World War 1

War Records 1914-18


Major (Rev.) Andrew Macfarlane, MA, BD, DSO


CSM Macfarlane (Glasgow)


Private J G Macfarlane


Captain James Macfarlane


(Rank unknown) John Adam Macfarlane


(Rank unknown) Walter Malcolm Macfarlane


Sergeant Alexander Macgillivray


Sergeant Donald Macgillivray (Dingwall)


Private Donald Macgillivray (Evanton)


Lieutenant J S Macgillivray


Sergeant John Macgillivray


Sergeant William T Macgillivray


Lance Corporal McGinn


Lance Corporal Harry D McGlashan


2/Lieutenant Donald Edward Francis Macgregor


Private Duncan Macgregor


Lieutenant John Macgregor


Bombardier Murdo Macgregor


Private Roderick Macgregor


Sergeant Simon Macgregor


Lance Corporal William Macgregor


Surname Macfarlane - Macgregor

Surname Forename Rank Home Relationship
Macfarlane Andrew Major (Rev) Inverness Brothers 1
Macfarlane Not stated CSM Glasgow Father/Son 2
Macfarlane J G Private Glasgow  2
Macfarlane James Captain Inverness  1
Macfarlane John A Not stated South Africa
ex-Inverness
 1
Macfarlane Walter M Not stated Canada 
ex-Inverness
 1
Macgillivray Alexander Sergeant Dingwall Brothers 3
Macgillivray Angus Private Evanton Brothers 4
Macgillivray Donald Sergeant Dingwall  3
Macgillivray Donald Private Evanton  4
Macgillivray J S Lieutenant Canada
ex-Fairburn
 
Macgillivray John Sergeant Tain  
Macgillivray William T Sergeant Elgin  
McGinn Not stated L/Corporal Delny  
McGlashan Harry D L/Corporal Canada
ex-Saltburh
 
Macgregor Donald E F  2/Lieutenant Evanton  
Macgregor Duncan Private Badcaul  
Macgregor John Lieutenant Dingwall Brothers 5
Macgregor Murdo Bombardier Dingwall  5
Macgregor Roderick Private Dingwall  5
Macgregor Simon Sergeant Edderton  
Macgregor William L/Corporal Dingwall  5

Date of Paper:  08.03.1918
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name(s):  Andrew
Rank:  Major (Rev.)
Regiment:  2nd Black Watch
Home Address:  Ness House, Inverness

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of the late Rev. John Macfarlane, so long the esteemed minister of Urray, Ross-shire, and of Mrs Macfarlane, Ness House, Inverness. All four sons have taken part in the war, and, as recently announced, the Distinguished Service Order has been conferred on the Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, Chaplain to the Forces, who has seen much service both East and West.
The Rev. Andrew Macfarlane, M.A., B.D., the eldest son, who has been awarded the D.S.O. for work in Mesopotamia, is senior chaplain, Church of Scotland, Amarah. Mr Macfarlane was a distinguished student of Glasgow University, where he graduated in Arts and Divinity, taking a specially high place in the classes devoted to Oriental studies. He was assistant at Largs and afterwards at the Cathedral, Glasgow, and was ordained there by the Rev. Dr McAdam Muir for work as a Colonial Chaplain at Secunderbad, in Sept., 1902. He has been a chaplain on the Indian Ecclestical Establishment since 1903. In 1905 he was gazetted to the Royal Highlanders, 2nd Black Watch, and served with his regiment in various parts of India. In the present war he served in France from October 1914 to November 1915, and so is eligible for the 1914 Star. He has been in Mesopotamia since the beginning of 1916, and has been at the fighting front with his regiment from the first advance of General Aylmer's force in the attempt to relieve Kut, up to the capture of Baghdad. He was twice mentioned in the dispatches of Sir Percy Lake in 1916. More recently he has held the position, with the rank of Major, as senior chaplain to the forces, Presbyterian, with the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force.
Captain James Macfarlane, second son of Mrs Macfarlane, is superintending engineer with Messrs Cowie & Co., Rangoon, and has been mobilised there in the Defence Force since the outbreak of war.
Mr John Adam Macfarlane, third son, National Bank of South Africa, went through most of the East African campaign serving with the Sportsmen's Battalion, 9th South African Infantry, until his health broke down, when ultimately he resumed his civil duties.
Mr Walter Macfarlane, the youngest son, came from Vancouver with the 62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He was severely wounded in the Somme battles, and was in hospital for a considerable time. He is at present on duty in a Canadian Shipping Office in London

Date of Paper:  08.03.1918
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name(s):  James
Rank:  Captain
Regiment:  Defence Force, Rangoon
Home Address:  Ness House, Inverness

Date of Paper:  08.03.1918
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name(s):  John Adam
Rank:  Not stated
Regiment:  9th South African Infantry
Home Address:  Ness House, Inverness

Date(s) of Paper:  08.03.1918
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name:  Walter Malcolm
Rank:  Not stated
Regiment:  62nd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force
Home Address:  Ness House, Inverness

Date of Paper:  10.12.1915
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name(s):  Not known
Rank:  Company Sergeant Major
Regiment:  Home Defence Corps
Home Address:  29, Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow

4202 Private J. G. Macfarlane, No. 2 Coy., who was gassed on 25th September, is in hospital in Beds., England, and is progressing favourably. Previous to the war, Private Macfarlane, who is 18 years of age, was a seaman to trade, and was employed on one of the Donaldson liners. He was an enthusiastic territorial, and was a member of the 5th Highland Light Infantry, but he transferred to the 4th Seaforths, in which battalion his father is a company sergt.-major.
Pte. Macfarlane's home address is 29 Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow, and sympathy is extended to his mother in her anxiety.
Company Sergeant Major Macfarlane, the father of Private Macfarlane, was 12 months in the Home Defence Corps during the Boer War. Previous to August 1914, he was a yarn storeman with Mr John Clachann, Ingram Street, Glasgow, and was employed in the G.P.O. at nights.

Date of Paper:  10.12.1915
Surname:  Macfarlane
First Name(s):  J. G.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  4th Seaforths
Home Address:  29, Harlaw Street, Port Dundas, Glasgow

Date of Paper:  10.03.1916 and 21.09.1918
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  B (Dingwall) Coy., Seaforths
Home Address:  Victoria Place, Dingwall

Macgillivray, Sergt. Alexander, 1832, B (Dingwall) Coy., wounded 10th March, died 12th March, 1915; aged 28 years; elder son of Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, Victoria Place, Dingwall. Rejoined on mobilisation. Clerk to the late ex-Provost John Macrae, solicitor, Dingwall, and subsequently with Messrs C & J Urquhart, ironmongers, Dingwall. Well- known vocalist.

[21.09.1918]
THE LATE SGT. D. MACGILLIVRAY, DINGWALL
As was briefly reported last week, a second great sorrow has befallen Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, Victoria Place, Dingwall, whose well-beloved son, Sgt. Donald Macgillivray, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action on the Western Front on 2nd September. Writing to the mother on 8th inst., the O/C of the dead soldier's company says: "Dear Mrs Macgillivray - I am afraid that you will have already received the sad news of the death of your son. I write to give you what information I may and to offer you what consolation I can. On the night of the 2nd inst. a shell burst on company headquarters and Sgt. Macgillivray, with several others, was killed on the spot. I saw them all immediately afterwards, and I could find no trace of wounds on your son. He was quite dead, with his friend, Sgt. Cameron, on the one side and the Company Sergt. Major on the other. All three had died through the concussion due to the bursting of the shell. They were buried next morning in the grey of the dawn and now proper crosses stand at the head of each grave. I knew your son in the 14th, and he was one of my best and trusted sergeants here. In addition to his [obliterated] and abilities as a soldier, I admired the cleanliness and uprightrness of the man. He was a truly excellent example of a soldier and a gentleman. We miss him very much in the company. I am the only officer left who knew him well, and I extend to you my sincerest sympathy in your great sorrow. May the great Consoler be close to you and in your grief may you know God's peace."
His officer's letter speaks well and gracefully and with tenderness and understanding of the late Sergt. Donald Macgillivray, and he leaves to those who knew him only as a bright, intelligent, happy youth, very little to say. Donald Macgillivray was a dutiful, loyal, and kindly son, whose tenderness to the home intensified with the passing of his brother, Sergt. Alex. Macgillivray, Seaforths, one of a bright band of Dingwall youths who hastened to the colours on the call to arms and who made the supreme sacrifice on the blood soaked fields of Neuve Chapelle.
The Chaplain of the battalion (Rev. Wm. Jardine), in a letter to Mrs Macgillivray, says: "I knew Sergt. Macgillivray well. He was one of the well-known figures in the battalion, and was a general favourite. We are all very sorry about his death, and I am writing in name of a great many people in conveying this message of sympathy. I know his death will be a dreadful blow to you. I trust that you may have the comfort of God in your sore sorrow, and that you may be able to cherish the hope that we have in Jesus Christ [obliterated]."

Date of Paper:  10.03.1916 and 21.09.1918
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address:  Victoria Place, Dingwall

Date of Paper:  02.05.1919
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Lovat Scouts
Home Address:  Kinveachy Porter Lodge, Aviemore (formerly Cracroft, Station Road, Evanton

LOVAT SCOUT SHARPSHOOTER
Private Donald Macgillivray, Lovat Scouts Sharp Shooters, whose photograph is reproduced above, is a son of Mr Angus Macgillivray, Cracroft, Station Road, Evanton. Pte. Macgillivray, who is 39 years of age and resides with his wife and two children at Kinveachy Porter Lodge, Aviemore, is a gamekeeper in the employment of Sir Spencer M. Wilson, Bart., Kinveachy Forest, Aviemore. Enlisting in October 1918, he was over 18 months in France, serving through the German offensive in March 1918, and in the subsequent British offensive which ended in the Artmistice being signed last November. He was principally engaged in observation work for both the infantry and artillery. He is now demobilised and has returned to his duties.
A brother, Pte. Angus Macgillivray, 1/4th Seaforths, laid down his life for his country on 8th November, 1915.

Date of Paper: 02.05.1919
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  Angus
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Cracroft, Station Road, Evanton

Date of Paper:  27.10.1916
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  J. S.
Rank:  Second Lieutenant
Regiment:  Seaforth Highlanders
Home Address:  Canada (formerly Fairburn)

Official intimation has just come to hand of the death in action on 14th July of Second-Lieutenant J. S. Macgillivray, Seaforth Highlanders, previously reported wounded on that date.
Lieut. Macgillivray was the third son of Mr Angus Macgillivray, late of Fairburn, Muir of Ord, now in Winnipeg, Canada. He enlisted in the Royal Scots Greys in the year 1905, and rose to the rank of sergeant. At the outbreak of war he went with that famous regiment to France, and was wounded in the retreat from Mons, and invalided home. Rejoining his regiment, he took part in several trench engagements.
In April of this year he was promoted Second-Lieutenant for service in the field, and transferred to the Seaforth Highlanders.
His brother officers spoke highly of his capabilities as an officer, and all ranks much regret his death in action at the head of his men.
The King and Queen have graciously sent a telegram of condolence to the sorrowing parents regretting deeply the loss sustained by them and the Army by the death of their son in the service of his country.
Although reported wounded on that date, the following letter to Lieut. Macgillivray's sister, from an officer of the Black Watch, amply proves that he had made the great sacrifice for King and Country: "I send you herewith a watch belonging to Lieut. John Macgillivray, and a letter from you to him, both of which were found on the body of the dead officer by a burying party sent out by my company in Longeval on 16th July last. I have just been discharged from hospital, and, on looking over my belongings, came across these articles, which I know would be prized by Lieut. Macgillivray's relatives. I did not know him personally, and can give you no information about him."
A brother officer, writing to Lieut. Macgillivray's sister, says: "I was in command of the camp in the fight. Mac and I were the only two left out of four officers. I was on the right of the company, and the left flank had to come up a bit to get in line with me. Your brother led this advance against the house, in which were Germans, with his usual dash and courage. He was hit in this charge but kept going on till he was hit again, and, as far as I could hear, he was hit three times. At that point we were held up, and as soon as I heard he was hit I sent out some men to find him and bring him in, but they came back and said the place about where he was was full of snipers. After we settled down I went myself to try and find him, but though I stayed a long time I could find no trace of him at all. Just then I got a new attack to make, so I had to be on the move again. In this attack I got four hits, and was taken down the line. So ended the show as far as I can tell you. This was all near Longeval and Delville Wood on the 14th July.
"I assure you I feel very much for you at this time, as Mac was my best friend in the battalion ever since he joined up. We were always together, and when in billet we either slept together or shared a room. He was older and had more experience than I had, and was at all times a perfect host in himself, and inspired confidence. None of us were chicken-hearted, and so all went well with our company. His own men loved him, and would have gone anywhere with him. Cool and collected under the most cruel fire, he scoffed at death on all occasions, and set the finest example one could imagine. Well do I remember when we took a rest in the advance - we had to go 800 yards over open ground - we lit our cigarettes together in No Man's Land, and advanced to the Boche's line smoking.
"His experience in France we all knew, but he was reluctant to speak of what he had done, but very often he said he would never be a prisoner. One Macgillivray had already died in German hands, he said, and there never would be a second. Modest and absolutely fearless, he seemed quite at home under a hail of bullets, and nothing would upset him. He had a short way with Germans; and I assure you many went down before he fell himself.
"If it be that he is gone, I offer you my deepest sympathy, and knowing your brother as I did, I am sure he is not the one to be taken prisoner unless he was badly wounded. He was a true friend, at all times open and sincere. I have lost many a 'pal' in the war, but none so dear as he. A soldier of the first water, he will be missed by officers and men who are left, for he was popularity itself. Wherever he went he always showed the true spirit of the good British officer and gentleman that he was."
Private Angus Macgillivray, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Macgillivray, who was with the 100th Grenadiers, Canadian Expeditionary Force, was reported missing in April 1915, and has since been officially reported killed.
Another son, Bombardier W. S. Macgillivray, is with the Artillery, while a sister is nursing the wounded.
Many people in the Fairburn district remember the Macgillivray family, including the deceased officer, and genuine sympathy [remainder obliterated].

Date of Paper:  12.05.1916
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  John
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Not stated
Home Address:  12, Lamington Street, Tain

Macgillivray, Sergt. John, 940, son of Mr John Macgillivray, 12 Lamington Street, Tain, was in the service of the Post Office, which he entered after leaving the school. First telegraphic messenger, he became established postman at Cullicudden, and subsequently transferred to Tain, performing his duties with great acceptability. A good cyclist, he was a distinguished football player. Served with the battalion from mobilisation till he fell.

Date of Paper:  21.10.1917
Surname:  Macgillivray
First Name(s):  William T.
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Royal Gun Artillery
Home Address:  Elgin (formerly Alness)

Sergt. William T. MacGillivray, R.G.A., has died of wounds received in action, surviving but a few hours the effects of a German shell. A native of Alness, where he was born 32(?) years ago, for many years he was water bailiff with Sir Kenneth Mackenzie of Gairloch, and resided at Poolewe, where he was well known. Leaving Poolewe he went to Glasgow as an Inspector of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, transferring later on to Elgin, where he had been for seven years, and where his widow resides. Sergt. MacGillivray joined up about two years ago, and had been in France since June last. He was held in high esteem in his battery. In a letter, his Major says he was one of the finest and noblest characters in the battery, and that by his splendid example and clean life he had won the admiration of all who knew him. His last words were: "Remember me to all at home, and good luck to the Twentieth."
Two brothers - Lieutenant John MacGillivray and Corporal Angus MacGillivray - have been killed in action, and the father, who was well known in the Muir of Ord district, died in Canada only a month ago.
The deepest sympathy goes out to his widowed mother, who is a sister of the Rev. Alex. Stuart, Fountainbridge Free Church, Edinburgh, to his young widow and only son, and to his five sisters and only surviving brother, Mr Duncan MacGillivray, in New Zealand.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  McGinn
First Name(s):  Not stated
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Cameron Highlanders
Home Address:  Kindeace Mains, Delny

DELNY CAMERON MISSING
As reported recently, Mrs McGinn, Kindeace Mains, Delny, received information that her husband, 20435 L./Corpl. McGinn, Camerons, is missing and believed to be a prisoner of war. Any information will be gratefully received.
L./Cpl. McGinn has seen a great deal of service. He shared the hardships and the rigorous campaigning at Gallipoli, where he was wounded. Returning to England, on recovering, he was once more put under orders for active service, and proceeded to France in 1916. There he saw much of the heavy fighting in which the Camerons have borne their full share, escaping often marvellously without a scratch until March, when he was posted missing as stated. From letters received Mrs McGinn has good hopes that her husband may be a prisoner of war, but, as mentioned, any further information will be gratefully received.
A photo appears today.
[Handwritten note: "P. of War 21.6.18"]

Date of Paper:  07.07.1916
Surname:  McGlashan
First Name(s):  Harry Dundas
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Canadian Rifles
Home Address:  Calgary, Alberta, Canada (formerly Saltburn, Invergordon)

SALTBURN CANADIAN KILLED
Lance-Corporal Harry Dundas McGlashan, 117386, Canadian (M) Rifles, was killed in action on June 2nd, 1916. He was killed instantly by a shell whilst assisting a wounded comrade close by the dressing station. In September 1915 Lance-Corporal McGlashan joined the Canadian (M) Rifles, and came over to England in October. At the end of January he went out to the front. He belonged to Saltburn, Invergordon, and was educated at Invergordon Academy. Five years ago he went to Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where he was employed in the City Hall as accountant. He was of a most noble disposition, and was never happier than when thinking and doing for others. He was 23 years of age.
Much sympathy is extended to his sorrowing mother, sisters, and brother, who now reside in Calgary. A photo of deceased appears today.

Date of Paper:  15.06.1917
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  Donald Edward Francis
Rank:  Second Lieutenant
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Evanton

2/LT. MACGREGOR, M.C., SEAFORTHS
A photograph of 2/Lieut. E. D. Macgregor, Seaforths, who has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in the recent fighting at Arras, appears today. Lt. Macgregor's home is at Evanton, Ross-shire. He was wounded in the head on the occasion on which he displayed great gallantry, but has made a capital recovery, and, after a few days spent at his home, he returned last week to duty, reporting at the Reserve centre somewhere in England. Lt. Macgregor is well known in Evanton and Dingwall. He was in the County Clerk's Office in Dingwall before the war, and received a commission in the county regiment in 1915, serving for a time with the 2/4ths, and ultimately crossing to France, where he has seen a good deal of fighting since the British began to assert a superiority which could not be professed earlier in the war. He is a smart, keen young officer, who holds the confidence of his men and enjoys popularity among his brother officers.
[Handwritten notes: "Wounded 21.11.17. 7.12.17 died at Fulham Road Hospital, London. Donald Edward Francis Macgregor, M.C., Captain 1/4th Seaforths. Wife Ruth Beynon. Youngest son of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Station Terrace, Dornoch, and late of Evanton."]

Date of Paper:  08.03.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  Duncan
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Machine Gun Corps
Home Address:  Badcaul

A photograph is reproduced today of Pte. Duncan McGregor, Machine Gun Corps, who died lately in Sheffield Hospital of pneumonia. Before answering his country's call, Pte. McGregor was road contractor on the Garve to Ullapool road, where he had many hard fights with the elements, when snows blocked his section. When freed for military service, he joined the 4th Seaforths. An excellent marksman, after training he was sent for a special course with the Machine Gun Corps in Nottinghamshire. Contracting measles, pneumonia supervened. During his last days, his father, Mr Rod. McGregor, Badcaul, was sent for, and reached his son a few hours before the end. The remains of deceased were brought home, and laid to rest in the family burying ground at Gruinard. Great sympathy is felt for his parents and other members of the family, four of whom, two brothers and sisters, are in British Columbia. Pte. McGregor is deeply regretted in the scenes of his boyhood, as well as by those who knew him on the Dheirie road, and his cheery manner and kindly ways will long be remembered.

Date of Paper:  05.04.1918 and 15.11.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  John
Rank:  Lieutenant
Regiment:  Canadian Infantry
Home Address:  Burn Place, Dingwall

There is reproduced today photographs of four sons of Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Burn Place, Dingwall, all of whom, like so many more in the North, voluntarily went to war in the earlier days of it or joined up as they reached the age.
Lt. John Macgregor, Canadian Infantry, is well remembered by Dingwall folk. Before going to Canada he was a clerk with Messrs Duncan & Duncan, solicitors. While in Dingwall he took a deep interest in various organisations in the old town by the Peffery. He was a member of the old Operatic Society, the Gaelic choir, the darkie troupe, and shared in many other efforts in his native town. He also took a keen interest in sport, being secretary of the old-time Victoria United Football Club, and a member of the Wester Ross shinty team. When war broke out, the old Highland spirit showed up, with the result that he crossed to England and thence to France. While there he showed great ability, attaining the rank of sergeant. About two years ago he was recommended for a commission. He is at present under medical treatment, having broken his ankle while instructing in trenching.
Bom. Murdo Macgregor, R.G.A., has, perhaps, seen more service than any of the brothers. Before the war he joined the Ross Mountain Battery. At mobilisation he went to Galipoli with his unit, taking part in the landing there. After the evacuation Bom. Macgregor went to Egypt, and subsequently to Salonica, where he has been for some considerable time. Few young soldiers have seen as much service as Murdo, and everybody will wish him the best of luck, and - "Leave" to which so far he has been a stranger.
L./Cpl. William Macgregor, the youngest of the family, is at present somewhere in Scotland with the Seaforths. He served with Messrs. D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., until he came of military ge, and thereupon joined the Army. He was home recently on leave. He makes a typical Highland soldier, and he received many congratulations on his promotion to L./Cpl., after so short a time in the Army.
Another son, Pte. Roderick Macgregor, mobilised with the County Territorials at the outbreak of war, went to France in 1914, and served there until invalided, when he returned to civil life, in which he is a grocer.
Mr and Mrs Macgregor may well feel proud of their boys, and all friends of the family will wish them a speedy return to their native town.

[15.11.1918]
Mr and Mrs Macgregor, Ward Cottage, Burn Place, Dingwall, as briefly announced last week, have received a letter from an officer of the battalion which confirms their fears that their son, Lce.-Corpl. William Macgregor, 25136, Seaforths, was killed in action. It will be recalled that a soldier with a Dingwall connection found Lce.-Cpl. Macgregor's pocket book in the field, and very kindly sent it home through his sister, a Dingwall lady, stating that he got it near a body which he believed to be that of L./Cpl. Macgregor. Lt. J. A. Mackenzie, Seaforths, now writes stating that L.-Cpl. Macgregpr was killed in action on October 1 during an advance in Flanders, and was buried by his comrades, under the superintendence of Lt. A. J. Macdonald, Seaforths (Tulloch, Dingwall). "His death is a great loss to me," Lt. Mackenzie writes. "He was in every way a splendid soldier, and quite fearless. During the earlier stages of the attack he actually started off to tackle a pill box on his own account, and I had to call him back while I collected men to assist him. He had spoken to me of his desire to obtain a commission, and I had asked him to obtain all the necessary papers, and was prepared to assist him in every way, and had intended promoting him to the rank of corporal at the earliest opportunity. I am personally exceedingly sorry he did not come through and I send you my sincerest sympathy."
Lance-Corpl. Macgregor's death will occasion much sincere sorrow to all who knew him. A singularly bright, handsome, manly, smart boy, it seems just the other day since, one of the office staff of Messrs D. Mackintosh & Co., of Dingwall, Ltd., he was hurrying hither and thither on the work of the firm. Later, on leave, everyone remarked on the boy who had suddenly taken the physique and bearing of a man. He was unquestionably as smartly turned out and as well set up, and wore, first, the Argyll and Sutherland, and, latterly, the Seaforth tartans, with all the finished bearing of the aforetime regular. Even before he crossed to France he was marked out for commissioned rank, and the necessary forms were in process of completion, and were on the way to France when he fell. In their bereavement Mr and Mrs Macgregor and family have the full sympathy of the community. Four sons of the family have served with the colours. Captain John Macgregor is with the Canadians; Bom. Murdo Macgregor, Ross Mountain Battery, is temporarily demobilised for special work; and Roderick Macgregor, who crossed to France with the Seaforths in 1914, was subsequently invalided out of the Army.

Date of Paper:  05.04.1918 and 15.11.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  Murdo
Rank:  Bombardier
Regiment:  Royal Gun Artillery
Home Address:  Burn Place, Dingwall

Date of Paper:  05.04.1918 and 15.11.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  Roderick
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Burn Place, Dingwall

Date of Paper:  05.04.1918 and 15.11.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  William
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Burn Place, Dingwall

Date of Paper:  15.03.1918
Surname:  Macgregor
First Name(s):  Simon
Rank:  Sergeant Major
Regiment:  4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Edderton

There is reproduced today a photograph of Sergt.-Major Simon Macgregor, 4th Seaforths, who recently won the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry at Cambrai, and who, as reported last week, was presented with a gold watch by the people of his native parish of Edderton, Ross-shire, at a ceremony attended by both his parents. There is the strong Highland blood in the veins of Sergt.-Major Macgregor and his forebears were distinguished in war. Three of his uncles served in the Army and shared in the fighting at the Crimea and the Indian Mutiny.
His brother, Alexander, has been three times wounded in the present war, and, for 24 hours, was actually a prisoner of war in German hands but happily escaped. That was during the retreat from Mons. Sergt.-Major Macgregor mobilised with the 1/4 Seaforths in August 1914, and proceeded to France on 4th November of that year, thus qualifying for the 1914 Star given to men forming part of the First Seven Divisions. He has been on active service throughout and only once was slightly wounded. It is understood that Sergt.-Major Macgregor received the D.C.M. for having, at a critical moment , when his officers were casualties, taken over command of the men of two companies, and successfully extricated them from a difficult situation. He is a popular personality in the battalion and the award of the D.C.M. gave the utmost satisfaction to all ranks. Sergt.-Major Macgregor received the congratulations of the Major General commanding the Division.

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