World War 1

War Records 1914-18


Private Alexander Falconer


Private Donald Falconer


Sergeant A J Fanning, DCM


Corporal K Fanning


Sergeant Robert Carlton Feltus, MSM


Private Thomas J Ferguson


Private Allan Finlay


Private Henry Finlay, MM


Private John Finlay


Bombardier Alexander Finlayson


Lance Corporal Angus Finlayson


Private David Finlayson


Private Donald Finlayson


Private Duncan Finlayson


Sergeant William Finlayson


Lieutenant David Fleming, Croix de Guerre


Bombardier Alexander Forbes


Corporal Donald W Forbes


Private George Forbes


Sergeant Ivy Forbes


Private James Forbes (Nigg)


Private James F Forbes (Cromarty)


Sergeant Nellie Forbes


Gunner Roderick F Forbes


Corporal George Forsyth


Corporal Rowallan Forsyth


Private William James Forsyth (Invergordon)


Private John Fowler (Culbokie)


Captain (Sir) John Fowler (Ullapool)


Sergeant William Fowler

Surname F


Surname Forename(s) Rank Home Relationship
Falconer Alexander Private Maryburgh Brothers 1
Falconer Donald Private Maryburgh  1
Fanning A J Sergeant Munlochy Brothers 2
Fanning K Corporal Munlochy  2
Feltus Robert C Sergeant Avoch  
Ferguson Thomas J Private Alness  
Finlay Allan Private Invergordon Brothers 3
Finlay Henry Private Invergordon  3
Finlay John Private Invergordon  3
Finlayson Alexander Bombardier Dingwall  
Finlayson  Angus L/Corporal Achnasheen  
Finlayson David Private Alness  
Finlayson Donald Private Kishorn Brothers 4
Finlayson Duncan Private Canada
ex-Dingwall
 
Finlayson Hector Sergeant Dingwall  
Finlayson J Corporal Kishorn  4
Finlayson M A Gunner Kishorn  4
Finlayson William Sergeant Kishorn  
Fleming David Lieutenant Avoch  
Forbes Alexander Bombardier Cromarty Brothers/Sisters 5
Forbes Donald W Corporal Cromarty  5
Forbes George Private Nigg Brothers 6
Forbes Ivy Sergeant Cromarty  5
Forbes James Private Nigg  6
Forbes James F Private Cromarty  5
Forbes Nellie Sergeant Cromarty  5
Forbes Roderick F Gunner Cromarty  5
Forsyth George Corporal Tore Brothers 7
Forsyth Rowallan Corporal Tore  7
Forsyth William L/Corporal Tore  7
Forsyth William J Private Invergordon  
Fowler John Private Culbokie Brothers 8
Fowler John Captain (Sir) Ullapool  
Fowler William Sergeant Culbokie  8
Page 02        
Fraser Alexander Private Conon  
Fraser Alexander Driver Dingwall Brothers 9
Fraser D Driver Muir of Ord Brothers 10
Fraser Daniel Corporal Dingwall  9
Fraser Donald Private Conon Brothers 11
Fraser Donald Piper Contin  
Fraser Donald Private Dingwall  
Fraser Farquhar Private Muir of Ord  10
Fraser Gilbert Captain Dingwall  
Fraser H L/Corporal Poolewe  
Fraser Hugh Private Kildary Brothers 12
Fraser Hugh Corporal Muir of Ord  10
Fraser Hugh J Corporal Conon  11
Fraser J Gunner Alness  
Fraser J L/Corporal Gairloch  
Fraser J Sergeant Kildary  12
Fraser James Private Dingwall Brothers 13
Fraser John Private Conon Brothers 14
Fraser John Private Culbokie  
Fraser John Private Evanton Brothers 15
Fraser Leslie Private Evanton  
Fraser Roderick QMS Alness  
Fraser Simon Private Kildary  12
Fraser T Gunner Lochcarron  
Fraser W D L/Corporal Muir of Ord  
Fraser  W J Corporal Nigg  
Fraser William Sergeant Conon  14
Fraser William Private Canada
ex-Dingwall
 13
Fraser William Corporal Australia
ex-Evanton
 15
French R Douglas Lieutenant London  
Fridge Angus Private Tain Brothers 16
Fridge William Corporal Tain  16

Date of Paper:  23.08.1918
Surname:  Falconer
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Red House, Maryburgh.

MARYBURGH NURSE'S SACRIFICE
Of three sons of the late Mr Adam Falconer, farmer, Laid, Clyth, Caithness, and Mrs Falconer, nurse, Red House, Maryburgh, two have served with the colours, and, as formerly announced, one of the two soldier sons (whose photos. appear to-day) died of wounds on August 3rd, 1917.
The eldest son of the family is Mr William Falconer, headmaster, Mid Clyth Public School.
The second son, 200530 Pte. Alex. Falconer, Seaforths, joined the Ross-shire Territorials in January, 1917. Trained at Ripon, he went to France in May following, and had been only three times up the line when he was wounded and succumbed to his injuries in No. 4 Casualty Clearing Station on 3rd August, 1917. A fine quiet, mannerly young soldier, 23 years of age, he was a ploughman with Mr Ross, Balachraggan, Kildary, when he joined the colours.
Pte. Donald Falconer, Seaforths, is only 18 years of age, and interrupted a promising educational career as a student to join the Army. He is training at Glencorse.

Date of Paper:  23.08.1918
Surname:  Falconer
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Red House, Maryburgh.

Date of Paper:  28.11.1917
Surname:  Fanning
First Name(s):  A. J.
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Seaforths / Royal Engineers
Home Address:  Allangrange, Munlochy.

Sergeant A. J. Fanning, R.E, son of Mr and Mrs Fanning, Allangrange, Ross-shire, has been awarded the D.C.M. for an act of bravery he performed on the 28th June 1917. Sergeant Fanning joined the Seaforths in September, 1914, and went to France with the Territorial Battalion in November of the same year. He was transferred to the Royal Engineers in February, 1916. He was slightly wounded on the 27th April, but still remained on duty.
Sergt. Fanning is now in hospital in France, but his many friends wish him a speedy recovery.
His younger brother, Corporal Kenneth Fanning, who has been on active service with the Seaforths since June, 1916, has just returned to the firing line after a ten days' leave.
Photographs of the two brothers will be found on this page.

Date of Paper:  28.11.1917
Surname:  Fanning
First Name(s):  Kenneth
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Allangrange, Munlochy.

Date of Paper:  27.12.1918
Surname:  Feltus
First Name(s):  Robert Carlton
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Canadian Army Service Corps
Home Address:  1, Rose Street, Avoch.

CANADIAN'S SAD DEATH
While the bells were ringing their joyful tidings that hostilities had ended, news came to Avoch, Ross-shire, that No. 331132 Sergeant Robert Carlton Feltus, M.S.M., Canadian Army Service Corps, died in hospital at Camiers, France, on November 5th, from influenza. He was in his 30th year. The youngest son of the late Mr W. Carlton Feltus, and Mrs Feltus, Beebe, Stanstead, County Quebec, Canada, he is the husband of Mrs Helen Feltus, at present residing at 1 Rose St., Avoch.
Prior to his enlistment, Sergeant Carlton Feltus was in an automobile business in Winnipeg, and while there he first met his wife, whom he married at Avoch sixteen months ago. That was his first visit to Scotland. He was once home again on leave, and seemed a fine soldierly Canadian, and one willing to do his share in the war. Sergt. Feltus received the Meritorious Service Medal in June this year. The sympathy of those who knew him is now extended to his young widow and relatives abroad.
Mrs Feltus has received many expressions of sympathy, including a message from the King and Queen. Lt. Heron Hudson, in a letter to the widow, says: "Dear Mrs Feltus - Major Harris tells me that he has broken the news of your great loss to you, and as one who new him better than the Major, I am writing these lines to express my sympathy for your loss. Your husband was with my section both as a corporal and sergeant. During all that time he has worked quietly and steadily, setting an example both to me and my section, of coolness and disregard of danger. Two occasions stand out most clearly in my memory, and are an example of what he has been doing whilst with this unit. At Passchendaele, in the fall of 1917, we were hauling engineers material through St. Jean and Wielize to a dump named Kansas Cross. The road leading to it was made was made of planks just wide enough for two lorries abreast, and was systematically shelled. It was here he earned the M.S.M., which he did not received till some time later, and I can assure you it was well earned.
"Two days out of three he would be working along this road, and on many occasions helped drivers to get their trucks out of difficult and dangerous places. On another occasion during the Amiens show this summer he showed his disregard of danger. Two lorries of this unit lost their way and were stopped by machine gun fire in No Man's Land, one driver being killed and the other badly wounded. I was detailed to save those lorries, and took three men with me. On the way up we meet Bob coming back after having been up to examine the lorries, but was unable to get near them in daylight. Without a word he joined our party, although he had been out all day. On arriving at the place where the lorries were, I stopped to examine the first one, but Bob went ahead, and with the aid of Corpl. Mackenzie pushed the second lorry back out of No Man's Land, and thus enabled us to tow both lorries back. The Germans had machine guns trained on the road, and if they had seen or heard anything they would certainly have opened fire.
"His death was a great blow to me, as in him the unit lost a real man, whilst I lost a friend. What it must be to you I cannot imagine, but I hope you will accept these assurances of my sympathy and grief. I find it hard to express my feelings in a letter, but if there is anything I can do to soften the blow, don't hesitate to let me know."
Major E. M. Harris, in a letter, writes:
"We all feel his loss very much, and his conduct during the time I knew him was exemplary whenever called upon for any duty. He was always willing and cheerful to go, and his bravery was unequalled. He is greatly missed by all his section and by the officers with whom he came in contact, and, in fact, by the whole company."
Driver D. Cameron, a personal friend, writes: "I have always admired him for his staunchness, courage, fidelity, and kindness. Words are of little avail in assuaging the grief caused by such a loss but I trust that later, when perspective lends a clearer vision, you will be comforted by the assurance that your husband did his part so nobly during these years of war before he was called upon to make the supreme sacrifice."
A photo appears to-day.

Date of Paper:  26.10.1917
Surname:  Ferguson
First Name(s):  Thomas J.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths / Argyle & Sutherland
Home Address:  Millcraig, Alness.

Regret is everywhere expressed at the news received last week that Private Tom. J. Ferguson, Seaforths (attached to the Argyle and Sutherlands), had been killed in the recent successful advance. He was born at Dunballoch, Beauly, and would have only reached his 20th birthday next month. He was the eldest son of Mr Donald Ferguson, cattleman, Millcraig, Alness, who is a native of Dunvegan, Isle of Skye, but who has served in many farms in Inverness and Ross during the past 27 years.
Deepest sympathy is extended to him and the other members of his family in their great loss. Private Ferguson was a very fine young fellow, and a general favourite with all his friends and associates. He carried his popularity with him into the Army, as the following letter, which has been received from his Captain, shows.
Captain Mackenzie writes as follows: "It is with great sorrow that I have to break to you the sad news of your son's death in the recent fighting. He was killed in action by a fragment of shell on the 23rd of this month, and death was instantaneous. Just previously he had being doing fine work at his post of duty in the front line at a very trying time. I know how little any words of mine can help you to bear the sad news, but I wish to let you know that, in your great loss, you have the sincere sympathy of all your boy's comrades and his officers. We miss him greatly; how great your loss is we can only imagine. Your boy was a great favourite with us all. It may help you to know that the good work done by your son and his comrades was of particular value at one stage of the present battle; and such deeds all help to bring this awful war to an end. Your son is one of the many who have given their lives for others. May you find strength and consolation in your great loss."
A photograph is reproduced to -day.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Finlay
First Name(s):  Allan
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Argyll and Sutherlands
Home Address:  Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

THREE SOLDIER SONS OF ALNESS
Mr and Mrs John Finlay, Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon, have three sons in the Army, all of whom before joining up were ploughmen with Mr A.T. Gill, Rosskeen Farm, and one of whom, who wears the Military Medal, recently reported missing, is now a prisoner of war in Germany. All three sons joined up in 1915, before the "suggestion of the Tribunal" came to help people.
Pte John Finlay, Camerons, was wounded on May 7, 1917, and after hospital treatment was posted to an agricultural company, for which his skill pre-eminently fits him.
Pte. Henry Finlay, M.M., joined the Lovat Scouts, and subsequently transferred to the Camerons. He saw much service, and was continuously at the front, except during a period when in hospital with trench feet. A splendid soldier, the fact he won the Military Medal for service in the field speaks of his valour and grit. Pte. Finlay took part in the early battles of the German offensive, and was posted missing on 28th March. Happily the anxiety of his family has been greatly relieved by a post card received last week that he is a prisoner of war and wounded in Germany. Of late, by all accounts, wounded prisoners in Germany receive good attention, and hope is that he may be soon restored to health and released.
Pte. Allan Finlay, Argyll and Sutherlands, who also joined up in 1915, was sent to France about two months ago, where he is meantime in hospital with a somewhat severe illness.
The record of the Finlay family is a proud one, and friends will hope that all three sons may return safely to their old friends and pursuits.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Finlay
First Name(s):  Henry
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Lovat Scouts / Camerons
Home Address:  Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Finlay
First Name(s):  John
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Camerons
Home Address:  Rosskeen Farm, Invergordon.

Date of Paper:  09.11.1917
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Bombardier
Regiment:  Royal Field Artillery
Home Address:  Pitglassie, Dingwall

As briefly recorded recently, Bombardier Alexander Finlayson, R.F.A., Pitglassie Dingwall, whose photograph appears to-day, died in a Casualty Clearing Station of wounds received in action. The circumstances connected with his death are pathetic and tragic. Home on leave, and married on Friday, he left for France on Monday, was in action on Thursday, and died of wounds on Friday, just a week after he wedded his young wife.
Deceased, who was 25 years of age, joined up early in August, 1914, answering the call instantly. He had been two years and three months on active service, and had shared in some of the bitterest fighting of the New Army. Originally a painter with Mr J. Ross, Dingwall, his health gave way, and he took to outdoor life. He was employed as a ploughman in the Black Isle, working at Kilcoy. When he joined up he was serving at Balloan.
The son of Mr Finlayson, cattleman, Pitglassie, his young widow, who was Miss Lizzie Paton, was a daughter of Mr Paton, cattleman, Ellis Farm, Avoch. She is employed in general service in the Black Isle. With the relatives there is widespread sympathy. Deceased, as his prompt response to the call to arms shows, and his splendid work with his battery proves, was a virile type of manhood, inspired by a chivalrous and patriotic sense of duty.

Date of Paper:  25.08.1916
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  Angus
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Royal Scots
Home Address:  Railway Cottages, Achnasheen.

ACHNASHEEN ROYAL SCOT KILLED
To-day we reproduce a portrait of Lance-Corp. Angus Finlayson, killed in action, the son of Mr and Mrs Finlayson, Railway Cottages, Achnasheen, a family resident in the district since the early days of the Dingwall and Skye railway. Twenty-eight years of age, Angus was the youngest son of the family. Three others are in Government service.
The oldest son came home from the Argentine, where he had been for two years on the railway, and is now on transport work on the Western front. "Lochbroom" was well known on the Highland system as a fearless and capable driver. In a letter written by Angus three days before he fell he said his battalion had been in the thick of the battle for ten days, and at the moment were resting.
Before joining up Private Angus Finlayson held a responsible appointment at Murthly. Previously he had been a porter at various stations on the Highland railway.
Deep sympathy is felt with his family.

Date of Paper:  11.04.1919
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  David
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Highland Light Infantry
Home Address:  Sea Shore, Alness.

THE LATE PTE. DAVID FINLAYSON, ALNESS
Above is reproduced a photograph of Private David Finlayson, Highland Light Infantry , youngest son of Mr and Mrs Finlayson, Sea Shore, Alness.
Pte. Finlayson was a fine type of soldier and a splendid marksman. He enlisted in the H.L.I. early in 1917, and went with his battalion to France in 1918. He saw some severe fighting, and was wounded. Unfortunately his wounds proved fatal, and he died on 29th September, 1918, at a clearing station behind the lines.
Much sympathy is felt for the sorrowing parents and family at home and abroad.

Date of Paper:  26.07.1918
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  Donald
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

KISHORN SEAFORTH'S DEATH
Pte. Donald Finlayson, Seaforths, who died at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, on 23rd June, 1918, from wounds received in action was the third son of the late Mr Malcolm Finlayson and Mrs Finlayson, Seafield Farm, Kishorn, Strathcarron. Twenty-eight years of age, before the war he was employed on Lochcarron estate, and was a member of Ross Mountain Battery, with which he mobilised at the outbreak of war. Time-expired two years ago, he rejoined for the duration of the war, but transferred to the 4th Seaforths, with which battalion he was trained in Scotland and at Ripon. He proceeded to France to be wounded very soon after, and was invalided home. He returned to the line again in 1917, in time to share in the battle of Arras in April,1917, and again severely wounded, he was invalided home.
In March last he returned to the Western Front for the third time, and shared in the great defensive actions. Mortally wounded on 22nd June, he passed away as stated, on 23rd June.   Deceased has left behind him very pleasant memories. A happy, joyous, obliging lad, when he reached man's estate he maintained the respect and esteem of all, and, besides his widowed mother and brothers and sisters, he leaves many friends who sincerely mourn his loss, and who will long recall the place he filled in the life of the district in those far off days of peace, and the nobility of his end.
Two brothers are serving with the Forces. Gunner M. A. Finlayson is in the New Zealand Field Artillery, and Corporal J. Finlayson is in the United States Signal Corps. in France.
A photo. of Private D. Finlayson appears in to-day's paper.

Date of Paper:  26.07.1918
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  J.
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  United States Signal Corps
Home Address:  Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

No photo avaliable.

Date of Paper:  26.07.1918
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  M. A.
Rank:  Gunner
Regiment:  New Zealand Field Artillery
Home Address:  Seafield Farm, Kishorn.

No photo avaliable.

Date of Paper:  06.10.1916
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  Duncan
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Canadians
Home Address:  Lochiel Place, Dingwall

THE LATE PTE. DUNCAN FINLAYSON
[See also Sergt. Hector Finlayson, Dingwall]
Above will be found a portrait of the late Private Duncan Finlayson, Canadians, who, as we reported in our issue of the 23rd inst., was killed in action on the 8th inst. In his 29th year, the deceased was the youngest son of the late Mr and Mrs Finlayson, Lochiel Place, Dingwall, and nephew of Mr and Mrs Hector Finlayson, 5 Blackwell Street, Dingwall.
A plasterer to trade, he was employed in Dingwall by Messrs Mackay & Sons. About 7 years ago he migrated to Canada, settling in Vancouver. On the outbreak of war he joined the Canadians, and crossed to England with the first contingent. He was over a year in France, during which time he spent a few days in Inverness and Dingwall, when on furlough.
His sister, Mrs Annie Cameron, was for a long period employed by Mr George Souter, stationer, at Dingwall and Strathpeffer.
Much sympathy is expressed with Mrs Cameron and his aunt and uncle and family in their sad loss.
A brother of the deceased, Private Donald Finlayson, is also serving with the colours.
The relatives of Pte. Finlayson have received a letter of sympathy from the Rt. Hon. Robert Munro, K.C., Lord Advocate [remainder missing].

Date of Paper:  06.10.1916
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  Hector
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Blackwell Street, Dingwall

[See also the late Private Duncan Finlayson, Dingwall]
A cousin of the deceased, of whom also we reproduce a photograph, is Sergeant Hector Finlayson, of the Seaforths, son of Mr and Mrs Finlayson, Blackwells Street, Dingwall, who is at present at home time-expired on a month's furlough, and who has voluntarily rejoined. A plumber to trade, Sergt. Finlayson was working in Invergordon when hostilities broke out. He immediately joined the Invergordon company, and proceeded to France in 1914, with his unit, and has been there ever since. His brother, Private Geo. Finlayson, was wounded at Neuve Chapelle, and has been discharged. He is now employed at Invergordon.

Date of Paper:  18.08.1916
Surname:  Finlayson
First Name(s):  William
Rank:  Lance-Sergeant
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Ardarroch, Kishorn.

THE LATE LCE.-SERGT. W. FINLAYSON
Above we reproduce the portrait of Lance-Sergt. Wm. Finlayson, Seaforths, who was killed in action on 26th July.
A son of Mr and Mrs Wm. Finlayson, Ardarroch, Kishorn, Sergt. Finlayson enlisted in December, 1914, shortly after his brother, Sergt. M. Finlayson, 2nd Seaforths, had been killed in action. After four months' training at Bedford, including three weeks at Chesea School of Instruction, he proceeded to France with the second draft in April, 1915. He was present in the trenches at Aubers Ridge on May 9th, and had been on the Western front ever since, except for ten days' leave at home in January last. He received his sergeant's stripes after a course of instruction in bomb-throwing, etc., in France, having previously given up his corporal stripes in order to get to the front.
He was 26 years of age.

Date of Paper:  27.09.1918
Surname:  Fleming
First Name(s):  David
Rank:  Lieutenant
Regiment:  Seaforths / Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Home Address:  The Schoolhouse, Avoch.

Lieutenant David Fleming, Seaforths, attached Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, has been home at Avoch on leave from France, looking very fit. He was awarded recently the French Croix de Guerre, 1st Class, with Palms, and his meritorious success adds to the many honours already won by the gallant 4th Seaforths, to which Lieut. Fleming was commissioned in 1915, after serving as a private in Royal Scots in France. Lieut. Fleming was slightly wounded. He is the only son of Mr and Mrs Fleming, The Schoolhouse, Avoch.   A photo of Lt. Fleming appears today.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  Alexander
Rank:  Bombardier
Regiment:  R.G.A.
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty

A PATRIOTIC CROMARTY FAMILY
The family of Mr and Mrs Colin Forbes, Ivy Cottage, Cromarty, have truly a splendid record of patriotic service in the great war. Four sons are serving with the Colours, one is the wearer of the coveted honour of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, while two young daughters are carrying on in munition works, helping to "deliver the goods" so necessary to the fighters on land and sea.
Pte. James F. Forbes, the eldest son, enlisted in the 1/4th Camerons in November 1914. Trained at Bedford, he joined the B.E.F. with the first draft which left in the Spring of 1915. The story of the 1/4th Camerons was brief and bright in France, but when it suffered from reconstruction processes Pte. Forbes remained a Cameron still, and has served throughout the Western Front. Before the war he was a ploughman with Mr Thomson, Poyntzfield.
The second son, Corpl. Donald W. Forbes, R.G.A., joined up in December [obliterated] when the call fell strongly on the [obliterated] of most young fellows. He was trained at Invergordon and in England, and in 1916 was sent to France. A brave, intrepid soldider, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field for "saving of a gun team [obliterated] in action, at great personal risk, and in the face of exceptionally heavy fire". Before the war he too was a ploughman at Poyntzfield Mains.
The third son, Bom. Alexander F. Forbes, R.G.A., joined up in the spring of 1915. Employed with a Government contractor at Invergordon, he left a "cushy" billet for the sterner task of war. Trained at Invergordon and in England, in June 1916 he went to the Western Front. He was wounded at the opening of the present offensive and is still under hospital treatment.
The fourth son, Gr. Roderick F. Forbes, R.G.A., joined up in the spring of 1915. He was then in the service of the Admiralty at Cromarty, being employed on the clerical staff, and, so to speak, well covered by the Government umbrella. Like his brother, he preferred a more active participation in the war. He too was trained at Invergordon and in England, where he remained until August 1917, when he went to France. Subsequently he proceeded to the Italian Front with his battery, and there he still remains.
Misses Nellie and Ivy F. Forbes have been on war work in a munition factory for over a year. That they are efficient workers and valued leaders is evidenced by the fact that they have both been given the rank of sergeant.
Mr and Mrs Forbes are to be congratulated on the patriotic spirit with which they have inspired their family, whose safe return from war all their friends join in wishing.
Photos of the brothers and sisters appear today.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  Donald W.
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  R.G.A.
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  Ivy
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Munitions
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  James F.
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  1/4th Camerons
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty.

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  Nellie
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  Munitions
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty

Date of Paper:  07.06.1918
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  Roderick F.
Rank:  Gunner
Regiment:  R.G.A.
Home Address:  Ivy Cottage, Cromarty.

Date of Paper:  08.06.1917
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  George
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Lovat Scouts /Gordons
Home Address:  Cullisse, Nigg.

TWO NIGG LOVAT SCOUTS
Today there is reproduced photographs of two sons of Mr John Forbes, cattleman, Cullisse, Nigg.
Pte. George Forbes, 5/40464, Gordons, joined the Lovat Scouts early in 1915, and transferred subsequently to the Gordons. He was wounded in France on 4th April 1917.
Pte. James Forbes, 5/4076, also joined the Scouts, and subsequently transferred to the Gordons. He was invalided home suffering from pleurisy after being several months in the trenches.

Date of Paper:  08.06.1917
Surname:  Forbes
First Name(s):  James
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  Lovat Scouts /Gordons
Home Address:  Cullisse, Nigg.

Date of Paper:  23.11.1917
Surname:  Forsyth
First Name(s):  George
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  Camerons
Home Address:  Glaickmore, Tore.

We reproduce today photographs of three of the five soldier sons of Mr and Mrs Forsyth, Glaickmore, Tore, Ross-shire.
Lance-Corpl. W. Forsyth, Seaforths, has been two years and four months in France, going over with the County Territorials in 1914. He was wounded at the battle of Arras and buried in a shell hole for 4-1/2 hours before being dug out by a Royal Scot. He has made a wonderful recovery, and is now convalescent at Aldershot. He is the youngest son of the family, and before the war was a ploughman with the laird of Fettes.
Corpl. George Forsyth, Camerons, the eldest son of the family, was a year and a half in France, and is now with the third battalion. Before the war he was a chauffeur with Col. Grant Peterkin, Grangehall, Forres.
Corpl. Rowallan Forsyth, the fifth son of the family, served nine months in the Dardanelles, and has been two years in France. He was a barman before joining up.
The other two sons, Archie and David, are on home service.

Date of Paper:  23.11.1917
Surname:  Forsyth
First Name(s):  Rowallan
Rank:  Corporal
Regiment:  Not stated
Home Address:  Glaickmore, Tore.

Date of Paper:  23.11.1917
Surname:  Forsyth
First Name(s):  William
Rank:  Lance Corporal
Regiment:  Seaforths
Home Address:  Glaickmore, Tore

No photo available

Date of Paper:  17.11.1916
Surname:  Forsyth
First Name(s):  William James
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  4th Camerons
Home Address:  122 High Street, Invergordon

INVERGORDON CAMERON DIES OF WOUNDS
Private William James Forsyth, Cameron Highlanders, who has died of wounds received in action on the 18th October, aged 19, is the second son of Mr George Forsyth, 122 High Street, Invergordon, late 78th Highlanders.
Private Forsyth joined the Lovat Scouts, and after some months training was transferred to the 4th Camerons at Ripon, and later drafted to another Cameron battalion. Before joining the colours Private Forsyth was in the employment of Wordie & Co., Invergordon. The deceased's elder brother is wounded in England, but is making a good recovery.
The heartfelt sympathy of all who knew Pte. William Forsyth goes out to his sorrowing parents and their family in their great loss.

Date of Paper:  10.11.1916 and 08.12.1916
Surname:  Fowler
First Name(s):  John
Rank:  Private
Regiment:  3rd Seaforths
Home Address:  Knocknasannoch, Culbokie

TWO CULBOKIE BOYS WITH THE COLOURS
Above we reproduce the photographs of two sons of Mr and Mrs Wm. Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie. 1609 Sergt. Wm. Fowler, 1/4th Seaforths, was wounded at Neuve Chapelle in March 1915. He has made a good recovery, and is now back with his regiment. In his 24th year, previous to the war he was a gamekeeper with Mr Duncan Davidson of Tulloch. He went to France with the battalion in November 1914. The elder son, 10870 Private John Fowler, is with the 3rd Seaforths, but, so far, has not crossed the Channel. He is 29 year of age, and always worked the croft at home for his parents.

[08.12.1916]
We reproduce today a photograph of Pte. John Fowler, Seaforths, who, as was intimated last week, has been killed in action. A son of Mr Wm. Fowler and Mrs Fowler, Knocknasannoch, Culbokie, he was 29 years of age, and attested under the Derby scheme.
He was a typical young Highlander, and was much esteemed, both for his own and his parents sake, throughout the district.  Previous to the war deceased always worked on the farm with his parents.

Date of Paper:  10.11.1916 and 08.12.1916
Surname:  Fowler
First Name(s):  William
Rank:  Sergeant
Regiment:  1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Knocknasannoch, Culbokie

Date of Paper:  Illegible
Surname:  Fowler
First Name(s):  John
Rank:  Captain
Regiment:  1/4th Seaforths
Home Address:  Lochbroom

The Late Sir John Fowler, Bart.
Killed In Action
Captain Sir John Fowler, whose death while serving with the 1/4th Seaforths in France took place on Tuesday morning, June 22nd, was the grandson of the eminent engineer who made his name by the designing and carrying out of the London Underground Railway and the construction of the Forth Bridge.
Sir John's father, the late Sir Arthur Fowler, died in March 1899 and it was not till seven years later that young Sir John attained his majority.
Like his father and grandfather, he had a strong predilection for the sea and wished to enter the Navy as a profession but defective eyesight prevented this course from being adopted. He was therefore educated at Harrow in the late Mr H. O. Davidson's house and rose rapidly to the Sixth, or top form, passing at 18 direct into Sandhurst from Harrow, and having also qualified for Woolwich.
The lessons learnt from the Boer War in the early years of this century had led the military authorities to adopt a much higher standard of efficiency and discipline for cadets at Sandhurst than had been sufficient in the past. Colonel Kitson, who commanded the Military College in 1903, inaugurated the new regime with great ability and energy, and it was fortunate for Sir John Fowler and his brother that they passed through Sandhurst during Colonel Kitson's administration.
Sir John Fowler was the first cadet to be offered a commision under the new rules by Colonel Kitson. The commision was in one of the best known cavalry regiments about to proceed to India. Sir John was also given the opportunity of entering two of the Guards regiments, but, acting upon the advice of eminent and experienced officers, he decided to wait for a vacancy in the Seaforth Highlanders, the regiment so closely connected with Ross-shire.
Having received his commission in the 78th Highlanders, he joined the Battalion in Dublin, and was subsequently stationed at Aldershot, the Castle, Edinburgh, and Fort George, and finally at Shorncliffe.
In October 1913 he was appointed to the adjutancy of the 4th Seaforths (Territorial Battalion), and was in consequence able to spend most of his weekends on his property in Lochbroom on which he had been born and brought up.
His tastes were all for country life, and he passed many happy autumn days stalking and shooting. But his greatest enjoyment was always a day spent on the waters of the Moray Firth or of Lochbroom in a small open motor boat.
While stationed at Edinburgh in 1907 and 1908 he twice acted as aide-de-camp to the Lord High Commisioner (at that time Lord Kinnaird) during the latter's residence at Holyrood, for the fortnight in May for the meetings of the General Assembly.
As an officer of the Royal Company of Archers he acted as one of the King's Bodyguard on the occasion of His Majesty's visit to Holyrood in 1911 and he shortly afterwards received the Coronation Medal.
Though baptised and brought up Church of England, he and his brother were regular attendants at the Parish Church of Lochbroom, there being no Episcopalian Church within 35 miles of their home. Both brothers thus acquired a great love for the Scottish Psalms unaccompanied by any musical instrument. When superintending regimental services Sir John never favoured the introduction of many hymns, and, writing from France, he spoke of the grand effect of the old Scotch Psalm tunes
at the open air services, held sometimes within sound of the guns, with friendly and hostile aeroplanes circling overhead.
He saw many of his Battalion laid to rest among the blossoming fruit trees of the cemetery at Vielle Chapelle, and, in speaking of some of the engagements in which many of his best friends fell, he said: "The charge of the Light Brigade fades into nothing compared with what we have witnessed in the present war."
Within the last two months three officers who held in succession the post of Adjutant to the 4th Seaforths have laid down their lives for their King and Country, namely: Major Arbuthnot with the 2nd Battalion; Captain Davidson with the 1st Battalion; and Sir John Fowler with the 4th Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders.

"And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers
And the temples of his gods."

Continued on page 02 
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