Strathconon War Memorial


Strathconon War Memorial.





The rear of the Monument looking towards Dalbreac Lodge.


The east side of the Monument.

Strathconon War Memorial

1914-1918

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF STRATHCONON WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE IN THE GREAT WAR FOR GOD, KING AND COUNTRY.

KILLED IN ACTION

Sergt James Macdonald, 4th Seaforth Highlanders

DIED ON ACTIVE SERVICE
Stoker John Macgregor, H.M.S. Eclipse

DILEAS GU BAS

IN HONOUR ALSO OF THOSE WHO SERVED AND IN GOD'S MERCY RETURNED.

There are not many names on this memorial but this glen was 'cleared' of people in the 1800's.

Extract from the 'Ross-shire Journal' dated - 21.12.1917:


Name James Macdonald.  Rank Sergeant.  Army No. 204806.  Regiment Seaforth Highlanders.  Home Address Bridgend, Strathconon, Ross-shire.

As briefly announced last week, Sergeant James Macdonald, Seaforths (whose photograph is reproduced to-day), was killed in action on November 22nd. Deceased hailed from Bridgend, Strathconon, where his sister and brothers reside. One of the Ross-shire Territorials, he mobilised in August, 1914, went to France in November of the same year, and shared with his battalion the strenuous work of holding the line until, with the Indian Corps, he shared in the severe infantry fighting at Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge, etc., subsequently taking part in the great battles in which the Highland Territorial Division was engaged. In one famous fight he was in a selected company told off to hold an important position, a task which was successfully accomplished. A fine, stalwart Highlander, courageous and daring, he was one of the few remaining links connecting the 1914 B.E.F. men with those who came later to fill the gaps. He will be much missed in the battalion, and there are many in the Glens of Strathconon who will mourn his loss, while deep sympathy will go out to the bereaved sister and brothers. In civil life Sergt. Macdonald was associated in business with his brother in Strathconon, where together they carried on business as tailors and clothiers for the widely scattered district. Captain George W.K. Macpherson (Dingwall), in a letter to Miss Macdonald says:  "It only remains for me to convey to you the warmest sympathy of the officers and men of this company in your bereavement. During the recent operations your brother acted as Company Sergeant-Major, and his experience and coolness under heavy fire were of great help to us all. He was killed on November 22nd. during a counter-attack by greatly superior numbers of the enemy, while he was making a gallant stand against heavy odds. He was shot through the heart by a bullet, and died immediately without suffering, in the midst of several of his friends. It has been truly said that on that day we lost the flower of our battalion, and it is certainly true of your brother that he was one of the best non-commissioned officers in the company. He invariably remained cool and calm, and he was one on whom everyone relied. He was a most capable soldier, and a very able leader, and was very popular with the men, who trusted him entirely. All the officers of this company held him in high esteem as a non-commissioned officer , and to-day our company is poorer by his loss. I realise to some extent how much he must have meant to you, and how very real your loss must be, and so to-day, while realising that God alone can afford you all comfort, I do not hesitate to voice our united sympathy, knowing how much even human sympathy means in such sorrow."
Terms & Conditions     © Ross and Cromarty Heritage