also belonged.
He is survived by a widow and a brother, who is Mr D Macdonald, 2, Coronation Cottage, Warden Street, Dingwall.

Date of Paper:  14.12.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Angus (Ray)
Rank:  Captain
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Craig Road, Dingwall

A photograph appears today of Captain Angus Macgillivray (Ray) Macdonald, M.C., Seaforths, son of Mr Macdonald, late rector, Dingwall Academy, and Mrs Macdonald, Craig Road, Dingwall, As recorded last week, Captain Ray Macdonald fell on the 21st November at the head of his company in the recent advance, dying before he reached the Field Post. He was 24 years of age. A non-commissioned officer of the Seaforths writes:
Almost every week the loss of some dear comrade is reported, bringing home to us with terrible earnestness the awfulness of the present struggle. Today we mourn the loss of one who was bringing honour to his native town and adding laurels to the Seaforth name. And how much he loved the dear old town, and how near to his heart were its old ties only those in constant touch with him can understand. I write of him as a school chum; I knew him better as such than as a soldier, although it was my good fortune to have been long associated with him in both directions. Dear old Ray! The very name brings freshness to the sweetest memories, and his bright smile, his winning ways, and all-round attractiveness appear clearly portrayed at the very mention of it. He was loved in those school days by everyone who came in contact with him, his comradeship was sought by all, for to know him was to love him.   Many pages could be filled in chronicling the doings of these bygone days, but to those whose privilege it was to take part in them it is unnecessary to refresh their memories. The knowledge of the passing of the chief actor in most of these scenes is sufficient reminder for all. To his school fellows, who still have the privilege of life, his passing comes as a personal loss, but so long as that life lasts so shall the memory of the boy we all loved so well. As he was in school so also was he in the great Army of today. Just as popular and as brave as he was bright. He took kindly to his life in the Army, and nothing was nearer to his heart than the comfort and care of the men under his command. This was his whole absorbing thought, and how well he gave effect to the thought can best be testified to by the men themselves.   Now he has passed into the Great Unknown, where many of his fellows shall greet his arrival, while those who mourn his loss shall face 'the breaking of the day' with the expectancy of meeting him over there. Until then, good-bye, dear boy. The sands of time are clearly marked with your footprints, and the pals you have left behind are still endeavouring to emulate and follow your magnificent example. And, if in following they must needs pay the same sacrifice as you have done, they are strengthened in doing so knowing that your bright smile and welcome greeting awaits their passing.

Date of Paper:  03.03.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Charles
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Scots Guards
Home Address:  Strathconon

We reproduce on this page the photographs of three soldier sons of the late Mr Charles Macdonald and Mrs Macdonald, Strathconon. Corporal Duncan Macdonald and Lance Corporal Hugh Macdonald are both members of the 4th Seaforths, of which regiment they have been units for eight years, Duncan joining when he was 17, and Hugh when he was 15 years of age. They were both with the regiment at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, following which they were home for a short period of sick leave. They returned to France, but Duncan was again unfortunate, and had to return to England suffering from appendicitis. Hugh was present at the battle of Loos where he was wounded. He has made a good recovery, and is now with his brother at Ripon. Both are excellent shots. Big strapping fellows, they are well known athletes, and were good shinty players. In civil life they are gardeners, following the footsteps of their grandfather, the late Mr Duncan Maciver, for so many years gardener to Lady Jane Combe of Strathconon, and to Mr A. J. Balfour, the former proprieter of Strathconon.
Private Charles Macdonald is in the Scots Guards. He was employed in Demerara at the outbreak of war. He came home to enlist. He has been at the front for over a year, and although he was wounded at Ypres, he was not sent home, recovering from his injuries in France. He is a fine specimen of the Highlander, standing 6 ft 6 inches in his stocking soles.   Another son has just joined the colours, and a fifth, a twin, is only waiting till he is of age. Mrs Macdonald is proud of her soldier sons, and she has many sympathisers in her anxiety as to their welfare.

Date of Paper:  03.03.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Duncan
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Strathconon

Date of Paper:  03.03.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Hugh
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Strathconon

Date of Paper:  08.06.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  D.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Canadians
Home Address:  East Cottages, Kinnahaird, Contin

Private D Macdonald, Canadians, wounded, whose photograph appears today, is the youngest son of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, East Cottages, Kinnahaird, Contin. He emigrated to Canada nine years ago, and was engaged on the land when he heard his country's call, and promptly responded like many of his brave comrades who fell on the Vimy Ridge, where Macdonald was wounded. Private Macdonald has made a complete recovery.

Date of Paper:  20.10.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address:  Mountrich, Dingwall

The above are portraits of the two sons of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Mountrich, Dingwall, Private Donald Macdonald (20), and Private Peter Macdonald (18), both of the Seaforth Highlanders. The elder son went to the front in November, 1914, and has been in France ever since, with the exception of a few weeks when he was invalided home on sick leave. Previous to the war he was a ploughman at Mountrich. The younger son went to France in March this year, and previous to joining the army he was employed by Messrs Low and Coy., Dingwall.   He was wounded on 26th July last by shrapnel, but not seriously enough to warrant his being sent home. Both boys are good shots, and are recognised snipers in the battalion.

Date of Paper:  20.10.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Peter
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address:  Mountrich, Dingwall

Date of Paper:  12.07.1918 and 09.08.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Lentran

Mrs Macdonald, Lentran, widow of the late Mr Simon Macdonald, banker, Dingwall and Inverness, received unofficially last week intimation that her only son, Lance Corporal Donald Macdonald, Seaforths, was killed in action on the Western Front on Friday, June 28, at 7.30 a.m. The information was to the effect that a shell had landed upon the post in which, as signaller, he was engaged on special duty, and that he was killed more by concussion than by direct wounds, of which there was hardly a trace. Donald Macdonald was a splendidly set up, stalwart type of Highlander. Nineteen years of age in February last, his training in the Army had greatly developed his physique as it had broadened his outlook on life. He joined the Service from Oxford University, where he was studying forestry, and at the outset his army training in the graduate stage was directed towards commissioned rank. Under new regulations it was required that he should serve abroad and hold non-commissioned rank, and, these conditions having been fulfilled, his papers for a commission were on the way to him when he fell in action. Trained in the south of Scotland, he was transferred to Cromarty, from whence he proceeded to France soon after the beginning of the German offensive. He shared in the first battles on the Flanders front, reaching the line in time to take part in the great defensive actions which successfully held for a time and place the German attempt to reach the Channel ports. Since then, with brief periods of rest, he had been in the line.   "Donald," wrote a companion, who conveyed the sad news to the mother, "was an exceptionally fine fellow, of outstanding qualities and great capabilities, and a better chum could not be found anywhere." A native of Beauly district, Lance Corporal Macdonald was educated at Beauly, Dingwall Academy, and Inverness College. On completing his education at Inverness, and after being a short time in the Bank there, under his late father, he proceeded to Oxford, where he was making excellent progress with his studies when relieved for military service. Old for his years, he was a fine type of manly boy when a pupil at Dingwall, and among those who will mourn his loss and who feel inexpressible sympathy for the widowed mother, no one will do so more than his former school companions. Mrs Macdonald, whose husband passed away in February, 1917, has two daughters.

[09.08.1918]
There is reproduced today a photograph of the late Lance Corporal Donald Macdonald, Seaforths, son of the late Mr Simon Macdonald, banker, and Mrs Macdonald, Lentran who, as recently reported, was killed in action in France on June 28th last. Deceased was a promising young lad of 19 years of age, who left his College at Cambridge, where he was studying forestry, to join the colours. He had completed the period and attained the rank necessary for admission to a cadet course, the papers for which were on the way to him when he was killed. Donald Macdonald's death is much mourned by many former school associates. He is well remembered as a pupil at Dingwall Academy.

Date of Paper:  04.04.1919
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Donald James
Rank:  Trooper
Regiment:  9th Squadron, Wellington Mounted Rifles
Home Address:  New Zealand, ex Rosskeen, Invergordon

There is reproduced to day two sons of the Manse, Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., and Trooper Donald James Macdonald, sons of the Rev George Macdonald, late of Rosskeen, and Mrs Macdonald, now of 19 Mansionhouse Road, Edinburgh, who have done their bit in the war.
Captain George Macdonald, R.A.M.C., was in Kensington, London, when he enlisted in January 1916. He served for a year in Mesopotamia, and subsequently in France and Flanders, where he is at present. He was attached to different regiments, including a Yorkshire battalion and a battalion of the Black Watch. Captain Macdonald, who is now 33 years of age, is married, and has a young son.
Trooper Donald James Macdonald, 9th Squadron, Wellington Mounted Rifles, New Zealand, who is 30 years of age, joined up in 1916, prior to which he was a farmer in Wairow, New Zealand. He served in Egypt and subsequently in Palestine. He was slightly wounded in the East, but has made a good recovery.

Date of Paper:  04.04.1919
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  George
Rank:  Captain
Regiment:  Royal Army Medical Corps
Home Address:  London, ex Rosskeen, Invergordon

Date of Paper:  04.05.1917
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Duncan
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Gowanfield, Muir of Ord

Corporal Duncan Macdonald, Seaforths, was killed in action on the 9th April. He was the second son of Mr and Mrs Macdonald, Gowanfield, Muir of Ord. In civil life he had served an apprenticeship in the Muir of Ord and Dingwall branch of the Bank of Scotland. Shortly after being put on the permanent staff of the Bank he enlisted in the 2/4th Seaforth highlanders. In camp his aptitude and enthusiasm as a soldier marked him out for quick promotion, and before his training ended he had attained the rank of sergeant.
For service abroad Macdonald was drafted into another Seaforth battalion. In accordance with army regulations, he began in his new company as a private, and on active service also his intelligence and soldierly qualities marked him out for a distinguished career. But after nine months at the front his career has ended in the supreme sacrifice for home and country at the early age of twenty three years.
The esteem in which Corporal Macdonald was held by his Bank managers may be learned from the fact that their agent at Dingwall was instructed to convey to the bereaved friends, "their deep sympathy with them." His officer wrote: "I feel certain that you will be proud of the unflinching manner in which your son met his death. The officers, N.C.O's and men of his company mourn the death of one so obliging and useful."
The sad intelligence cast quite a gloom over the district of Muir of Ord, where the fallen soldier was deservedly popular among all classes. His blameless life, and gentle manners, and gentlemanly bearing, made him the best of sons and the best of friends. He will not be readily forgotten by those who knew him, and the heartfelt sympathy of the community goes to a home that has been darkened by the loss of a son and brother so worthy of [obliterated] and affection.
A portrait of Corporal Macdonald appears today.

Date of Paper:  16.08.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Duncan
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  New Zealanders
Home Address:  The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

THREE INVERALLIGIN SOLDIERS
Photographs of the three soldier sons of Widow A. Macdonald, The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon, are reproduced today. Two of them are prisoners of war in Germany, and the other is serving in France.
Three handsome men, they responded with alacrity to the call of country.
Lance Corporal Finlay Macdonald, Seaforths, joined the county battalion on the outbreak of war, trained at Bedford, and went to France in November, 1914, for which he is entitled to the 1914 Star of the First Seven Divisions. Wounded at Neuve Chapelle in the first battle in which the 1/4th Seaforths took part, and when so many sons of Ross suffered, he was invalided home for a few months. Wounded a second time, after recovering he returned up the line, and serving in many engagements, including the battle of Cambrai where he received his lance corporal's stripe and was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field, he was posted to the stretcher bearer section of his unit. He took part in the fighting on March 21/23, and on the latter date was made prisoner of war, and is now in Germany. Previous to joining up, for a number of years he was proprieter of the Lochailort Hotel.
Private Duncan Macdonald, the second son, is serving in France with the New Zealanders. He went to new Zealand 11 years ago, and when war broke out he was manager of a large sheep ranch in the Wiararapa district of the North Island of New Zealand. He joined the New Zealand Rifle Brigade in the beginning of 1917, and after training in New Zealand and England went to France in May of this year.
Private Murdo Macdonald, H.L.I., as recently reported, was made prisoner of war on 1st April last. Murdo joined up when a boy of 16 years of age. Too young for service he was discharged. On becoming 18 years of age he rejoined, and was posted to the Seaforths. He went to France in March last, and was made prisoner in course of the defensive actions against the German attempt to capture the Channel Ports. Previous to joining up he was a waiter in the Grant Arms Hotel, Grantown.
He is a prisoner of war in Limberg Camp, unwounded, and well.

Date of Paper:  16.08.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Finlay
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

Date of Paper:  16.08.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Murdo
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Highland Light Infantry
Home Address:  The Shore, Inveralligin, Torridon

Date of Paper:  08.09.1916
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Ewan N.
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address:  Inverlael Farm, Ullapool

Mr William Macdonald, late of Loggie and Kildonan, Lochbroom, has received intimation that his son, Mr Ewan N. Macdonald, Inverlael Farm, has been killed in action on the 18th inst in France. When war broke out he was a joint tenant with his brother in the farm of Inverlael. After the battle of Loos, when the outlook did not seem too bright, Ewan could not resist the call of King and country; leaving the farm in charge of his brother, he enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders.
A typical Highlander, physically robust, and of a very cheerful disposition, he was a general favourite; having got through his training quickly, he was attached to a draft sent to fill the gaps in the regiment at the front, where he was continually until the end. His mother, who died some years ago, was the only daughter of the late Mr John Stewart, tacksman of Drumchork and Little Gruinard Farms, and sister of Mr Stewart, Zetville, Aultbea. The sympathy of the community is extended to Mr Macdonald and family in their sudden bereavement.
Captain Gray, the officer commanding, in writing to Mr Macdonald, says "We are all feeling deeply the loss of your son, as he was always cheerful and happy, and a great big favourite with us all, I can only offer you sincere sympathy in your great loss, and I would like to let you know that Ewan's comrades also wish me to inform you how much they feel for you."

Date of Paper:  12.11.1918
Surname:  Macdonald
First Name(s):  Hugh F.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Ord Village, Muir of Ord

Macdonald, Private Hugh F., 19 years of age, was village postman at Muir of Ord, and for three years caretaker at the Drill Hall. Quiet and obliging, he was very popular. His brother Alexander a corporal in the 1st Australian Contingent, was wounded about the same date as Hugh was killed.
Deceased was the son of Mr and Mrs James Macdonald, Ord Village.

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