Avoch and Killen Heritage


Boats on burn.


Mrs Jeannie Reid


Fountains on burn.


Harbour


The Helmsdale



High Street

High Street



Central Hotel


Lazy corner.


Old Meal Mill


Mill wheel


Mending and drying nets.


Early school photo.


Station


Tower house.


Travellers


Travellers' camp.


Avoch and Killen Heritage

Boats on burn

Boats used to be dragged up the burn under the Henrietta Bridge. The two nearest boats pictured here are the "Honour Bright", owned by Alexander Macintosh, and the "Alison Ann" which was nicknamed "The Tank".

Mrs Jeannie Reid

Whilst their menfolk went to the fishing, their women had to work hard. In addition to bringing up a large family, Mrs Reid would carry fish around the area in the basket called a "murlach". The contents would be exchanged for oatmeal or vegetables. Similar baskets could also be used for carrying firewood

Fountains on Burn

For a short time the burn sported fountains. The blanket factory may be seen in the background. The weir can still be seen from Long Road.

 Harbour

The old entrance to the harbour can be seen in the centre of the picture. After World War 2 it was changed to the East side. The steps shown here can no longer be seen as the harbour wall now adjoins the road at this point. The boat leaving the harbour is a Scaffie Yawl.

 The Helmsdale

This boat was a regular visitor to the harbour where it discharged coal. John Clark and his brothers sold the coal from lorries around the village and surrounding areas.

High Street

Looking West from the Lazy Corner, the buildings on the left are the Old Post Office and the Station Hotel. The hotel was owned by Kenny Maclean and his sisters and for many years it was always referred to as "Kenny's".

Looking West again, the Central Hotel can be seen after the openings to Alexander St. and John St. The thatched houses on the right stood where the car park for the hotel is now. A water pump may be seen outside one of them.

Central Hotel

This building, known as "Cruikies" after the owners, Cruikshanks. It later became the Harbour Inn then ceased functioning as a pub and was called th 'Bite and Blether'. It is presently used as a residential driving school.

Lazy Corner

Looking down the brae from the upper part of the village the white building is the site of the Mace Store on the corner of George Street. This part of the road has been widened and a separate, raised footpath now exists on the left.

Old Meal Mill

It is difficult to visualise where this mill stood as the road has changed but the old Mackenzie School may be seen on the extreme right of the picture and the east end of Mackenzie Place. Knockmuir Farm is just visible on top of the hill. The Community Centre and Primary School now occupy the land in the foreground of the picture.

Mill Wheel 
The mill was pulled down around the 1950's.

Mending and Drying Nets

This photograph was taken in the area known as 'Dock' and the houses still stand but the land is now enclosed as gardens for the houses.


 Early School Picture

This photograph was probably taken in the early 1900's.

Back Row (L to R) W. Whyte, J. Macleay, G. Mackenzie, K. Cummings, H. Reid, W. Macleman, D. Patience, W. Mann, D. Macleman, W. Noble, Miss Mackay, J. Skinner.

Middle Row L. Bryson, G. Whyte, M. Patience, J. Reid, N. Ma ?, M. Allison, C. Macleman, C.A. Macleman, C. Ross, J. Sutherland, J. Jack.

Front Row G. Patience, R. Jack, W. Reid, G. Patience, W. Jack, A. Ross, D. Sutherland, A. Sutherland, D. MacLeod, W. Macleman.

Station

Until the Beeching era many Black Isle folk used the train to get to Dingwall or, by changing at Muir of Ord, to Inverness. The station building is now a private house.

Tower House

After the disruption of the Church of Scotland in 1843, it was several years before a Free Church was established in Avoch. Sir James Mackenzie of Scatwell refused to grant them a site but John Matheson of Bennetsfield donated this spot at the approach to the village. The building was designed by the architect of Inverness Cathedral, Alexander Ross, and was opened in 1897. In 1929 the church was amalgamated with the Church of Scotland and the building became the village hall for several years. In 1986 it was bought and converted to a private residence. Presently part is being used for a local business whilst the east end is a domestic dwelling place.

Travellers

In earlier days the travelling folk were regular visitors to the area. There are many villagers who remember the travelling people camping at the west end of the village in the area of the present industrial site.

Travellers' camp 

There are many villagers who remember the travelling people camping at the west end of the village in the area of the present industrial site.

 

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