Strathpeffer Places

Strathpeffer Community Collage
One house not selected by Mr Murray is Crancil Brae, the photograph of which was taken early in the 20th century by the owner, T Wellwood Maxwell, the Strathpeffer chemist.

Residential

Seven homes have been selected by architect Douglas Murray to provide examples of the wide variety of homes in Strathpeffer.


Raven Cottage
An early cottage, originally thatched, tucked into the slope, now surrounded by Victorian villas and dominated by Cromartie Buildings, but it would have been in green fields at one time.


Raven Cottage (c. 1900)
A very plain but elegant and well proportioned large white harled house of about 1785, the farm-house of one of the three original farms at the head of the valley.


Timaru, completed in 1877 to the design of Inverness architect Alexander Ross, is a glorious essay - or at least the frontage is - in carpenter's Gothic style with finely carved posts and balusters and eaves boards. It was built for a retired New Zealand sheep-farmer and has an air of far-off lands about it.


Dunnichen


Dunnichen today.
Dunnichen (formerly Rondebosch) was built in 1902 for a South African on a grand scale, rich in overall form and exquisite in detail, and never sub-divided, in spite of its size, unlike other villas of the period.


Rondebosch in the 1930s.


Rondebosch (now Dunnichen) in the 1930s, with Provost Andrew Murray (Dingwall) and his wife Margaret.


Santrothen (beside the former filling station) is an interesting example of 1950's bungalow style with a part-piended (hipped) and slated roof and bold facing brick detail over entrance and at windows on the front elevation.


No. 8 Kinellan Drive  is a typical council house with an attractive garden.


The drive to Manderley showing on the skyline one of the carved stags that used to adorn the entry gates to Brahan Castle


The pond and front of the house


Sunlight on Manderley.


The wonderful view down the Strath to Dingwall from the garden of Manderley.

Manderley - For a contemporary house I think Angus Macdonald's "Manderley" is a worthy example of the period, also in a piended style with strong overhanging eaves, reflecting the owner's times working in the Far East. It is set on the hillside above the village with spectacular views down the strath to the Cromarty Firth.
[Sadly, Angus Macdonald died in 2010.]


Kinettas (1999 )
A very plain but elegant and well proportioned large white harled house of about 1785, the farm-house of one of the three original farms at the head of the valley.

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